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Small Talk: Out of Genoa

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Address at the Conclusion of the Selma to Montgomery March -- Dr.Martin Luther King, Jr. -- March 25, 1965

Look out your window, the weather stinks.

Stress relievers -- 

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The Kaiser is dead. Long live Chanel.

-- His contribution to fashion was not in creating a new silhouette […] Rather, he created a new kind of designer: the shape-shifter. That is to say, the creative force who lands at the top of a heritage brand and reinvents it by identifying its sartorial semiology and then wresting it into the present with a healthy dose of disrespect and a dollop of pop culture. Not that he put it that way exactly. What he said was: “Chanel is an institution, and you have to treat an institution like a whore — and then you get something out of her.” 

This approach has become almost quotidian in the industry, but before Mr. Lagerfeld was hired at Chanel, when the brand was fading into staid irrelevance kept aloft on a raft of perfume and cosmetics, it was a new and startling idea.That he dared act on it, and then kept doing so with varying degrees of success for decades, transformed not only the fortunes of Chanel (now said to have revenues of over $4 billion a year) but also his own profile.

And it cleared a new path for designers who came after, from Tom Ford (who likewise transformed Gucci) to John Galliano (Dior), Riccardo Tisci (Givenchy, Burberry) and Tomas Maier (Bottega Veneta).

Those who wanted to dismiss Mr. Lagerfeld referred to him as a “styliste”: a designer who creates his looks by repurposing what already exists, as opposed to inventing anything new. But he rejected the idea of fashion-as-art, and the designer-as-tortured genius. His goal was more opportunistic.

“I would like to be a one-man multinational fashion phenomenon,” he once said.

Indeed, his output as a designer was rivaled only by his outpourings as a master of the telling aphorism — so much so that his quotations were collected in a book, “The World According to Karl,” in 2013.

Some choice excerpts: “Sweatpants are a sign of defeat,” and “I’m very much down to earth. Just not this earth.”

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Sounds like his cat is gonna be ok though.

 The four-legged, Siamese kitty's life was forever changed when Lagerfield   became her owner. Not only was she showered with presents, like catnip and caviar, but she also garnered a multi-million dollar net worth. 

From InStyle

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today is hubby and i's anniversary..46 yrs.

we are heading off to the mainland for a couple of days..hubs is going to a hockey game tomorrow night..canucks vs arizona whatever they are.

leaving for ferry at 9am.

LOL  i always get in such a tizzy getting ready to go away..excitement i guess.

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2 minutes ago, valleycliffe said:

today is hubby and i's anniversary..46 yrs.

we are heading off to the mainland for a couple of days..hubs is going to a hockey game tomorrow night..canucks vs arizona whatever they are.

leaving for ferry at 9am.

LOL  i always get in such a tizzy getting ready to go away..excitement i guess.

Wow! Congrats on 46 years. I hope you have a great trip.

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4 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

Sounds like his cat is gonna be ok though.

 The four-legged, Siamese kitty's life was forever changed when Lagerfield   became her owner. Not only was she showered with presents, like catnip and caviar, but she also garnered a multi-million dollar net worth. 

From InStyle

MAIN-Karl-Lagerfeld-and-Choupette.jpg

Choupette made Uncle Karl almost seem humane … almost.

May Choupette's feasts always be fancy.

4 hours ago, valleycliffe said:

today is hubby and i's anniversary..46 yrs.

we are heading off to the mainland for a couple of days..hubs is going to a hockey game tomorrow night..canucks vs arizona whatever they are.

leaving for ferry at 9am.

LOL  i always get in such a tizzy getting ready to go away..excitement i guess.

Congratulations Mr. and Mrs. Valleycliffe!

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Founding Fathers is a full-length documentary film about the history of hip hop narrated by Public Enemy’s Chuck D. History says that hip hop originated in the Bronx. What this film presupposes is that hip hop started earlier in places like Brooklyn with DJs like Grandmaster Flowers.

Tortoise feared extinct found on remote Galapagos island

Dog reunited with family 101 days after California wildfire

Edited by Cupid Stunt
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Musician Peter Tork, known as the keyboardist and bass player of The Monkees, has died at age 77.

The news was confirmed in a statement on Tork's official Facebook page, which read, "It is with beyond-heavy and broken hearts that we share the devastating news that our friend, mentor, teacher, and amazing soul, Peter Tork, has passed from this world. "We want to thank each and every one of you for your love, dedication and support of our “boss.” Having you in our world has meant so very much to all of us. Please know that Peter was extremely appreciative of you, his Torkees, and one of his deepest joys was to be out in front of you, playing his music, and seeing you enjoy what he had to share. We send blessings and thoughts of comfort to you all, with much gratitude."

The cause of death remains unknown. In 2009 Tork was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer called adenoid cystic carcinoma, which affected his tongue.

