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Dr. K's Exotic Animal ER

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11 hours ago, LittleIggy said:

Poor Merlin! Guess Monty Python and the Holy Grail wasn’t exaggerating about vicious rabbits! ?

Why would anyone get a lizard that would grow to be six feet long? ?

I had iguanas for 20 years and they are marvelous pets.  Also can grow to 6 feet (mine didn't) and they need specialized food and housing.  It's a definite commitment you must make to the animal to take care of it properly.  When I started, there was no internet and the books that were available had a lot of misinformation ('"feed them romaine lettuce").  It's amazing we made it past the first year.  Luckily, the internet finally came along and there were many groups and resources to turn to.  What I don't understand is why these featured clients don't do that -- there is so much information out there.  Or why they don't research the animal before they even get it, instead of impulse-buying and hoping for the best.  That's where I start to get very angry.

And what I'd like to know is, how are these people getting lemurs?!

Edited by Rammchick
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34 minutes ago, Rammchick said:

And what I'd like to know is, how are these people getting lemurs?!

They are in Florida.  Where stuff that should be illegal, isn't.  ;-)

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54 minutes ago, walnutqueen said:

They are in Florida.  Where stuff that should be illegal, isn't.  ;-)

Yes looking at https://pethelpful.com/exotic-pets/10-Exotic-Pets-That-Are-Legal-In-Florida I see lemurs listed as legal under #6 of the article

Reading the intro, it's fairly obvious the author and I have widely different opinions regarding the wisdom of keeping "exotic pets." Quoting the author, "For a Class 3 permit, you are asked some basic questions about the species you are applying for and how you plan to care for it. In my humble opinion, I don't see a need to require permits for most of the species listed, and Class 2 animals should be moved down to the rules for 3. The only species that should require experience and/or inspections should be truly dangerous animals, such as big cats (not including the cheetah, snow leopards, and medium-sized cats), elephants, and great apes."  

Nope, I'll never agree with her "humble opinion" as stated above. But, rather than rant about the wisdom of her stance, I'll just hope this article answers how Dr K's clients are bringing in lemurs.

Oh, and following a link from the above article, Florida is not alone, or in my opinion the worst, in allowing exotics pets  https://pethelpful.com/exotic-pets/exotic-pet-legal-state (same author as first article, and I have problems with several of her statements.)

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I was a little surprised that the Savannah cat qualified as an exotic by Dr. K's standards since it's an accepted breed by The International Cat Association. Regardless, it's gross. (In my humble opinion, as I guess we say now as a way to excuse our own stupidity.) Stop crossbreeding with wild animals!

Glad that the poor pigeon with the rotten egg was okay.

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1 hour ago, SRTouch said:

Yes looking at https://pethelpful.com/exotic-pets/10-Exotic-Pets-That-Are-Legal-In-Florida I see lemurs listed as legal under #6 of the article

Reading the intro, it's fairly obvious the author and I have widely different opinions regarding the wisdom of keeping "exotic pets." Quoting the author, "For a Class 3 permit, you are asked some basic questions about the species you are applying for and how you plan to care for it. In my humble opinion, I don't see a need to require permits for most of the species listed, and Class 2 animals should be moved down to the rules for 3. The only species that should require experience and/or inspections should be truly dangerous animals, such as big cats (not including the cheetah, snow leopards, and medium-sized cats), elephants, and great apes."  

Nope, I'll never agree with her "humble opinion" as stated above. But, rather than rant about the wisdom of her stance, I'll just hope this article answers how Dr K's clients are bringing in lemurs.

Oh, and following a link from the above article, Florida is not alone, or in my opinion the worst, in allowing exotics pets  https://pethelpful.com/exotic-pets/exotic-pet-legal-state (same author as first article, and I have problems with several of her statements.)

I'm afraid if I read much further into this article, I would die of thundering apoplexy, and my cats and wild critters would have no one to feed them.  The wild critters would do just fine (other than Mama Raccoon missing her nighttime TeeVee), but the cats - especially twice daily medicated Babalu?  Not so much.  Go fuck yourselves, States that allow private ownership of exotics.  And while I'm at it, go fuck yourselves, people who think you should be allowed to own exotics.

