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Small Talk: Out of Genoa

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On 2/3/2019 at 11:06 PM, Gemini Gipsy said:

You make it to the gulf side a lot?

Not at all. I'm an East Coast girl all the way, though I did spend maybe a week at Marco Island nearly thirty years ago and traveled up the West Coast all the way to the end of the Panhandle. The beaches are nice, just not the same. 

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Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Eulogy for the Reverend James Reeb

 

 

 

 

Happy New Year! It's the Year of the Pig! -- Pot Stickers for everyone!

 

The seller's have accepted the offer on the townhouse, and the title company said it will take 2 weeks to finalize the paperwork. Nana volunteered furnishings she has in storage, so the decorator and I will be taking in the sights of her cold storage unit tonight. 

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On 12/30/2018 at 12:12 PM, Petunia13 said:

Go California ❤️ they are banning the sale of pet dogs, cats and rabbits and becoming a rescue only state! This is wonderful news! In the Netherlands they’ve had the same policy a long time and because of that no animal euthanasia!!! 

Somehow, I missed this despite living in San Diego.

I honestly thought these places were illegal already, tbh. Like I'd seen a few puppy stores pop up in National City (a suburb of San Diego near the naval Base) and one opened up in a mall and that was the first two stores I'd seen selling puppies out the window since I was in grade school.

At any rate, good riddance. Puppy Mills are godawful. I know a shelter dog is not for everyone and they can require work for issues that aren't always obvious at the pound (like food aggression--my niece and nephew can't even feed their smallest dog and they've had him  for....oh, five years now), but at least a reputable breeder will ask basic questions about the home and tell them if the dog is right for them. Some even have customers sign spay/neuter agreements and will offer to re-home the puppy if for whatever reason it doesn't work out.

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Way too many dogs and cats are killed senselessly in shelters and pounds. Gorgeous loving interesting souls who don’t understand what they did wrong. That and the abuse and torture of animals by evil people break my heart. 

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6 minutes ago, Petunia13 said:

Way too many dogs and cats are killed senselessly in shelters and pounds. Gorgeous loving interesting souls who don’t understand what they did wrong. That and the abuse and torture of animals by evil people break my heart. 

Me too. It brings out a violent urge that I didn't know I had.

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23 hours ago, peacheslatour said:

It brings out a violent urge that I didn't know I had.

 

Seriously. I'm a firm believer in doing unto others, especially when it comes to animal abuse. It makes me physically and emotionally sick when I hear about it and I just want to hug every dog/cat and let them know they're loved.

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Remembering J Dilla On His 45th Birthday

On his 32nd birthday, February 7, 2006, J Dilla (born James Dewitt Yancey, in Detroit, MI) released an unusual instrumental album called Donuts. Three days later, he was dead, from complications of lupus. Since then, February 7 has become an especially important day for fans of Dilla and Donuts, and this year (which would have been his 45th birthday) was is different.

His local alt-weekly, the Metro Times, gathered a collection of memories from other top producers and collaborators, including Q-Tip, DJ Jazzy Jeff, and T3 from Slum Village, the underground hip-hop group to which Dilla belonged for years.

At High High Snobiety, Danny Schwartz published a lengthy tribute to and analysis of Dilla’s contributions to musical history:

"J Dilla operated within the rich tradition of sampling, and like many other hip-hop producers, he used the MPC to layer jazz, soul, fusion, and other styles of music on top of breakbeats. What distinguished Dilla from everyone else was his holistic approach that imbued his massive production catalogue with a dynamic range of sounds and textures. His most important innovation was that he turned off the ‘quantize’ feature of the MPC, so that his kicks and hats might arrive significantly before or after the beat. To put it another way, he loosened his beats from their rhythmic bedrock; they were not rigid, but gambled forward with a woozy lilt. One could easily argue that Dilla and Lex Luger influenced the rhythmic sensibilities of pop music more than anyone else since funk drummers like James Brown’s Clyde Stubblefield. Dilla was a perfectionist, and his rhythmic idiosyncrasies, however off-grid, were perfectly calibrated; like Gandalf, he arrived precisely when he meant to."

