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MrMattyMatt

Pawn Stars

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I saw an episode last night, I am assuming it's a newer one as I don't watch the show regularly, but Chumlee lost tons of weight.  Good for him. but it also appeared that he had his teeth bleached and that's really all I could focus on in the talking head/body scenes....   Now he can cut his hiar.

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I cannot stand Chumlee. Much prefer the original concept of learning a little about the objects brought in with minimal byplay of Big Hoss and Chumlee. I prefer Rick and The Old Man.

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Something is definitely different with Chum's teeth. I'm not sure if they are whiter or if he has gotten veneers. Either way he looks different (in a good way.) And yes, he has lost a lot of weight. So has Cory. Cory looks good with his beard.

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Just argh.   A few weeks back we had Chumlee as the king of practical jokes.   Cory couldn't get him no matter what.   Chum was just too good.   Now for April Fool's day (which you know was filmed months ago) Chum is suddenly so stupid he doesn't even know that April Fool's pranks are only for April Fool's day.   And the best he can come up with is to tell the intern she can have the day off.   Oh hahahahahha,  My sides are busting from laughing so hard.   NOT.

Just stick to the stuff being pawned.   Leave out the "family" storylines.  I want to see the cool stuff that no other pawn shop in Vegas handles and hear the history of it.

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A place to discuss particular episodes, arcs and moments from the show's run. Please remember this isn't a complete catch-all topic -- check out the forum for character topics and other places for show-related talk

 

I have moved some posts here that were in Small Talk.  Small Talk is for non-show related conversations.  Socializing. That kind of thing.

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I really like it when they let Chumlee show his knowledge. It's so few and far between; I get tired of him as the comic relief.

That said ... him being inserted into the paintings was pretty great.

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Step up to the plate with the Pawn Stars when a Bible that belonged to Mickey Mantle throws Corey a curveball. Believed to be from a rehab visit, will the Bible be a revelation or make a quick exodus out of the shop? Then, Rick is intrigued when a customer brings in a pen President Lyndon B. Johnson used to sign Medicare into law. Will he sign on the dotted line or will the price be too painful? And later, the guys start a competition that tests their buying skills. Can Rick become the biggest dealmaker in the shop or will Corey and Chumlee turn him into a sore loser?

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Paint the town red with the Pawn Stars when a Monet landscape brushes into the shop. Will the artwork make a bad impression on Rick or will this picture be worth a million dollars? Then, Corey feels the heat when a customer brings in an old firefighter station. Can he douse this customer's expectations or will he get burned? And later, when Rick's history lesson on Cinco de Mayo drives the guys loco, Rick may be uninvited to his own fiesta.

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I hate when they do "competitions" with the guys.   First of all, it is so fake and detracts from the show that is about cool items being pawned.   Then they are always set up so that the village idiot that normally can't even seem to tie his shoes wins.   Why?   Because for reasons that escape me, Chumlee is popular.   So they cater to the fans and have him win.   So blatantly it is physically painful to watch.

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I thought they dragged out the Monet reveal too long.  And that totally unscripted bit about leaving Rick out of the Cinco de Mayo party?  Not fun, and not nice, even if it wasn't real.  Why would I want to watch that?  But the same is true of all the non-pawn related bits.  I still like this show though.  I'll keep watching.

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I love when the people bring in letters from famous people and then are amazed it's not actually signed by the famous person.   Like they have never heard of form letters or autopens.   Who in this day and age has not heard of form letters?   Do these people really believe that this famous person has nothing better to do than write personal letters to every single person who writes to them?   

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Most of these people would be better off selling thier crap on ebay or similar in an "all sales final" way, rather than trying to get something out of a pawn shop.

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On the 5/22 episode the barber who brought in the antique barber chair looked suspiciously like the same barber who cuts the Old Man's hair.  Big Hoss took him to get his hair cut by this guy in one episode a while back.  It's just like the guitars.  Some of the guys trying to sell the guitars to the shop are actually employees at the local music store.

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During the marathon yesterday I saw an early episode (might have been the first episode) where Davy Deals is trying to pawn a motorcycle to make payroll.   Corey is treating him like a stranger.   Fast forward a few seasons and Davy is an annoying semi-regular.

