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Battle Of The Characters Who Had Legendarily WTF Exits From Law & Order, Played By Actors With Four-Letter Germanic Last Names

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Logan broke a councilman's face; Southerlyn broke the internet. Whose ouster is the winner?

http://previously.tv/law-and-order/battle-of-the-actors-with-four-letter-last-names-whose-characters-had-legendarily-wtf-exits-from-law-order/"> Read the story

 

That would be Logan's. His punching the murderous, homophobic councilman didn't deserve him being booted to Staten Island. Should have just been suspended and marked in his file or whatever. That said, at least they didn't kill him off.

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Aw, I like Elisabeth Rohm.

 

What's weird is that I liked her fine as Kate Lockely on "Angel" prior to this.  And she really surprised the hell out of me in "American Hustle".

 

But I hated Serena.  I can't believe she was only in 85 episodes.

 

But she'd hung around for a while at that point; we'd gotten accustomed to her, and then she got drop-kicked midseason, a dubious honor previously accorded only to Phil "Paul Sorvino, Opera Singer" Ceretta. That in turn sparked rumors of a writers'-room revolt against her line readings, but it's hard to believe it took three-plus seasons for Balcer to get fed up.

 

I remember reading that Rohm had wanted to leave at the start of that season, but the show's Law section had just gotten a big shake-up (this might have been when Jerry Orbach left?) and so the producers asked her to stick around til midseason to help stabilize things.

 

ETA...Wikipedia tells me, yes, this was the first season with Dennis Farina and without Lennie Briscoe.

Edited by TeeVee329
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Fun fact, Elisabeth Rohm and Alana De La Garza are tied as the longest running ADA, each with 85 episodes. De La Garza would've had the record all to herself had they not blown it on making a deal for a final season.

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What's weird is that I liked her fine as Kate Lockely on "Angel" prior to this.

 

 

Wait, Angel was before L&O? I coulda sworn it was the other way around.

 

And harsh as these two had it, at least the weren't Diane Neal and Adam Beach. They didn't die, but Casey had her reputation torched and Chester went to jail for murder! Man, what did they do to piss Wolf off?

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Wait, Angel was before L&O? I coulda sworn it was the other way around.

 

Her final episode of "Angel" was season two's "Epiphany", February of 2001.  She joined "Law & Order" September of 2001.

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I will freely admit that much of my Rohm love stems from Angel. But she was a hoot in American Hustle, and I keep hoping she will get more work.

I kinda stopped watching Law and Order and its numerous brethren well before it ended. Think Stephanie March had just come back to SVU last time I watched any of them.

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What's weird is that I liked her fine as Kate Lockely on "Angel" prior to this. 

Likewise. I mean, nobody on there was Emmy-quality, but she was competent. And I never watched L&O, so the vast Internet hate after her firing was just baffling.

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I liked Serena Southerlyn/Elisabeth Rohm, too.  And her exit was crazy stupid, but I rolled with it, like all the other change overs.

 

Mike Logan, I was fine with his exit, too.  I like him and Noth, but not as much as most the L&O fandom seems to.  He is not the "be all, end all" to me.

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Serena was terrible, but it was the writing as much as the acting for me. The Brach years are a mess, every fucking episode is A Mediation On The Red State/Blue State divide that Aaron Sorkin would deem excessive, and the Order half fell into this Three Little Pigs dynamic where every issue had Branch arguing for the Right, Serena spewing lefty talking points, and McCoy as the voice of reason. The characterization also went to shit around then. The characters stopped having personal lives, or inner lives, and became cardboard. Sam Waterston and Fred Dalton Thompson had the acting talent and charisma to pull it off, Rohm didn't even come close.

By the same token, Curtis was a weak point in the generally strong season 6-9 episodes. I didn't start watching the show until well intro the Ed Green years, but I caught up on reruns (I miss the A&E all-day marathons) and I always suspected that the reason they got rid of Logan was because they thought the Curtis character would attract more women to the show. He was written as the kind of focused-grouped romantic hero Hollywood thinks women like. He loves his wife and daughters! Devoted family man! Would never ever ever cheat on his wife or drink or do anything bad! Smugly lecturing everyone about his moral code and how they don't measure up! He was Greevey with a gym membership.

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The Serena episodes were where I gave up on L&O. I hated Elizabeth Rohm on Angel, but decided to give her a chance, because I'd been watching L&O forever, and sometimes a different show is all you need to see an actor in a better light...I watched two episodes and just couldn't go on...maybe it wouldn't have been so bad if she hadn't been replacing Angie Harmon. I always meant to pick it back up after I heard she left, but never got around to it.

I missed Logan when he was gone.