Vox put together a nice little video specifically about Dilla’s idiosyncratic, influential use of his MPC3000: How J Dilla humanized his MPC3000

A 2006 feature in The Fader has memories from everyone from Madlib to Erykah Badu, but Dilla’s mother Maureen Yancey (affectionately known as “Ma Dukes”) talks specifically about Donuts, probably Dilla’s most famous album (although you’re sure to start a fight if you call it or any other of his albums his “best”):

"I knew he was working on a series of beat CDs before he came to Los Angeles. Donuts was a special project that he hadn’t named yet. This was the tail end of his “Dill Withers” phase, while he was living in Clinton Township, Michigan. You see, musically he went into different phases. He’d start on a project, go back, go buy more records and then go back to working on the project again. I saw it because I was at his house every day, all day. I would go there for breakfast, go back to Detroit to check on the daycare business I was running, and then back to his house for lunch and dinner. He was on a special diet and he was a funny eater anyway. He had to take 15 different medications, we would split them up between meals, and every other day we would binge on a brownie sundae from Big Boys. That was his treat.

I didn’t know about the actual album Donuts until I came to Los Angeles to stay indefinitely. I got a glimpse of the music during one of the hospital stays, around his 31st birthday, when [friend and producer] House Shoes came out from Detroit to visit him. I would sneak in and listen to the work in progress while he was in dialysis. He got furious when he found out I was listening to his music! He didn’t want me to listen to anything until it was a finished product. He was working in the hospital. He tried to go over each beat and make sure that it was something different and make sure that there was nothing that he wanted to change. “Lightworks,” oh yes, that was something! That’s one of the special ones. It was so different. It blended classical music (way out there classical), commercial and underground at the same time."

Dilla’s influence on contemporary hip-hop artists, especially the emerging subgenre of lo-fi hip-hop, also called “chill-hop,” “jazzy hip-hop,” or the more specific “lo-fi hip-hop radio for studying, relaxing, and gaming,” lo-fi hip-hop has become a subgenre and subculture. It’s a subgenre featuring instrumentals rooted in the melancholy melodies of jazz and boom-bap drums of golden age hip-hop.

Playlists dedicated to lo-fi hip-hop can be found on music streaming services but YouTube serves as its primary base (with a looped image of an anime scene often being featured.) Channels like Chillhop Music, ChilledCow, and Private ChillOut offer 24/7 streams of the subgenre — the subscriber count anywhere from 102,000 to 2,500,000. Through these channels, the aesthetic of lo-fi hip-hop is best experienced. Fans from across the world listen to the tracks and engage with each other in real time, all while a looped image of an animated character writing or working on a laptop is featured.

Hanif Abdurraqib has this unforgettable anecdote:

"At summer's end, 2005, Dilla found himself in a hospital bed at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles, the same hospital that The Notorious B.I.G. and Easy-E died. He had lost the ability to walk and could barely talk. His own body was killing him and there was little to be done about it.

Sensing death was coming, he told his mother he needed his equipment in the hospital with him. Ma Dukes asked his friends from Stones Throw Records to lug his turntables, mixer, crates of records, MPC, and computer into his room. When his hands were too swollen, Ma Dukes would massage his stiffened fingers, so Dilla could work on the tracks, letting the doctors listen to the beats through the headphones.

Sometimes he would ask Ma Dukes to move him from the hospital bed to a reclining chair so he could work more comfortably. His only focus was finishing the album. Donuts was released on Stones Throw on February 7, 2006, his 32nd birthday. Dilla died three days later."

We miss you, Jay. You should still be here.

Edited by Cupid Stunt
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OMG, I missed this site so much! I always read the forums for a couple of hours before bed to unwind and I didn't know what to do with myself while the site was down. I had problems sleeping too as a result. Never do this again to me, Previously TV. 

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6 hours ago, Petunia13 said:

I missed you guys ❤️💕❤️

4 hours ago, jewel21 said:

OMG, I missed this site so much! I always read the forums for a couple of hours before bed to unwind and I didn't know what to do with myself while the site was down. I had problems sleeping too as a result. Never do this again to me, Previously TV. 

Me too!  I kept checking back in to see if maybe it was back up.