 

As for the barber chair, in the past we have always seen Rick Dale restoring the chairs.  Now, this new guy wanders in and acts like he has been doing the restorations for the pawn shops forever.  Same thing has been happening with cars and bikes, no Count.   Guess if they have their own shows, they would have to be paid to appear on Pawn Stars.  But I miss the regulars.

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I really couldn't stand the story line of Corey wanting to be part owner of the pawn shop.

He was going to quit if Rick and the old man didn't make him a partner - going so far as to interview with another pawn shop in the area! (yeah, right)

Corey just came across as an entitled douche. I do think he is a douche IRL.

 

The story was so fake because why would you leave a job where you basically only have to show up on days that they are filming, and even if you aren't a part owner, you are still making some decent money.

 

It would have been fun watching him quit, and starting out scrubbing toilets in another pawn shop.

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How old is Cory?  In his negotiations he acts like he has more experience and expertise than both his father and grandfather combined.  I'd ask for someone else to help me if I went in there, both he and Chumlee look and act completely unprofessional IMO.

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I don't know how old he is but, he is completely full of shit. He doesn't know all that crap he spews about the history of shit off the top of his head. It is all set up. He wikis everything. Would it hurt him to wash his hair?

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Aren't Corey and Chumlee childhood buddies? A while back they had an episode about Chumlee's 30th birthday (he seems so much younger based on how he acts sometimes) so wouldn't that put Corey at about the same age?

I wonder if Rick actually knows the stuff he spews out off the top of his head either but he does a more convincing job than Corey.

Yeah, that story about Corey quitting was so bogus. He's probably making plenty without having any ownership in the shop so what's his problem (besides the obvious)?

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Yeah, that story about Corey quitting was so bogus. He's probably making plenty without having any ownership in the shop so what's his problem (besides the obvious)?

I saw a few of those Corey tries to quit episodes. The show needs to stop acting like it is some real documentary about guys working in a pawn shop and start making it a bit more real. I mean I would have loved it if when Corey said he was going to quit, if Rick had said "ok you can quit and be the manager of another shop, but then we will stop selling Big Hoss merch in the store, and you won't be on TV anymore and you can forget about things like appearances on Letterman or that kind of thing".

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Most of these people would be better off selling thier crap on ebay or similar in an "all sales final" way, rather than trying to get something out of a pawn shop.

Of course, but at the same time, if you try to sell something on ebay you aren't going to get cash the day you put it up for auction. And for the most part you aren't allowed to walk away if the final offer isn't to your liking.   I can see situations where cash right away (and not having to pay ebay/paypal) transaction fees would be enticing to some people. Especially if you have something and you don't really know what it is, if it has any value. At least for show purposes, Rick will bring in an appraiser for you.

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Does anybody enjoy watching the price haggling? It must be popular because there are so many shows now that incorporate it, but it's supremely boring to me. Offer > counter offer, offer > counter offer, offer > counter offer, meet in the middle. What a ride.

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I would rather watch that than Chumlee's latest dumbass act.   At least the haggling is related to the pawn business, unlike Chumlee "working" from home or Chumlee putting together a trivia team or whatever.

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I would rather watch that than Chumlee's latest dumbass act.   At least the haggling is related to the pawn business, unlike Chumlee "working" from home or Chumlee putting together a trivia team or whatever.

 

Yes, please. The producers need to stop trying to make Chumlee happen. Or Antwaun and Chumlee. Or random young female employee and Chumlee. The only time he's remotely bearable is when they bring in a fake seller with a pair of sneakers and he actually has some expertise.

 

I would say I'm surprised this show is still on except I still watch it. Staying for the occasional unusual item, I guess.

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Does anybody enjoy watching the price haggling? It must be popular because there are so many shows now that incorporate it, but it's supremely boring to me. Offer > counter offer, offer > counter offer, offer > counter offer, meet in the middle. What a ride.

I would enjoy it more if the sellers would be a bit better at haggling. I mean with a few of them you know as soon as they start talking Rick is going to own them (what with them saying things like "how about $X" or "I would like between $X and $Y"). Plus I wish a few more of them would consider walking away if they can't get a good price. I mean it is so annoying when I don't know how many times you see the pre-haggle interview and the person is like  "I hope to get $500" and then they get $200 and they talk about how $200 isn't so bad, as if they had no other choice.

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Yes, he was that big, maybe bigger. Good for him for improving his health. He is still a douche though. In fact he is even douchier if that is a word...lol.