Speaking of exotics ... my TeeVee watching Mama Raccoon brought her three little roly-poly babies to the cat food bowls last night, for the first time.  They are so stinkin' cute at that age - all askeered &  running for cover from the scary human who brings the food,  but curious enough to watch their Mama give that lady an appreciative foot pat before devouring said food.  They will grow up learning that I have little interaction with them, other than food - no petting or cuddles allowed (no matter how cute & squishable their little bandit faces are).  Raccoons have been my backyard denizens for decades, and I've never made a pet of a single one of them.  What's wrong with appreciating wild animals in their own habitat, I ask you Floridians?

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What would you do walnutqueen, if mamaraccoon died and those 3 babies hung around your porch despondently? Or needed medical help too?

That's how it starts, from being helpful, I think. I know people who rescued orphan raccoons. It's not in the same category as lemurs, little monkeys, etc. I feel really bad for the little purse monkeys.

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58 minutes ago, andipandi said:

That's how it starts, from being helpful, I think. I know people who rescued orphan raccoons. It's not in the same category as lemurs, little monkeys, etc. I feel really bad for the little purse monkeys.

Yep, there's a difference between stepping in to help an injured animal or orphaned babies - that I get, even though I know it would be better to find a licensed rehibilatator.

But seems most of these folks are getting these exotics for the wrong reasons - more about looks or a talking point than looking out for best interest of the animal  - remember the couple who brought in a monkey and asked about pulling its teeth - not for some medical reason, but to prevent biting and chewing on stuff. These are the same type of people who leave their cat/dog at a shelter because it doesn't match the new couch, is too much work to groom/exercise, is not longer a cute kitten/puppy, or is misbehaving because it's never been trained, etc 

Ok, time to stop before I start a major rant - suffice it to say I differentiate between domestic animals and wild animals being kept as pets. Remembering that too many people who have either should not be allowed to own a pet rock.

Edited by SRTouch
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And they don't even take the time to find out how to properly care for them or what they'll be like as an adult.

The people with the monkey that wanted his teeth pulled, we're reprimanded by Dr K. They didn't even know what monkey chow was.

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6 hours ago, andipandi said:

What would you do walnutqueen, if mamaraccoon died and those 3 babies hung around your porch despondently? Or needed medical help too?

That's how it starts, from being helpful, I think. I know people who rescued orphan raccoons. It's not in the same category as lemurs, little monkeys, etc. I feel really bad for the little purse monkeys.

The babies are already self-sufficient, and have an endless supply of cat food, and a safe haven in my back yard, where they belong.  Fortunately, I'm hooked up with wildlife rehabbers, so getting medical help is not a problem, either, should the need ever arise.  

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On 10/22/2018 at 1:48 PM, walnutqueen said:

I'm afraid if I read much further into this article, I would die of thundering apoplexy, and my cats and wild critters would have no one to feed them.  The wild critters would do just fine (other than Mama Raccoon missing her nighttime TeeVee), but the cats - especially twice daily medicated Babalu?  Not so much.  Go fuck yourselves, States that allow private ownership of exotics.  And while I'm at it, go fuck yourselves, people who think you should be allowed to own exotics.

Speaking of exotics ... my TeeVee watching Mama Raccoon brought her three little roly-poly babies to the cat food bowls last night, for the first time.  They are so stinkin' cute at that age - all askeered &  running for cover from the scary human who brings the food,  but curious enough to watch their Mama give that lady an appreciative foot pat before devouring said food.  They will grow up learning that I have little interaction with them, other than food - no petting or cuddles allowed (no matter how cute & squishable their little bandit faces are).  Raccoons have been my backyard denizens for decades, and I've never made a pet of a single one of them.  What's wrong with appreciating wild animals in their own habitat, I ask you Floridians?

However, and as stated before, raccoons carry a roundworm parasite that can remain in soil for a very long time and is deadly to humans.  Please take the utmost care when handling soil in your backyard.