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I liked the Serena Southerlyn ep where the boyfriend kills his cheating girlfriend on Sept 10th, dumps his her body in Hell`s Kitchen , but drops her hand and her purse at the World Trade Centre on 9/11 where she worked, so everyone thinks she was killed in the attack. Serena figures out that the purse they found was an evening bag rather than a work purse, and it all points to what a sick SOB this boyfriend was. Otherwise, I found her sort of useless.

Chris Noth was great as Mike Logan, and seemed like a real cop. That episode where he investigates the priest who molested him and a bunch of the kids from his neighbourhood was amazing. Noth is just such a dude. He's not my favourite of the cops (that honour is Briscoe's) but he's pretty great.

 

I never heard they brought Curtis in to attract the ladies. Given that Noth's other big role is Mr. Big, I find that hilarious. I always thought it was because he got on the wrong side of Dick Wolf. Also, in the early years, that set was a bit war zone. Paul Sorvino and Michael Moriarty HATED each other. Noth has talked about what a breath of fresh air Orbach was because he would sing show tunes between takes. 

Edited by Pogojoco
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I remember an interview with one of the regulars, soon after he had joined the show, in which he talked about how the dialogue on the show was deceptively difficult to do smoothly and believably; lots of exposition and potential banality. It was an actor who came after Rohm, and his comments explained to me why she had been tolerable on Angel, but just awful most of the time on L&O.<br /><br />And I will never forget coming home from a late class, logging into the TWoP L&O forum, and realizing I needed to fire up the VCR immediately and FF to the end of the ep. One of my favorite threads ever, both for the "is this because" snark and the Rohm departure celebration.

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Serena figures out that the purse they found was an evening bag rather than a work purse, and it all points to what a sick SOB this boyfriend was. Otherwise, I found her sort of useless.

 

I never heard they brought Curtis in to attract the ladies. Given that Noth's other big role is Mr. Big, I find that hilarious. I always thought it was because he got on the wrong side of Dick Wolf. Also, in the early years, that set was a bit war zone. Paul Sorvino and Michael Moriarty HATED each other. Noth has talked about what a breath of fresh air Orbach was because he would sing show tunes between takes. 

Oh yeah. I forgot about those Legally Blonde knockoff plots the show did back then, where Serena figures it all out because she knows about fashion. There was another episode where she solves everything because she knows that only women's gloves have number sizes. Yet another example of shitty writing, where something happens at the last minute to render all the drama and ethical issues moot.

 

I never heard Curtis was brought in to attract women viewers either. It's just a theory I have. Remember how every episode would feature a pretty female suspect or witness flirting with him, and them he's tell them he was married?

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Why would you need a fireable offense to get rid of someone at the DA's office? Aren't they at-will employees?

As an ADA, yes,  Your boss can fire you without warning and for no reason at all, since we are at-will employees.  And in some offices, any political change (i.e. new DA, promotions above you) will also result in some people getting fired, or at least told to resign or be fired.

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He was Greevey with a gym membership.

 

Aw, leave Max alone. I didn't like him as much as I liked Cerreta, and Briscoe is obviously better than both of them, but at least Greevey said re adultery, "I don't judge, You can never know someone else's story."

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Southerlyn's exit was a hilarious WTF moment. Logan's was completely in character and, for me, devastating. I saw one episode of the Unacceptable Replacement the next season and quit watching the show for years. I've caught up with Curtis' seasons in re-runs on A&E and TNT, but still have never warmed to his smug, sanctimonious character.

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I don't think you can honestly say that Rohm's a bad actress. I think she's proved herself in many other roles; she surprised the hell out of me in American Hustle. But I think she was probably just the wrong actress for an already not very interesting character.

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Serena was terrible, but it was the writing as much as the acting for me. The Brach years are a mess, every fucking episode is A Mediation On The Red State/Blue State divide that Aaron Sorkin would deem excessive, and the Order half fell into this Three Little Pigs dynamic where every issue had Branch arguing for the Right, Serena spewing lefty talking points, and McCoy as the voice of reason. The characterization also went to shit around then. The characters stopped having personal lives, or inner lives, and became cardboard. Sam Waterston and Fred Dalton Thompson had the acting talent and charisma to pull it off, Rohm didn't even come close.

By the same token, Curtis was a weak point in the generally strong season 6-9 episodes. I didn't start watching the show until well intro the Ed Green years, but I caught up on reruns (I miss the A&E all-day marathons) and I always suspected that the reason they got rid of Logan was because they thought the Curtis character would attract more women to the show. He was written as the kind of focused-grouped romantic hero Hollywood thinks women like. He loves his wife and daughters! Devoted family man! Would never ever ever cheat on his wife or drink or do anything bad! Smugly lecturing everyone about his moral code and how they don't measure up! He was Greevey with a gym membership.