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I dislike the direction this show has taken. I am especially tired of Corey calling his dad a "nerd.' He and the doltish Chumley are happy to through life riding motorcycles and standing around a pawn shop.

 

By the way, is Chumlee really that stupid? I read somewhere that he has several cars, one being a Lamborghini. Not bad for a pawn shop dunce. Of course I assume all four of them are making a nice income. If they are paid for re-runs then they really are doing okay financially.

 

Speaking of finances, in one episode the Old Man has Chumlee wash his car. Did anyone notice that it was a Bentley? They blurred out the hood ornament but Bentleys have a distinctive front. I read he has an extensive collection of cars - all of which are black. 

 

This show is much nicer than the three sharks on "Hardcore Pawn"- they seem to prey on poor people with low prices and they have little respect for thier clientele.

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By the way, is Chumlee really that stupid? I read somewhere that he has several cars, one being a Lamborghini. Not bad for a pawn shop dunce. Of course I assume all four of them are making a nice income. If they are paid for re-runs then they really are doing okay financially.

 

Speaking of finances, in one episode the Old Man has Chumlee wash his car. Did anyone notice that it was a Bentley? They blurred out the hood ornament but Bentleys have a distinctive front. I read he has an extensive collection of cars - all of which are black. 

 

I looked it up yesterday because I was curious and Chumlee has an estimated net worth of around 5 million dollars. Which makes me hate it even more when they do bits where Rick makes him clean up the storage room, or he has to work the night shift, or go get lunch for the guys or he has to stay on the old man's couch when his house is getting fumigated.

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Chumlee is not that dumb.    The recent episode where he managed the hot dog stand?   They made it out everyone was worried he would ruin the business?   He managed a Subway for Rick for 2 years before going to work at the Pawn Shop.   It's all an act for the show.  

 

Yeah I am sick of them all picking on Rick for being smart but it is part and parcel of the Chumlee is a moron story.   You see, apparently Chumlee is the most popular of them.   So if Chumlee who is the village idiot is beloved then the smart one must be ridiculed.    It's the HISTORY Channel try promoting education of history instead of promoting being a moron.  Corey is also not as into playing pranks and getting out of work as portrayed either.   He has wanted to work at that Pawn Shop and take it over from the older generation someday all his life.   It was Rick who wanted his kid to do something else.   So Corey is serious about keeping the store going and is actually responsible about running things.

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It's the HISTORY Channel try promoting education of history instead of promoting being a moron.  Corey is also not as into playing pranks and getting out of work as portrayed either.   He has wanted to work at that Pawn Shop and take it over from the older generation someday all his life.   It was Rick who wanted his kid to do something else.   So Corey is serious about keeping the store going and is actually responsible about running things.

 

This is actually the best show on the History Channel imo (tons better than the imitators) and one of the few that has anything to do with history, so I hate to criticize (..but...). Also reading Rick's book gave me newfound respect for him as a businessman and the difficulty of running a pawn shop. Also, props to Chumlee and Corey for overcoming major drug problems.

 

That said, I agree with the above. On that new quiz show "Pawnography", Corey seems a lot more pleasant, more respectful of his father and it works better for me than his cocky, entitled, smug persona on the show. I don't like him having to be so scornful of Rick for liking to read (loved him bringing out the reading glasses and book at his bachelor party!) I mean, yes, we know the "boys" are playing characters, but do they have to be (a) so dumb (chumlee) and (b) so rude (Corey)? I don't mind some of the storylines and the business itself--experts called in, items and sellers--remains fascinating. Just don't dumb it down quite so much, History Channel! Please.

Edited by Padma
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The autographed postcard collection featured last night was the kind of item they could have spent a lot more time on (instead we got the "go for Chum" nonsense).

 

The appraiser was kind of dick about it with his "It was a waste of my time...kidding, it's awesome." Given the many difficult gets, and the fact that all the signatures were personalized and dated, it still seemed like a low appraisal (a common impression on this show) , though I don't know the market and can't actually dispute his estimate.

 

I would also have liked more insight into the business side of things. I'm always surprised when it makes sense to break up a great collection like this. I'm also surprised that cheesy framing is key to making a sale. Assuming that wasn't just a line of BS from Corey, it kind of makes one think collectors lack good sense about the very thing they are collecting.