I don't know how to quit you, preverts!!

Edited by boes
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1 hour ago, boes said:

Me too!  I kept checking back in to see if maybe it was back up.

I don't know you to quit you, preverts!!

Me neither! 

The Interwebs were diminished without Preverts to share with.

Cookie Monster is the most orally challenged but also the most literarily adept muppet. But even with those cards on the table, this Reddit Ask Me Anything is something special.

Q: Is there anything you won’t eat? I mean, I’ve seen you eat a typewriter before…

A: Me stay away from anything in Oscar’s trashcan. Otherwise me not picky.

Q: My 7-year-old daughter is about to start selling cookies for Girl Scouts. Do you have any advice for her?

A: Don’t eat the product!

Q: There’s been a lot of famous people who have come to visit you and your friends on Sesame Street! Did any of those guests give you a cookie?

A: Me friends have surprised me with lots of cookies! Sir Ian Mckellan even gave me two cookies!

Q: Who would you most like to sing a “C is for Cookie” duet with?

A: Me would love to sing duet with Lady Gaga. Me and me friends are monsters after all. Me hope she see dis!

Q: What is the optimum number of chocolate chips per cookie?

A: Me always say the more the merrier. Me think me need at least 3.14 chocolate chippies per nom nom. MMM pi

Q: If you could only eat one type of cookie for the rest of your life, what would it be?

A: Wow! Me didn’t realize these question be so hard. If me had to choose just one cookie, me would have to pick me Mommy’s classic chocolate chippie!

Q: We know cookies are your favourite food. What is your second favourite food?

A: Can me say more cookies…?
A2: Me thought it over. Definitely “more cookies.”

Q: My son is your biggest fan in the world. His name is Nico and he’s almost 2. Any words of advice for him???

A: Me think it important to always share your cookies. Me know it hard to do sometimes, but it da kind thing to do.
A2: Oh, and HI NICO! Me love you!

Q: What was it like working with Jim Henson?

A: Me never sure what he did, but he always around to lend a hand and give me cookie!

Q: How’s the rent on Sesame Street?

A: Me think you confused…. Rent played on different street, me think Broadway?

-- It goes on and on like this. Maybe I’m too much of a softie (probably underbaked … Ack! It’s contagious), but I love this.

Edited by Cupid Stunt
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Me friends have surprised me with lots of cookies! Sir Ian Mckellan even gave me two cookies!

My favorite Cookie Monster/celebrity interaction was when he was on Martha Stewart's show and of course she made cookies. He wouldn't stay out of them so she tied him to a chair. As he was trying to get away she said "If you struggle, the ropes just get tighter." My son turned to me and said ""I guess somehow we've always knew those words would come out of her mouth sooner or later,"

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Aww, poor frozen kitty!  I'm so glad she survived, but I hate to think of all the animals that didn't.  After our big thaw last week, I found a mole in my yard that must have frozen in its tracks during our crazy cold spell.  

So it looks like you have to hit the ❤ twice for it to register now.  Sheesh, that's like a cardio workout for me!

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6 hours ago, valleycliffe said:

so happy the site is back online but will have to get used to the new formatting...

I wasn't used to the last new formatting! 🙃

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 I think the print size is way too small and I hate having to enlarge just for this site. A lot of us are older, wear glasses and still need the print to be bigger. Please consider this. 

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I kinda like there’s more reactions. I have a feeling a few of you will get more “funny” or “useful” clicks now. 

@Snaporaz I’m like you I always worry about the wildlife in the extreme cold or extreme heat or storms or wildfires.  A couple weeks ago a picture circulated on Facebook and Twitter of a dog frozen solid curled up fetal position. I believe a pregnant beagle. The caption was “plastic igloos aren’t adequate bring them inside!” 

It’s insane there’s asshole owners do this. Tragic it was found too late by bystanders or animal control. Where’s the decency?

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In 1948, James Baldwin left New York for Europe, where he would stay for several years. He returned in the late 1950s to immerse himself in the American civil rights movement. During that time he became a cultural star, a political fixture (within black activism, a controversial one), and one of the grand moral prose rhetoricians.