But Curtis DID cheat on his wife, once. In the episode Aftershock, where selected characters from the cast, & others, witness an execution (& then "play hooky" from work afterwards--perhaps because they're traumatized by what they saw). He cheated with a character played by Jennifer Garner. And he maybe wanted to cheat again, with the studio exec played by Lauren Graham, in the trilogy about the dismemberment murder of another female exec from the same Hollywood studio--he was even accused of it in open court in that case (& also in a case where Benjamin Bratt's then real life partner, Julia Roberts, played this looney tunes charity fundraiser involved in a murder by VIagra-related heart attack).

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On 12/18/2015 at 9:45 AM, Cobalt Stargazer said:

 

Aw, leave Max alone. I didn't like him as much as I liked Cerreta, and Briscoe is obviously better than both of them, but at least Greevey said re adultery, "I don't judge, You can never know someone else's story."

Unless you have an abortion, in which case he judges you all over the place.

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On 12/18/2015 at 8:13 AM, pbutler111 said:

I don't think you can honestly say that Rohm's a bad actress. I think she's proved herself in many other roles; she surprised the hell out of me in American Hustle. But I think she was probably just the wrong actress for an already not very interesting character.

Another poster said it elsewhere in this forum, but Rohm/Serena might have fared better had she not been chosen to replace Angie Harmon's Abbie Carmichael. I'm biased because I'm a diehard Abbie fan, but I think Harmon managed to breathe life into what could have been a very stock character and made her into a real person. Another actress might have been able to do the same for Southerlyn.

8 hours ago, Maherjunkie said:

Unless you have an abortion, in which case he judges you all over the place.

IMO, Curtis still far outstrips Greevey. I can never quite believe it Scrambled when he tells Briscoe and Van Buren that no one gets promised a happy ending, as if his own wife wasn't looking down the barrel of a long, slow decline. Anita should have thrown a desk lamp at him.

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They are investigating a murder involving artificial insemination eggs, and talking about how not everyone can have children the old-fashioned way.  Anita says something about how her sister couldn't have kids and it was really hard, and Curtis pops up with the "No one is promised a happy ending.  Maybe some people just aren't meant to be parents."  I'm still shocked that the look Anita gave him didn't drop him in his tracks.

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5 hours ago, Ailianna said:

They are investigating a murder involving artificial insemination eggs, and talking about how not everyone can have children the old-fashioned way.  Anita says something about how her sister couldn't have kids and it was really hard, and Curtis pops up with the "No one is promised a happy ending.  Maybe some people just aren't meant to be parents."  I'm still shocked that the look Anita gave him didn't drop him in his tracks.

You would think with his wife suffering with MS Rey would be sympathetic to other people going through health struggles but Rey continued to be sanctimonious and downright bitter. If I can't have a happy ending, why should you?

I like growth in characters, especially if they made a mistake and learn from it but that didn't seem to happen with Rey. He cheats on his wife and during their separation where he wants to get back with Debra, he's flirting and having dinner with a Hollywood exec. In his last season, Rey spends the night with Julia Roberts' character. Nothing happened, but I thought it was crazy Rey didn't think he should cover his bases in case it blows up in his face which it did in court. Sometimes Rey was too stupid for his own good.

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On 7/17/2016 at 0:13 PM, Cobalt Stargazer said:

Another poster said it elsewhere in this forum, but Rohm/Serena might have fared better had she not been chosen to replace Angie Harmon's Abbie Carmichael. I'm biased because I'm a diehard Abbie fan, but I think Harmon managed to breathe life into what could have been a very stock character and made her into a real person. Another actress might have been able to do the same for Southerlyn.

IMO, Curtis still far outstrips Greevey. I can never quite believe it Scrambled when he tells Briscoe and Van Buren that no one gets promised a happy ending, as if his own wife wasn't looking down the barrel of a long, slow decline. Anita should have thrown a desk lamp at him.

It's ironic (I had the brew, she had the chronic): I liked Angi Harmon's acting better than Rohm's, but I didn't like Abbie as a character. I liked Serena better as the A.D.A., but Rohm's line delivery was always very wooden. If I knew how, I'd string together a clip of Serena asking judges for remand, and every one would sound exactly alike. 

And I agree that Curtis was worse than Greevey. I found Max to be a good little former alter boy trying to stay on the moral path, but he never seemed as judgmental as Curtis. Curtis even turned up his nose up at Lennie on a regular basis--his own partner! And Lennie never judged him, not even when he found out about the affair. In fact, he said Curtis's only real mistake was telling his wife about it. Heh-heh. I don't think Lennie was saying that adultery is okay, but Curtis told him it was a one-time thing that he'd never repeat. And that's why Lennie thought it was stupid to tell his wife about it. 

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Actually Lennie told Curtis telling his wife was his second mistake--the first being the cheating, the second hurting Debra and their relationship for no reason--if it really was a one time thing and would never happen again.  I don't think Lennie condoned the cheating, but having been through rough relationship waters himself, I think he was trying to say that Curtis confessed to make himself feel better, not to do something for Debra.

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