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ElectricBoogaloo

S05.E03: Jury Duty

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If Jess wanted a legit reason to get out of jury duty then she could've told the judge about the attorney giving her his phone number (and she is interested in a possible date with him).   

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I love John Cho, but I'm guessing since this is how Jess is getting a break, we won't get to see much more of him. That's a totally waste of his talents. Also, for a lawyer who is all about service/democracy/following the rules, I'm bothered by the fact that he actively hit on someone waiting for jury duty knowing he was going into voir dire. Obviously that could create a conflict, did create a conflict and he didn't report it to the judge. That makes his character a little messy for me. Which sucks, because I do really love John Cho.

 

I loved all the stuff in the apartment. Winston destroying that wall, Cece and Nick basically being each other and Schmidt really not handling the conflict well at all. Cece is a hot slob and that is not cool. I laughed most of the way through it even if it was just silly fun. I do love that Winston got one over on the rest of the group at the end when they were reading Jessica's advice bowl. That was a nice smart joke for him after an episode of silly.

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Since I assume this means Jess wont be around for awhile, I guess this also means we wont get to see much of her flirtatiousness with John Cho. Too bad. If you cast John Cho, I want to get to see him for more than one episode damn it!

 

I missed Ferguson.  

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I'm... not too sad about Jess being gone for awhile. I like Zooey Deschanel well enough, but I've long said she's the weak link in the show. We'll probably still get some video chat and phone calls from her.

 

"Are you hugging them while they're making out?"

 

Winston kills it every time in this show.

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Jess is often my least favourite part of the episode, so I'm okay with her disappearing for awhile. 

 

Cece is by far in the wrong. Nick may be annoying but she moved into a home with three roommates without respecting their space and treating the whole place like it's hers. Not cool. 

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That was a pretty clever way to get rid of Jess for 'a month' for Zooey's pregnancy.

 

Oh . . . is that what's going on? I wondered. I hope when she returns John Cho returns with her.

 

This episode was a bit problematic on two fronts for me. First of all, Nick was entirely in the right and CeCe was entirely in the wrong. That's his apartment, she doesn't live there, and for her to have her clothes and her other stuff laying all around the place is wrong. Nick may tell the same story over and over again but if she doesn't like it she can go home. She doesn't live there.

 

Second, the improvisation on this show is getting a little stale. It's like watching too many Judd Apatow movies. You can tell when the actors are just "riffing" so the director can choose the funniest footage - especially when Max Greenfield does it. His voice gets these really odd inflections that he doesn't use when he's just delivering scripted dialogue and it's gotten a little over the top. 

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I realize they needed to get ride of Jess for awhile, but the jury duty story annoyed me.  First of all, every teacher I know would just get their jury duty reassigned to the summer months.  Second, she could say her boss broke his hip and she has to be acting principal and that could get her reassigned or removed from the jury pool.  And, as already mentioned, saying the lawyer hit on her and gave her his phone number (while she was wearing a jury number!) is also enough to get her out of the case.  I wish they had come up with some other way to get her off the show.

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But the judge might have just reassigned Jess to another jury selection pool.

California has a one-day/one-trial rule, so even if she were sent back to the pool, if it were late enough in the day that she'd already gotten that far in the process, the likelihood other trials were still pulling new people in, and she'd go through the rigmarole, and get selected again for a second trial all in one day are relatively small. In which case, she'd have been done with her service by appearing that one day.

Unless it were Federal. Then they're allowed to keep you on call.

 

 

Second, the improvisation on this show is getting a little stale. It's like watching too many Judd Apatow movies. You can tell when the actors are just "riffing" so the director can choose the funniest footage - especially when Max Greenfield does it. His voice gets these really odd inflections that he doesn't use when he's just delivering scripted dialogue and it's gotten a little over the top.

Did you read somewhere that they improvise regularly? I'm just wondering because a number of shows I've had friends work on/involved with had a certain quality to the text where some viewers assumed the actors were riffing, when in fact the lines in question were as-written. (and it annoys the crap out of the writers) So unless I have corroboration from the crew that a scene was definitely improvised, I am extremely hesitant to assume something was an ad lib. Edited by theatremouse
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Did you read somewhere that they improvise regularly?

 

In the first season they actually showed out-takes with the alternate versions of their ad-libbing, like Schmidt walking into the room and saying something really stupid/obnoxious and everyone yelling at him to put money in the douche jar. He came up with all that stuff on his own. So yeah, there's a lot of ad-libbing.

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Can someone explain to me where did they send Jess?  I did'nt understand that part and I'm not from US so I didn't figure that out.

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Can someone explain to me where did they send Jess?  I did'nt understand that part and I'm not from US so I didn't figure that out.

In the US, if there's a trial with the potential for a lot of press (like a celebrity or a famous incident), the judge may decide to sequester the jury so that the jury cannot discuss the case with friends/family or be influenced by what they saw in the media. They put the jurors into hotels and remove their ability to watch regular TV.  Take away their internet.  I believe, although could be wrong, they limit their contact with friends/family (or maybe monitor it?). To help ensure there is an impartial jury. Otherwise they may hear/see things that may or may not be true (since in the US the media is not always 100% accurate) or that could plant a doubt in their mind which could impact the juror's ability to view only the facts presented by the lawyers in the case. 

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In the US, if there's a trial with the potential for a lot of press (like a celebrity or a famous incident), the judge may decide to sequester the jury so that the jury cannot discuss the case with friends/family or be influenced by what they saw in the media. They put the jurors into hotels and remove their ability to watch regular TV.  Take away their internet.  I believe, although could be wrong, they limit their contact with friends/family (or maybe monitor it?). To help ensure there is an impartial jury. Otherwise they may hear/see things that may or may not be true (since in the US the media is not always 100% accurate) or that could plant a doubt in their mind which could impact the juror's ability to view only the facts presented by the lawyers in the case. 

 

Thankyou! :)

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