In the process he also disappeared from public view as a knowable, relatable person, someone still wrestling with conflicted ideas about race, sexuality, power, family, and his own creativity (he wanted to make films but never did); someone who could describe himself, in his late 40s, as “an ageing, lonely, sexually dubious, politically outrageous, unspeakably erratic freak.”…

He was skeptical of uplift. As a teenager he left preaching, he said, after he came to see it as just another form of theater. My guess is he sometimes felt the same about the salvational spirit of the early civil rights movement. To the very end, he was negative in his assessment of progress made. “The present social and political apparatus cannot serve the human need,” he wrote bluntly in his final book, “The Evidence of Things Not Seen” (1985). He believed in the positive potential of community, though “in the United States the idea of community scarcely means anything anymore, except among the submerged, the Native American, the Mexican, the Puerto Rican, the Black” — the one hopeful word here being “except.”

“I have had my bitter moments, certainly,” he once said, “but I do not think I can usefully be called a bitter man.” I think he can usefully be called a hero. When I was a kid I felt he was one because of what I took to be his furious moral certainty. Now I look to him for his furious uncertainty. And I still have my copy, time softened with touching, of “Notes of a Native Son,” with him on the cover, his face furrow-browed but dreamy, his gaze fixed somewhere outside camera range.

It’s also useful to explore the ways that Baldwin came up short—usually, moments where he was honest about his own limitations. There are plenty in this nearly two-hour conversation with poet and activist Nikki Giovanni:

James Baldwin has been such a formative influence on me that it’s hard to remember a time when his writings haven’t been on my mind. As I get older, I become more and more aware of how acute of a cultural critic he was, writing not just about books, but about movies, television, theater, and more. He was clearly one of the most penetrating thinkers about race, sexuality, literature, and their entwining in American culture. I consider him one of greatest minds the American continent produced, and this is a part of the world that has not gone untouched by genius. He was a phenomenal stylist; it’s impossible to read him for very long without finding his inflections and rhythms invading your own. And a great storyteller, capable of mixing styles and registers in a way that would have done Shakespeare proud.

James Baldwin is getting his due as an essential voice not just of the 20th century, but also of the 21st—a bridge not very many of his generation (or the one before or after) managed to cross. A great line from the book "If Beale Street Could Talk" that didn’t make it into the movie: “Whoever discovered America deserved to be dragged home, in chains, to die.” -- " If Beale Street Could Talk" was finished on Columbus Day, and Baldwin was picking a fight with Saul Bellow (who modeled his Augie March (The Adventures of Augie March) on Columbus in his own attempt to tell an all-American novel. It is a fight that badly needed to be picked then, and needs to be picked still.

Like chess players, these crows can plan several steps ahead -- New Caledonian crows can use tools like sticks and stones, in a pre-planned fashion, to accomplish a goal.

Edited by Cupid Stunt
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3 hours ago, Cupid Stunt said:

In 1948, James Baldwin left New York for Europe, where he would stay for several years. He returned in the late 1950s to immerse himself in the American civil rights movement. During that time he became a cultural star, a political fixture (within black activism, a controversial one), and one of the grand moral prose rhetoricians.

In the process he also disappeared from public view as a knowable, relatable person, someone still wrestling with conflicted ideas about race, sexuality, power, family, and his own creativity (he wanted to make films but never did); someone who could describe himself, in his late 40s, as “an ageing, lonely, sexually dubious, politically outrageous, unspeakably erratic freak.”…

He was skeptical of uplift. As a teenager he left preaching, he said, after he came to see it as just another form of theater. My guess is he sometimes felt the same about the salvational spirit of the early civil rights movement. To the very end, he was negative in his assessment of progress made. “The present social and political apparatus cannot serve the human need,” he wrote bluntly in his final book, “The Evidence of Things Not Seen” (1985). He believed in the positive potential of community, though “in the United States the idea of community scarcely means anything anymore, except among the submerged, the Native American, the Mexican, the Puerto Rican, the Black” — the one hopeful word here being “except.”