 

 

 

 

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I would also have liked more insight into the business side of things. I'm always surprised when it makes sense to break up a great collection like this. 

I haven't seen the episode you are talking about, but breaking up collections totally makes sense to me. I mean whether it is post cards, stamps or comic books there are a lot of collectors out there. Most of them are typically looking for very specific items (that one card they have always wanted) and are usually willing to pay top dollar for it. Most collectors aren't willing to pay top dollar for every card as part of a big set, especially if they only need one or two. Of course like they have said before, breaking things up and listing everything separately takes time, so it is just a matter of figuring out if the payoff is worth the time.

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I haven't seen the episode you are talking about, but breaking up collections totally makes sense to me. I mean whether it is post cards, stamps or comic books there are a lot of collectors out there. Most of them are typically looking for very specific items (that one card they have always wanted) and are usually willing to pay top dollar for it. 

I can understand breaking up a collection of "stuff a collector found over 40 years of collecting", and I understand the business sense of playing to the gap-filling itch. The irony is, of course, that all those completists will eventually die and their kids will happily break up their collections to be sold to fill in the gaps for the next generation of collectors. The circle of life, I guess.

 

But sometimes a collection has a lot of unifying elements that make it more than the sum of its parts, aesthetically, if not monetarily. In this case, we have a collection of autographs from a narrow time period, all in the same format, with a charming back story. It's a shame to see something like that scattered to the wind.

Edited by Latverian Diplomat
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In this case, we have a collection of autographs from a narrow time period, all in the same format, with a charming back story. It's a shame to see something like that scattered to the wind

 

I agree 100%. This wasn't just random autographs, it was a really unique collection and (without any specialized knowledge), I think it should have been valued a lot higher than the estimate.

 

That said, while I enjoy this show and greatly appreciate the "high brow" approach it takes to a pawn shop business, the truth is that many things they have really should be sold somewhere other than a pawn shop. (I hold out a little hope for things placed at Rick's just because it's become so famous for genuine collectibles of interest to history buffs. But, generally speaking, a pawn shop is not where I'd go to sell unique treasures from the past.

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This is actually the best show on the History Channel imo (tons better than the imitators) and one of the few that has anything to do with history, so I hate to criticize (..but...). Also reading Rick's book gave me newfound respect for him as a businessman and the difficulty of running a pawn shop. Also, props to Chumlee and Corey for overcoming major drug problems

 

To me,  I only pay attention when an actual artifact or item is being discussed or haggled over. The 'drama' with the Harrisons or Chumlee I can do without. It's all clearly manufactured and brings nothing to the show. They also seem to be adding more and more of that, as opposed to focusing on the pawn items. Give me some old Civil War gun or documents signed by Jefferson or some awesome toy worth ridiculous amounts of money.

 

Rick knows his stuff - this man is the Bald Head of Knowledge (like The Beard of Knowledge). I've seen Chumlee appear on Counting Cars I think and he definately does not come off as idiotic. It's all an act it seems, maybe to help the Gold and Silver shop actually sells Chumlee merchandise (yes, you can apparently buy Chumlee merchandise).

 

I've always find it interesting that sometimes the people settle for a lot less money than maybe they should. I get the "Cash - Right Now -$100 bills" mentality, but some of these items I would even consider trying out at auction. The person usually settles for 40% or less, which is similar to the auction "take" that Rick always mentions. When you have a known and desirable historical artifact, I wonder if the person would be better off trying their chances at auction. Or at least taking it to Antiques Roadshow and seeing what value it is, and therefore what they can get out of it.

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I would also have liked more insight into the business side of things. I'm always surprised when it makes sense to break up a great collection like this. I'm also surprised that cheesy framing is key to making a sale. Assuming that wasn't just a line of BS from Corey, it kind of makes one think collectors lack good sense about the very thing they are collecting.

My father is a stamp and collectibles dealer, and has been for more than 40 years.  I often help him out, so I hope I can offer some clarification for you.  With the autographs, personalization, unless to a famous person, tends to lesson the value.  The reason for this is that people who want to own an autograph are going to display it, and if it's not personalized to that person, it's not as fun to display.  The catalogue for pricing autographs is Sanders, and a simple signature is worth the least of all autographs.  A handwritten letter - with content - is worth the most.