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The tortoise that was run over, had his shell screwed together then was fitted for a temporary shell, was the cutest, perkiest tortoise!  He was such a happy warrior.

And Dr K was so excited to have the 3D printer people successfully make the shell.

On the other hand. When Mini Me the parrot died, it was overwhelming sad for the owner, Dr T, the staff and me too.

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On 10/25/2018 at 10:02 AM, Rammchick said:

However, and as stated before, raccoons carry a roundworm parasite that can remain in soil for a very long time and is deadly to humans.  Please take the utmost care when handling soil in your backyard.

I don't garden anymore, but even when I did, I washed my hands after handling soil.  You actually have to ingest the eggs to contract the disease.

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One thing I really like about Dr. K is that she's always quick to administer pain meds to her patients.  I binge watched several episodes this past weekend, and even though I'd seen some of the episodes before, it really impressed me on this viewing that she is so compassionate and cares so much about the comfort of the animals she treats.  

I was probably influenced because I spent most of the weekend on the couch watching television, dealing with lower back pain and sciatica in my legs.  I need a Dr. K for humans!!

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2 hours ago, 2727 said:

Axolotls!

Venus was cute!

I loved the parrot that began singing. Was it the same one that entertained the kids visiting the piggy?

Those Quaker parrots sure get picked on!

Kudos to the guy who rescued the tortoise and brought him in for treatment. What a mensch.

Edited by LittleIggy
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I was relieved that the owner of the Quaker parrot said as she was leaving, that her parrots would be in separate cages from now on.

He was a sweet bird.

It was heartwarming to see the turtle set free at the end. 

Edited by stormy

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If I die on the freeway, let it be because I stopped to save an animal.  (I don't drive freeways, or much further than a mile from all the critters who rely on me to feed & medicate them!  But still ... ).

Back in the day, when I had special relationships with a myriad of caged birds, there was a green parrot named Nora who hated everyone and everything.  But we would sing together.  She sounded just like that singing Quaker parrot   I still remember "our song", fondly.  :-(    One time, I found her on the floor, and unthinkingly put my hand down &  said "step up" before realizing who I was talking to.  She stepped up and was returned to her perch without savaging my fingers or any other part of my person.  My silly songs paid off.   :-)

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The little girl's face when she saw the parrot was pure joy and enchantment. I replayed that scene a couple of times as a bit of emotional boost.  :-)

Can anyone who is watching Vets Saving Pets explain the mastiff who had part of his tail amputated? I didn't fully understand how he did so much damage to his tail just by wagging it.

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I'm new to the show, been binge watching on Hulu, but I have such mixed emotions about it! While I am a huge animal lover and think just about anything with fur is adorable and I should be able to hug it (!) I also agree with so many on here that exoctic pet ownership should be much more regulated! I'm glad there are vets like Dr. K that specialize in exotic care since there are so many people that seem to think we should be able to "own" anything, but some of these cases on the show have absutely broken my heart. Does anyone remember the tiny little pig that a couple brought back from Puerto Rico and was only 37 days old? It was too young and small to be taken away from it's mom, and ended up having pneumonia. They had to euthanize they tiny little thing, and the owners acted all upset. Well, maybe if you didn't rip the poor baby away from it's momma too early and take it from Puerto Rico to Florida when it was so little, it wouldn't have died!!! Ignorant, ignorant people thinking they can properly care for these animals makes me so sad. I'm sorry, but I had to rant somewhere!! Why aren't some of these people cited for animal cruelty??? 

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On 11/9/2018 at 12:28 AM, MrsMay said:

I'm new to the show, been binge watching on Hulu, but I have such mixed emotions about it! While I am a huge animal lover and think just about anything with fur is adorable and I should be able to hug it (!) I also agree with so many on here that exoctic pet ownership should be much more regulated! I'm glad there are vets like Dr. K that specialize in exotic care since there are so many people that seem to think we should be able to "own" anything, but some of these cases on the show have absutely broken my heart. Does anyone remember the tiny little pig that a couple brought back from Puerto Rico and was only 37 days old? It was too young and small to be taken away from it's mom, and ended up having pneumonia. They had to euthanize they tiny little thing, and the owners acted all upset. Well, maybe if you didn't rip the poor baby away from it's momma too early and take it from Puerto Rico to Florida when it was so little, it wouldn't have died!!! Ignorant, ignorant people thinking they can properly care for these animals makes me so sad. I'm sorry, but I had to rant somewhere!! Why aren't some of these people cited for animal cruelty??? 