“I have had my bitter moments, certainly,” he once said, “but I do not think I can usefully be called a bitter man.” I think he can usefully be called a hero. When I was a kid I felt he was one because of what I took to be his furious moral certainty. Now I look to him for his furious uncertainty. And I still have my copy, time softened with touching, of “Notes of a Native Son,” with him on the cover, his face furrow-browed but dreamy, his gaze fixed somewhere outside camera range.

It’s also useful to explore the ways that Baldwin came up short—usually, moments where he was honest about his own limitations. There are plenty in this nearly two-hour conversation with poet and activist Nikki Giovanni:

James Baldwin has been such a formative influence on me that it’s hard to remember a time when his writings haven’t been on my mind. As I get older, I become more and more aware of how acute of a cultural critic he was, writing not just about books, but about movies, television, theater, and more. He was clearly one of the most penetrating thinkers about race, sexuality, literature, and their entwining in American culture. I consider him one of greatest minds the American continent produced, and this is a part of the world that has not gone untouched by genius. He was a phenomenal stylist; it’s impossible to read him for very long without finding his inflections and rhythms invading your own. And a great storyteller, capable of mixing styles and registers in a way that would have done Shakespeare proud.

James Baldwin is getting his due as an essential voice not just of the 20th century, but also of the 21st—a bridge not very many of his generation (or the one before or after) managed to cross. A great line from the book "If Beale Street Could Talk" that didn’t make it into the movie: “Whoever discovered America deserved to be dragged home, in chains, to die.” -- " If Beale Street Could Talk" was finished on Columbus Day, and Baldwin was picking a fight with Saul Bellow (who modeled his Augie March (The Adventures of Augie March) on Columbus in his own attempt to tell an all-American novel. It is a fight that badly needed to be picked then, and needs to be picked still.

Like chess players, these crows can plan several steps ahead -- New Caledonian crows can use tools like sticks and stones, in a pre-planned fashion, to accomplish a goal.

Thanks for bringing over Kinohi Nishikawa's essay - it can't be read enough IMO.  "Beale Street" was pretty wonderful.

Edited by boes
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7 hours ago, boes said:

Thanks for bringing over Kinohi Nishikawa's essay - it can't be read enough IMO.  "Beale Street" was pretty wonderful.

Thanks for the leg up, boes.

I tried to edit the Baldwin post with the correct link numerous times but the new format wouldn't let me ... Frustrating.

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On 2/9/2019 at 6:24 PM, Gam2 said:

 I think the print size is way too small and I hate having to enlarge just for this site. A lot of us are older, wear glasses and still need the print to be bigger. Please consider this. 

At the bottom of the board there's a theme menu which includes options for different font sizes like small, medium and large. The large option seems like the medium option before the revamp though.

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I hate change and I'm not feeling this new layout. Maybe I have to play around with the font size, but I find myself only visiting the site for short periods of time before losing interest whereas before I could spend hours on this site. 

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11 hours ago, Jaded said:

At the bottom of the board there's a theme menu which includes options for different font sizes like small, medium and large. The large option seems like the medium option before the revamp though.

yep, it worked...my font size is now light large..   looks a lot better.

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When Martin Luther King Came to Harlem  -- "Less than a year before his assassination, the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. came to Harlem. In the June 22, 1967, Village Voice, contributor Marlene Nadle observed the crowd anxiously awaiting the Baptist minister’s arrival … her coverage of the speech revealed that King’s words were very important. He was unafraid to speak to America’s most powerful interests — at his growing peril. Nadle relates his principled opposition to the Vietnam War: “ ‘Who appointed this country divine agent to the world?’ he asked. ‘Who gave it the arrogance to try to fix up another country when it hasn’t put its own house in order? How can it expect its black soldiers to fight in brutal solidarity with whites in Vietnam and then come home and not be able to live on the same block with them?’ ”

SF fire station says they're being asked to get rid of their beloved cat. But they want her to stay.

920x920.jpg

Save Edna!

Sidewalk Talk -- Traci Ruble: The Power of Listening to Strangers on Streets

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For the Lovers …

For those that Mourn ...

A year after high school shooting, Florida town still struggling

NASA rover finally bites the dust on Mars after 15 years

For the Sceptics … 

The most costly scam is love, warns the FTC

The hidden environmental cost of Valentine’s Day roses

The history of dating reveals how consumerism has hijacked courtship

ab2810e27802f29ad7d194287cd65c3e--anti-v

For Chocolate Lovers ...