Peter Halsten Thorkelson was born in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 13, 1942. His mother was a homemaker, and his father — an Army officer who served in the military government in Berlin after World War II — was an economics professor who joined the University of Connecticut in 1950, leading the family to settle in the town of Mansfield. Connecticut. His parents collected folk records and bought him a guitar and banjo when he was a boy. Peter went on to take piano lessons and studied French horn at Carleton College in Northfield, Minn., where he reportedly flunked out twice before settling in New York during the early Sixties Greenwich Village folk scene, where he befriended a pre-fame Stephen Stills. Once they both moved to Los Angeles, Stills told Tork about a TV show looking to cast a Beatles-like band. “I remember Stephen saying to me, ‘They like me but they think my hair and teeth won’t work for television,'” Tork told Rolling Stone in 2011. “I said, ‘Yeah, yeah, thanks Stephen’ and hung up without any intention of going to the audition. He called me again and said, ‘No, no, you really have to do this.’ I never would have gone had it not been for Stephen.”

Tork became part of The Monkees with Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith and Davy Jones in the mid-sixties, when the group was formed as America’s Beatles counterpart. All four were selected from more than 400 applicants to play in the associated TV series The Monkees, which aired between 1966 and 1968.

Tork, a gifted musician, was the oldest member of the quartet. Tork played a lovable dimwit on the Monkees TV show, but in real life, he was an accomplished songwriter and guitarist/bassist that played on many of their key recordings and wrote numerous songs for the group, including “Can You Dig It?” and “For Pete’s Sake.”

“I was hired to be an actor on a TV show,” he told Rolling Stone in 2016. “The producers did have hopes that something musical would come out of us when they cast the four of us. But if we couldn’t have done the music, they would have been alright with us just making the TV show.” That’s not how it happened, though. Contrary to the persistent belief that the Monkees didn’t play their own instruments, Tork played guitar and bass on their earliest recordings – including “Papa Gene’s Blues” and “Sweet Young Thing” – even though Monkees music supervisor Don Kirshner would have preferred to leave everything completely in the hands of session pros. “I never objected to Kirshner’s song-picking abilities,” Tork told Rolling Stone in 2012. “It was obvious he knew how to pick a hit. All I wanted to do was be the musician in the studio. I wanted to be the sideman on my own album.”

Together, Tork, Dolenz, Nesmith and Jones delivered many Billboard Hot 100 hits. ”I’m a Believer”, composed by Neil Diamond, “Daydream Believer” and “Last Train to Clarksville” all rose to the top place of the chart. Almost all of their early material was penned by a stable of vaunted songwriters that included Carole King, Gerry Goffin, Neil Diamond, David Gates, Neil Sedaka, Jeff Barry, Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. But while the band scored a total of six Top 10 songs and five Top 10 albums, they engendered as much critical scorn as commercial success. In one typical review, music critic Richard Goldstein declared, “The Monkees are as unoriginal as anything yet thrust upon us in the name of popular music.”

Tork left The Monkees in the late sixties, after the group had released six albums. The last album to feature the original Monkees line-up in that decade is Head, which came out in 1968. In the late eighties, however, Tork reunited with Dolenz and Jones to release the album Pool It! The group occasionally went on tour and did TV appearances, and in 1996 all four members collaborated again for the album Justus. Jones died in 2012 aged 66. Tork, Dolenz and Nesmith released an album together, called Good Times!, in 2016, followed by a Christmas album in October 2018.

A musical polymath who could play banjo, guitar, keyboards, piano, bass and organ, Tork produced his 1994 solo album Stranger Things Have Happened, releasing Cambria Hotel in 2007 and the blues-based tribute to the music of Lead Belly, Relax Your Mind, in 2018. He also performed with his various side projects, Shoe Suede Blues, The Dashboard Saints and The Peter Tork Project throughout the 1980, '90s and early 2000s.

When Tork announced his cancer diagnosis in 2009, he described it in a statement published by the Oral Cancer Foundation as a “bad news, good news situation. It’s so rare a combination (on the tongue) that there isn’t a lot of experience among the medical community about this particular combination,” he added. “On the other hand, the type of cancer it is, never mind the location, is somewhat well known, and the prognosis, I’m told, is good.”

In 2012 he was given the all-clear after being diagnosed with a rare form of tongue cancer three years earlier, telling UKMusicReviews, "They carved it out of me and I have recovered solely from all of that. However it still requires attention on a regular basis; it doesn’t interfere terribly but that’s life.  What I am trying to say is that I am as well as could be hoped for, life goes on like this. In fact I have to say that I am an extraordinarily well favoured human on the face of the earth and I am very grateful for that."

Tork’s marriages to Jody Babb, Reine Stewart and Barbara Iannoli ended in divorce. He is survived by his wife, Pamela Grapes; a daughter, Hallie, from his second marriage; a son, Ivan, from his third marriage; a daughter, Erica, from a relationship with Tammy Sustek; a brother; and a sister.