I’m glad I didn’t see that episode. I was gutted enough by the tiny marmoset who got herpes which was fatal. ?I wanted to throttle the owner. ?

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Okay, the story about the baby lemur made me ??????! No, Dr. Baby-talk, the owners didn’t “do their best.” They bought a pair of primate babies who had been ripped from their mother, took the word of the unscrupulous person who trafficked them as to how to feed them, and were too willfully ignorant to realize that the babies were malnourished. They couldn’t go online to find out what a three month old lemur should look like? I bet they thought it was adorable that those poor creatures stayed so small. ?

Bless the lady who brought the poor duck in and was going to keep it. 

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7 hours ago, LittleIggy said:

Okay, the story about the baby lemur made me ??????! No, Dr. Baby-talk, the owners didn’t “do their best.” They bought a pair of primate babies who had been ripped from their mother, took the word of the unscrupulous person who trafficked them as to how to feed them, and were too willfully ignorant to realize that the babies were malnourished. They couldn’t go online to find out what a three month old lemur should look like? I bet they thought it was adorable that those poor creatures stayed so small. ?

Bless the lady who brought the poor duck in and was going to keep it. 

 The lemurs.  I also was stunned that the owners didn't google "how to take care of a lemur or what to feed a lemur."  I thought Dr. T was way too soft on them.  I was relieved that Lena the baby lemur made a recovery.  The look on her face when they were feeding her was really heartbreaking.  She was so hungry that she looked desperate to eat.  And the other lemur?  Miraculously not near death like Lena.

In the end the owner was crying but her ignorance made me so angry.  She's not the first (or last of these owners) that walk in the door.

Duck lady was the sweetest!

Edited by stormy
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On 11/12/2018 at 3:25 AM, stormy said:

 The lemurs.  I also was stunned that the owners didn't google "how to take care of a lemur or what to feed a lemur."  I thought Dr. T was way too soft on them.  I was relieved that Lena the baby lemur made a recovery.  The look on her face when they were feeding her was really heartbreaking.  She was so hungry that she looked desperate to eat.  And the other lemur?  Miraculously not near death like Lena.

In the end the owner was crying but her ignorance made me so angry.  She's not the first (or last of these owners) that walk in the door.

Duck lady was the sweetest!

 

We've said this multiple times before but it bears repeating that an exotic pet requires research before you ever get it, to make sure you're caring for it properly.  It does make you wonder how many of these are impulse purchases -- "Hey honey, wouldn't it be cool to have a baby lemur?...Sure...Let's get two!"

It's not easy to be confrontational with clients like this.  You don't want them to become so angry that it drives them away.  Then the animal will never get the medical care it needs, so in the end, you haven't helped.  On the other hand, you also want to educate the viewing audience about why these don't make good pets.  Very tricky tightrope to walk.

Edited by Rammchick
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The lemur owners would probably think it was "adorable" if their human babies stayed at their birth weight for months. So small and cute!!

4 hours ago, Rammchick said:

It's not easy to be confrontational with clients like this. You don't want them to become so angry that it drives them away.

It's a difficult line for sure. Dr. K has chosen to specialize in exotics and I imagine those vets have to make peace with sometimes acting as law enforcement with their clients.

I looked up Florida statutes, and it seems like most of the primates we see on the show require a State permit. I wonder if Dr. K's practice ever asks to see them?

This is from a site about pet monkeys. (Easy enough to circumvent, though.)

The state of FL has one of the most comprehensive laws in the country. Class III animals require that the applicant be 16 years old and complete a husbandry form, permit application, and contingency plan form. Structural caging requirements must also be met. Class III animals include Squirrel Monkeys, Marmosets, Tamarins. Capuchins, Wooly and Spider Monkeys.