For those of you in the Dog House ...

2379_Bizarro_02142014_original.gif?14235

You know who you are ...

Happy St. Valentine's Day!

Edited by Cupid Stunt
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I know this is the small talk thread but why all of the news/flashbacks to old news here? I thought we were supposed to just chit chat or talk about the show.

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1 hour ago, Gam2 said:

I know this is the small talk thread but why all of the news/flashbacks to old news here? I thought we were supposed to just chit chat or talk about the show.

small talk is for chit chatting about anything other than the show...it is frowned upon to chit chat about stuff not show related on the other threads.

hmm, did i explain that correctly?

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19 minutes ago, valleycliffe said:

small talk is for chit chatting about anything other than the show...it is frowned upon to chit chat about stuff not show related on the other threads.

hmm, did i explain that correctly?

Essentially. We are free to share things of interest to us with other Preverts. 

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This evening the cousin and I will be watching "Happy Death Day 2U" and enjoying some grilled cheese sandwiches and Timbits from Tim Hortons. It's sad how excited I am about this development, heh. 

Also, I had one day of feeling 100% better after being hit with the flu and woke up to a coughing fit and feeling like I'm getting another cold/flu. Why does the Universe hate me so?

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22 hours ago, jewel21 said:

This evening the cousin and I will be watching "Happy Death Day 2U" and enjoying some grilled cheese sandwiches and Timbits from Tim Hortons. It's sad how excited I am about this development, heh. 

Also, I had one day of feeling 100% better after being hit with the flu and woke up to a coughing fit and feeling like I'm getting another cold/flu. Why does the Universe hate me so?

It doesn't, Jewel. It takes rest and time to get over the flu. 

Say hi to Steve!

Huey Newton Interview 1968

Reuters Photos of the week -- Fri Feb 15, 2019

?m=02&d=20190215&t=2&i=1357024543&w=780&

The Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) is seen over the sky near Inari in Lapland, Finland, February 14. REUTERS/Alexander Kuznetsov

What do free, open, and peaceful borders look like? Borderline - Frontiers of Peace by Valerio Vincenzo

peace-borders-01.jpg

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I saw the Northern Lights only once. I was driving back at night westbound along the 401 [for you TO people], coming back from Montreal. There was this sky-covering white sort of blaze across the whole night sky. Scared the crap out of me.

So much for nature's miracles.

Edited by pearlite
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when we lived in taylor bc (north peace area), during the winter the skies danced with northern lights.

- husband worked for bcr so we lived where he could work.

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Lake Minnewanka in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada -- 2003 -- Matt Payne

The hair on you arms tingle and you can smell the electrical charge in the air. Mesmerizing.

Edited by Cupid Stunt
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Thanks, it's not the best picture. I was too lazy to get out of bed so I just zoomed in on him, and I couldn't resize the photo on my phone so I just cropped it until it was small enough to upload here. He's much cuter in person, hee. 

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Mary McLeod Bethune (1875 - 1955) --  "What Does American Democracy Mean to Me?" -- America's Town Meeting of the Air, New York City - November 23, 1939

"Democracy is for me, and for 12 million black Americans, a goal towards which our nation is marching. It is a dream and an ideal in whose ultimate realization we have a deep and abiding faith."

The tiny library bringing books to remote villages

AP_19038832120950.jpg

San Gabriel Mountains and Angeles National Forest covered in snow. (AP)

Rare LA mega-storm could overwhelm dam and flood dozens of cities

23 hours ago, jewel21 said:

Seeing the Northern Lights is on my bucket list. 

You won't be disappointed.

23 hours ago, jewel21 said:

Steve says hi back.

Hello handsome!

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I'm mentioning this here since it relates to promos that are run in between shows on CBS. I was watching Y&R live today and during a break they had a short promo for two of their comedies the problem was it was an old one mentioning the cancelled before the start of this past fall season 'Kevin Can Wait' and the one that's still on with Matt LeBlanc  named 'Man With a Plan'. I've yet to watch either of them.

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