 

My father also buys large stamp collections, and then breaks them up.  His customers are collectors, and they want specific stamps to fill in their own collections.  Exceptions?  Yes!  I own one of the exceptions - a complete collection of the Alice in Wonderland cinderellas (fantasy stamps) by Gerald King.  A specialty collection of stamps are usually kept together.

 

There are catalogues for just about everything. For stamps, the U.S. ones are Scott, in the U.K. it's Stanley Gibbons, in Germany it's Michel, in France it's Yvertte.  It's no surprise my father owns all of them, as well as dozens of specialty catalogues.  One of his favorite sayings is that you can never lose money owning a catalogue.

 

Besides his enormous catalogue library, he also keeps auction listings, filling in the prices that items fetched to keep for future reference as to values.

 

It's hard work, but you wanted to know how it was figured out - and now you know!

 

Oh, and his advice to collectors?  Collect what you like and don't worry about anything else.

Edited by Minerette
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Oh, and his advice to collectors?  Collect what you like and don't worry about anything else.

Which sort of goes in line with what Rick says in his book about how once a certain product becomes recognized as a collectible it almost becomes impossible to strike it rich on it. Because once something type of product does become a collectible, everyone goes into collector mode. So for something like comics or stamps or cards or coins, back in the day no one thought they would be worth money so almost no one saved them (which reduced the supply). Now every comic book collected saves every copy of every single comic that comes out as if it is the next Action #1 so even 50 years from now there will be an abundant supply of any current comic anyone could ever want.

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I can't stand the drama that the show has become.  I really don't care about a bunch of millionaires whining about such trivial matters. I only want to see the artifacts and get the history and valuation - I could care less about Chumlee and Cory drama or whatever. I simply fastforward through it all.

 

Rick is a history buff - he knows his stuff. Cory on the other hand..I'm not too sure. Chumlee knows his video games and footwear, I will say that.

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I'm gonna say that Corey knows more than it would appear from his act on the show.    In the book, he made it clear he wanted to work in the pawn shop since he was kid.   His dad resisted for the longest time.   He wanted his sons to do something else.   Corey persisted.   So I imagine he knows his stuff.   But his character on the show is the smart ass grandson, so he is stuck with stupid storylines like "I'm gonna leave if I don't get a partnership" and creating hijinks with Chumlee to annoy his dad.

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So bummed... husband and I found ourselves in Vegas during a recent road trip and we tried to stop by the store. There was a line around the block just to get in, with a massive security/parking crew. It looked like hours just to get parking, nevermind into the store. I don't know if they were filming that day or the show's just gotten this big, but we weren't prepared to wait for so long to even get inside. We were hoping to show them some really neat coins we have and a large stamp collection (both inherited and not passions for either of us, though we'd love to see them get into the hands of someone else who can appreciate them)..

 

Anyone know if this is normal for the store? It's far away for us but not THAT far so we might give it another shot some time...

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Things are a bit quiet here, but I thought I'd chime in to say I enjoyed how thrilled Rebecca Romney was with the limited edition Seven Years in Tibet that was featured in the "Oldest Trick in the Book" episode.

 

I also thought it was a case study in the difficulty of establishing a price for something so rare and with such a specialized market it is infrequently traded. 

Edited by Latverian Diplomat

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I missed this but just watched the segment online.  Rick, or you, can go on the Web and buy one new from the publisher for $1500 this morning. They didn't sell out.

 

http://limitededitionsclub.com/seven-years-in-tibet/

 

Or buy secondhand for $4500, because Rebecca is right and people will look at the limitation and charge whatever they think will go.  It appeared at auction every couple of years through the 90s and early 2000s, in 2009 one auction house sold one for $325 and another for $1300. 

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I'm thinking that even Chumlee is a hell of a lot smarter than he acts on the show. He has to be playing the clown for the show, at least I hope so.

I did read that both Coery and Chumlee had a bad few years using methamphetamine in their adolescence.

Is it even possible to be super fat and a meth junky at the same time?

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I would say I'm surprised this show is still on except I still watch it. Staying for the occasional unusual item, I guess.

I'm not sure what it is about this show, but it is one one the few shows that I can watch while reading a book simultaneously.

The way the History Channel runs back to back episodes of it; I often find my TV parked on the channel for long periods.

It obviously gets good ratings, I wonder how many other people leave this show on as background noise like me.

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