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2727, having looked at the permit application and the underlying regulations (here, for anyone interested:  https://www.animallaw.info/administrative/florida-exotic-pets-fish-and-wildlife-code-possession-maintenance-and-use-captive#s11), it's clear that foreknowledge and experience are required to obtain the necessary permit.  This suggests that they have to do research to get this piece of paper.  So how is it that these owners are so clueless when they show up on this program?  Do they act dumb for TV?  Don't have a permit at all?  Just write down anything and State of Florida doesn't follow up?  Florida Fish and Wildlife is supposed to perform a home visit to ensure that the animals have adequate and humane caging and clearly there are some other questions about husbandry that are required -- what's going on here?!

Edited by Rammchick
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1 hour ago, Rammchick said:

2727, having looked at the permit application and the underlying regulations (here, for anyone interested:  https://www.animallaw.info/administrative/florida-exotic-pets-fish-and-wildlife-code-possession-maintenance-and-use-captive#s11), it's clear that foreknowledge and experience are required to obtain the necessary permit.  This suggests that they have to do research to get this piece of paper.  So how is it that these owners are so clueless when they show up on this program?  Do they act dumb for TV?  Don't have a permit at all?  Just write down anything and State of Florida doesn't follow up?  Florida Fish and Wildlife is supposed to perform a home visit to ensure that the animals have adequate and humane caging and clearly there are some other questions about husbandry that are required -- what's going on here?!

 

I'm just winging it and haven't done any research on the subject lately. I really wonder if this is another case where the law looks good on paper but fails in execution. I mean the law may require Fish and Wildlife to conduct inspections without actually providing the  personnel/funding to do the job. Way back, when I first googled this stuff when a poster asked how/where people were getting lemurs, I noticed that at least some applications can be made online. Oh, and I read the questionnaire that is supposed to be filled out and it looked like a joke - if an applicant is allowed to fill that thing out online they could cut and paste the answers. It's obvious from some of the clients on the show that many of these mental midgets never actually read and/or thought about the animals' physical and social needs.

My feeling - admittedly without any actual knowledge, is that the licensing enforcement is reactive rather than proactive. Not enough funding to do the job and enforcement very cursory until things go sideways - an animal escapes or hurts someone - and than the "owner" is cited and probably given a second (or third - or fourth) chance to comply before the animal is taken away. (At least partly because there is very limited space to put any confiscated animals - so enforcement officers end up having to rely on rescues/non profits having space and resources.)

Ok, 'nuf said - need to stop here or I'll start a rant about how many people shouldn't be allowed to keep any pets - parvo puppies - puppy mills - etc. And how bad things have to be before animal control steps in to help normal everyday pets despite laws being on the books.

Edited by SRTouch
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1 hour ago, SRTouch said:

I'm just winging it and haven't done any research on the subject lately. I really wonder if this is another case where the law looks good on paper but fails in execution. I mean the law may require Fish and Wildlife to conduct inspections without actually providing the  personnel/funding to do the job. Way back, when I first googled this stuff when a poster asked how/where people were getting lemurs, I noticed that at least some applications can be made online. Oh, and I read the questionnaire that is supposed to be filled out and it looked like a joke - if an applicant is allowed to fill that thing out online they could cut and paste the answers. It's obvious from some of the clients on the show that many of these mental midgets never actually read and/or thought about the animals' physical and social needs.

My feeling - admittedly without any actual knowledge, is that the licensing enforcement is reactive rather than proactive. Not enough funding to do the job and enforcement very cursory until things go sideways - an animal escapes or hurts someone - and than the "owner" is cited and probably given a second (or third - or fourth) chance to comply before the animal is taken away. (At least partly because there is very limited space to put any confiscated animals - so enforcement officers end up having to rely on rescues/non profits having space and resources.)

Ok, 'nuf said - need to stop here or I'll start a rant about how many people shouldn't be allowed to keep any pets - parvo puppies - puppy mills - etc. And how bad things have to be before animal control steps in to help normal everyday pets despite laws being on the books.