Rest in Peace, Peter.

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9 hours ago, Cupid Stunt said:

Musician Peter Tork, known as the keyboardist and bass player of The Monkees, has died at age 77.

Man, I loved the Monkees. I still have the notebook containing all the words to their songs. I would sit in front of my portable record player, moving the needle over and over to hear all the words. I liked Peter the best. Does anyone else remember calling him Woolhat?

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NAACP History: Carter G. Woodson

-- We owe the celebration of Black History Month, and more importantly, the study of black history, to Dr. Carter G. Woodson. Born to parents who were former slaves, he spent his childhood working in the Kentucky coal mines and enrolled in high school at age twenty. He graduated within two years and later went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. The scholar was disturbed to find in his studies that history books largely ignored the black American population-and when black people did figure into the picture, it was generally in ways that reflected the inferior social position they were assigned at the time.

Woodson, always one to act on his ambitions, decided to take on the challenge of writing black Americans into the nation's history. He established the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (now called the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History) in 1915, and a year later founded the widely respected Journal of Negro History. In 1926, he launched Negro History Week as an initiative to bring national attention to the contributions of black people throughout American history.

Woodson chose the second week of February for Negro History Week because it marks the birthdays of two men who greatly influenced the black American population, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. However, February has much more than Douglass and Lincoln to show for its significance in black American history. For example:

  • February 23, 1868: W. E. B. DuBois, important civil rights leader and co-founder of the NAACP, was born.
  • February 3, 1870: The 15th Amendment was passed, granting black citizens the right to vote.
  • February 25, 1870: The first black U.S. senator, Hiram R. Revels (1822-1901), took his oath of office.
  • February 12, 1909: The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was founded by a group of concerned black and white citizens in New York City.
  • February 1, 1960: In what would become a civil-rights movement milestone, a group of black Greensboro, N.C., college students began a sit-in at a segregated Woolworth's lunch counter.
  • February 21, 1965: Malcolm X, the militant leader who promoted Black Nationalism, was shot to death by three Black Muslims.

 Wallace Broecker, the geophysicist who popularized the term 'global warming,' has died

Today is Steve Irwin's 57th birthday.

Records are being broken in Arizona and it unexpectedly snowed in Los Angeles. -- My parents in Owens Valley have had 18+ inches of snow. When there's a cold snap in SoCal. The mothballed winter clothes from transplant's original homelands are broken out and a throwback fashion show of mid-1990s parkas and ski gear hits the parking lots and drive thru-s of LA. Good times.

World's Biggest Bee Rediscovered in Wild

biggest-bee.jpeg

Ouch!

Edited by Cupid Stunt
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10 hours ago, valleycliffe said:

first time i laid eyes on him, i was crossing the road and he was in a car waiting for the light to turn green...

Lovely. It was Kismet and meant to be.

2 hours ago, AngelKitty said:

Man, I loved the Monkees. I still have the notebook containing all the words to their songs. I would sit in front of my portable record player, moving the needle over and over to hear all the words. I liked Peter the best. Does anyone else remember calling him Woolhat?

My sister was gaga for the Monkees. My mother still has boxes of her old Tiger Beat and 16 Magazines. I liked them because it was infectious pop music and their show was live-action cartoon fun.

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6 minutes ago, Cupid Stunt said:

Lovely. It was Kismet and meant to be.

LOL  yes, it was.

i had kept walking down townline road and the next thing i knew a car pulled up next to me and out came the age old line "hi honey, want a ride?".  and i said NO.

different time tho.  1968.  nowadays i would have called 911 and said i had a stalker following me..😅

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Bummer, jewel21.  Get better!

Thought I had the flu couple of weeks ago but it turned out I had an ulcer (never knew I had one), it started bleeding and I got a nice ride in that shiny little red truck with the purdy lights.  5 days in ICU , 3 endoscopies and 4 pints of blood later I'm home...thank you Jesus.  Still low energy but getting my strength back.

I can eat anything I want except chocolate and alcohol *insert sad emoji*

I was jonesin' for y'all's snark (I could watch in the hospital) and when I got home I saw the new format and thought something was wrong with my computer...;-).  Then I read it was offline during the changeover so I didn't miss too much.

One thing I still can't figure out is how to get to a show forum I want to read.  I followed the steps (confusing to me) tried to type in Survivor and got nowhere.  I miss the big list you could just scroll thru and select.  Any tips?

eta...I forgot two things.  Happy Anniversary valleycliffe and have a great trip!

Loved The Monkees, too and Peter was my favorite.  First records I gave to boychild when he was about 8.  Couple of years ago they were rerunning them on MeTV and I watched them all again.  Just cute, corny and fun.

Mike Nesmith was Woolhat.  He almost always wore a toboggan. 

Edited by OhioSongbird

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