From what I've seen, you've hit the nail on the head, @SRTouch.  There are just not enough resources to manage the quagmire of the exotic animal trade, much less domestic animal welfare.

The exotic pet industry is a vicious and cruel enterprise, and hundreds of thousands of creatures suffer and die needlessly because of it.  

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@SRTouch, what percentage of dogs and cats, in your experience in animal control, are properly licensed? I'm guessing it's pretty low and that most municipalities have no process in place to address that either, unless there's an incident. I once had to take my sister's unlicensed cat to the vet and nobody there questioned me about it.

I'd like to think that exotic breeders would make buyers show their permits before completing the sale, but sketchy breeders are a big part of the problem in the first place.

Lemurs seem to be selling for around $2-3K. I'd be crying, too.

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1 hour ago, 2727 said:

@SRTouch, what percentage of dogs and cats, in your experience in animal control, are properly licensed? I'm guessing it's pretty low and that most municipalities have no process in place to address that either, unless there's an incident. I once had to take my sister's unlicensed cat to the vet and nobody there questioned me about it.

I'd like to think that exotic breeders would make buyers show their permits before completing the sale, but sketchy breeders are a big part of the problem in the first place.

Lemurs seem to be selling for around $2-3K. I'd be crying, too.

Oops, don't want to misrepresent here - I've never officially been involved in animal control except for being a concerned bystander. I admit to being a failed TNR volunteer - had to quit being anything other than financial contributor when my house filled with cats that I couldn't successfully rehomed. Same failure with fostering - always seemed to add the foster to the family.

Big reason I bought instead of renting was landlord objected to number of my cats. I have 6 neutered cats - 2 more than allowed in this jurisdiction - besides he wanted to insist I declaw - which wasn't happening. 

As for ratio of licensed vs unlicensed (and include unvaccinated) - way way more unlicensed than licensed.

Edited by SRTouch
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12 hours ago, andipandi said:

cats need licenses?

<ducks>

Lol ...

Seriously,  though, cats are, as a whole, very effective predators. In Australia, where cats are an invasive species, they have hunted dozens of native species to extinction and threaten over a hundred more. 

Much as I love my cats, this is another reason to keep them inside.... even if Silly is the only one of mine to have ever caught anything  (I don't think he has had a major impact on the leaf and/or grasshopper population so far.)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_predation_on_wildlife

Edited by SRTouch
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I am so very fortunate that my backyard semi-feral cats have shown no interest in hunting birds.  Perhaps because they were born in my back yard, and grew up being fed mere feet away from all the bird feeders near my windows, or maybe because they are inherently lazy; but they pay less attention to the birds than my indoor Babalu (who still jumps up on the window screen in a futile effort to get at those teasing birds).  I've never found feathers or seen them hunt anything.  In fact, when the starlings feed their young from the cat food bowls, they are on the ground about 3-4 feet away from some of the cats napping by the back door, and those cats barely even glance at those bold starlings!  I'm sure my cats are an embarrassment to their predatory species - and I am grateful not to have to choose between any of my critters!  ;-)

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On 2018-10-29 at 3:00 PM, stormy said:

The tortoise that was run over, had his shell screwed together then was fitted for a temporary shell, was the cutest, perkiest tortoise!  He was such a happy warrior.

And Dr K was so excited to have the 3D printer people successfully make the shell.

On the other hand. When Mini Me the parrot died, it was overwhelming sad for the owner, Dr T, the staff and me too.

Ok if the 3D people were able to make a replacement shell why not make a replacement beak for Quincey the Quaker parrot whose beak was torn off? I’ve see replacement beaks made for parrots.

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2 hours ago, Bunnyette said:

Ok if the 3D people were able to make a replacement shell why not make a replacement beak for Quincey the Quaker parrot whose beak was torn off? I’ve see replacement beaks made for parrots.

 

I think it was because there was no way to attach it.  But I'm not positive what the reason was.

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On 11/15/2018 at 6:47 PM, SRTouch said:

Lol ...

Seriously,  though, cats are, as a whole, very effective predators. In Australia, where cats are an invasive species, they have hunted dozens of native species to extinction and threaten over a hundred more. 

Much as I love my cats, this is another reason to keep them inside.... even if Silly is the only one of mine to have ever caught anything  (I don't think he has had a major impact on the leaf and/or grasshopper population so far.)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_predation_on_wildlife

 

Aside from the damage that free roaming cats can do -- and I can attest to that personally, from working in rehab -- cats make a mighty fine snack for wild predators.  I live on an island populated by very well fed coyotes, and people regularly report that their outside cats often don't come home :(.  

Edited by Rammchick
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Loved the possum. I petted a possum named Ophelia at a nature center, and she was so soft. Sweet natured too.

Edited by LittleIggy
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Finally, an episode that was upbeat. Injured and sick animals healed with positive results and happy endings.

The alligator segment was crazy.  Dr T's reaction was funny.

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It was good to see Bob Freer again.  He is fearless (and sometimes perhaps foolhardy) when it comes to rescuing wild animals.

I liked the positive outcomes, but was pissed at the irresponsibility of exotic pet owners - again.  First, people spend big buck$ at an unscrupulous pet store on an unweaned baby macaw, but then relinquish it rather than pay a vet bill when the bird breaks a wing.  Then there was the kinkajou owner, who just got tired of cutting up fruits & veggies ... seriously?  Thank goodness both animals are now in capable hands.

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Interesting that Tom Cronenwett, the vet tech, was back on.  According to his Facebook page, he left the practice somewhat disgruntled over a year ago and is now in Texas.

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1 hour ago, walnutqueen said:

It was good to see Bob Freer again.  He is fearless (and sometimes perhaps foolhardy) when it comes to rescuing wild animals.

I liked the positive outcomes, but was pissed at the irresponsibility of exotic pet owners - again.  First, people spend big buck$ at an unscrupulous pet store on an unweaned baby macaw, but then relinquish it rather than pay a vet bill when the bird breaks a wing.  Then there was the kinkajou owner, who just got tired of cutting up fruits & veggies ... seriously?  Thank goodness both animals are now in capable hands.

Seriously, you can't be bothered to chop fruits and vegetables for your pet?  

What the hell do you eat? I shared vegetables with my bunny everyday for his salad.  These people are in unabashedly disgusting.

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My 11 year old daughter cuts up collards every day for her dragon. If an 11 yr old can do it, surely an adult can.

(of course the dragon doesn't always eat them, he is picky and holds out for bugs n berries.)

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My guess is that "tired of food prep" is code for "kinkajous make poor pets," what with all the hissing and snapping this one was doing. And as one site says, "Litter/house training is not really feasible." They apparently can live 25+ years.

I was happy to see the possum back to normal after surgery and for both Dr. T and the wildlife rescue person to reiterate that possums, and wild animals in general, don't make good house pets. (While featuring one who was tame and calm. Sigh.)

I hope the gray bunny adopters do well by her, but an impulse purchase of any animal is kind of a red flag.

Tom has been gone for a while so I was surprised to see him back. I'm dopey and can forget that eps aren't aired in chronological order. Did his FB comments mention why he was unhappy? If I had to guess, was it money?

Judging by the number of student observers and interns rotating in and out of there, Dr. K seems to be very generous with her teaching time.

Edited by 2727
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There is definitely something going on when an owner gives up on a pet with a lame excuse like "tired of chopping fruits and vegetables".  But in this case, the kinkajous was lucky and fortunately will be in a better place.

I too was a bit uncomfortable with the little girl and the bunny. As a former bunny owner (I had two) that were adopted from the AHS, I know why they end up there. I'm hoping for the best for that rabbit.

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Tom Cronenwett is in Austin, Texas.

June 16 ·

Very grateful for my job now! Back at a place where we see Dogs as well as Avian & Exotics.There is a management team so no dictator vet. No more ego trips, multiple relatives running the place and no more vets killing a patient 3 states over by giving drug dosages over the phone...alledgely

I always liked Tom, seemed very gentle for a big guy.

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