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AdorkableWitch

The All You Can Eat Buffet: My 600 Pound Life All Episode Discussion

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Like others have said upthread, most of them should probably be getting therapy to find out why they ate themselves up into the 600 lb range. Most of them probably have

either depression or are a victim of some type of trauma. It's probably safe to say that most of them are food addicts. One lady, I think Zsalynn, was shown going to

a therapist but I don't think anyone else has on the show.

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I honestly think they ALL know why they ate so much and what their triggers are. So far on the show pretty much everyone except Penny has said the why, just not the why they haven't dealt with the why.

 

ETA to fix an autocorrect mistake. Now should have been not.

Edited by KarmaG

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Does anyone else find it kind of amazing that the body can go up to 600+ pounds? I remember watching this one guy who weighed, I think, 1000 pounds. It's amazing to think of how much abuse the body can take before it just gives out. 

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Does anyone else find it kind of amazing that the body can go up to 600+ pounds?

 

Yes!  Especially when you realize the average heart is roughly the size of a fist, it is incredible that it can still pump blood and oxygen through-out a body that size.  If car manufacturers could only make a car engine that could work as efficiently as our cardiac system, we would all benefit!

 

Another point to ponder is this--several years ago (at least here in Texas), before surgeons would perform gastric bypass surgery, the patient was required to undergo a psychiatric evaluation--apparently that is no longer the case.  Otherwise people like Penny would never make the cut (no pun intended!).

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Does anyone else find it kind of amazing that the body can go up to 600+ pounds? I remember watching this one guy who weighed, I think, 1000 pounds. It's amazing to think of how much abuse the body can take before it just gives out.

I think of this when I see participants like Penny. Like, yes, you're Queen for Every Day,  but you could die at any moment. Which means no more giant bowls of cereal, no more time with your kids, no more anything. Your reign is over. Your life is over.

 

I also don't know how some of the participants carry a pregnancy to term when they are already so big. Wouldn't the doctor put them on some low-calorie regimen for the unborn baby's sake? And how is it that none of them think "hey, if I couldn't eat this stuff when I was pregnant, maybe I shouldn't eat it at all?"

 

Several years ago, lap band was the rage (I knew someone who had it). Does anyone know if that's an ineffective method of weight loss? I think Olivia had the lap band surgery via a sketchy doc before she considered gastric bypass.

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I'm surprised lymphedema seems to be the only circulation problems they have. Imagine that fist-sized heart circulating blood around a huge body that hardly moves. How is that possible?

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I wish there would be a show in which the doctor or a team of doctors could give a multi-faceted approach to the morbidly obese and simultaneously address nutrition, food addiction and psychological issues, and the medical procedure. I think Dr. Now is amazing and it's the right thing that he has a no-nonsense approach and puts the patients in their place but there is a big piece of the puzzle missing when he can't address patients like Zsalynn who say they are filling a hole in their heart with food. 

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I wish there would be a show in which the doctor or a team of doctors could give a multi-faceted approach to the morbidly obese and simultaneously address nutrition, food addiction and psychological issues, and the medical procedure. I think Dr. Now is amazing and it's the right thing that he has a no-nonsense approach and puts the patients in their place but there is a big piece of the puzzle missing when he can't address patients like Zsalynn who say they are filling a hole in their heart with food.

There was an A&E show called Heavy that took people with weight problems to a treatment center for a few months and had them exercise (a LOT), attend therapy, and meet with nutritionists. It was about teaching them healthy habits instead of making them fend for themselves.

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Watching some of the marathon today, it's so sad watching Henry's episode knowing things turned out for him.

 

I don't think I ever saw all of Donald's, because I don't recall it very well and he pisses me off just as much (if not more) than Penny.  A lot of her problems are the delusions that's she's created for herself, while Donald just didn't care.

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I saw most of Donald's episode yesterday. It appeared as if his mom (who was maddeningly enabling) was gaining weight as well.

I'm a therapist and I've done some evaluations on individuals who were looking to have the gastric surgery done. One in particular I really couldn't give the green light to. She was an alcoholic and just wanted to look good in her dating profile pictures. She even brought a bag of candy to the evaluation. The doctor did the surgery anyway.

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Watching some of the marathon today, it's so sad watching Henry's episode knowing things turned out for him.

 

 

I know.  I teared up when they showed him and his new bride Kirk dancing at their wedding.  He seemed like such a nice man.  R.I.P. Mr. Foots.  :-(

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But how does a person let themselves go like that? It's like a slow death.It's like watching a person just give up on life. I'm sure there were signs before they became 600lbs

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I saw most of Donald's episode yesterday. It appeared as if his mom (who was maddeningly enabling) was gaining weight as well.

I'm a therapist and I've done some evaluations on individuals who were looking to have the gastric surgery done. One in particular I really couldn't give the green light to. She was an alcoholic and just wanted to look good in her dating profile pictures. She even brought a bag of candy to the evaluation. The doctor did the surgery anyway.

I am not a therapist, but its clear to me that so many of the featured patients should not of been cleared for surgery. Donald is a perfect example. Besides the bad choices in food, all the mother, Donald and the rest of them talked about was "going to the club".    Gee, lets ignore that ALL of you are totally clueless about how to eat anything healthy and just focus on getting Donald back to the club. Then Donald starts drinking and taking drugs.

          Like DangerousMinds said, Its no different that any other addiction, so why cant they treat it and deal with it in a more direct and honest way? I have always thought the same thing for hoarders. Why is everyone enabling and tipy-toeing around? The hoarders and food addicts HAVE to learn to live a different way. Surgery is not a magic fix it.

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Just saw this pic on Mayra Rosales's ("half-ton killer) Facebook page and thought you all might like it: https://scontent-atl.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/v/t1.0-9/10868139_887919857939076_7287700687584471721_n.jpg?oh=5810c075c73db2d2e94d4922e3178374&oe=5550E415

 

I don't know if that link will work right, but it's a pic of Mayra, James, Olivia, and Mayra's husband (I think).  Everyone looks great!!!  

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Just saw this pic on Mayra Rosales's ("half-ton killer) Facebook page and thought you all might like it: https://scontent-atl.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/v/t1.0-9/10868139_887919857939076_7287700687584471721_n.jpg?oh=5810c075c73db2d2e94d4922e3178374&oe=5550E415

 

I don't know if that link will work right, but it's a pic of Mayra, James, Olivia, and Mayra's husband (I think).  Everyone looks great!!!  

 

Thanks for the pic. James and Olivia look great in the face. Olivia almost always has, she didn't carry it all in her face like many people. Glad they're mobile and happy at the very least.

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Yes!  Especially when you realize the average heart is roughly the size of a fist, it is incredible that it can still pump blood and oxygen through-out a body that size.  If car manufacturers could only make a car engine that could work as efficiently as our cardiac system, we would all benefit!

 

Another point to ponder is this--several years ago (at least here in Texas), before surgeons would perform gastric bypass surgery, the patient was required to undergo a psychiatric evaluation--apparently that is no longer the case.  Otherwise people like Penny would never make the cut (no pun intended!).

 

Regarding the psychiatric evaluation I was wondering the same thing myself.  In my state one's insurance dictates whether a psych eval is required or not.  I believe most (if not all) insurance carriers where I live require at least one 3-hour session which is comprised of a 45 minute multiple choice test/questionnaire followed by a 90 min. session with a psychiatrist.

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I think Penny can spout enough psychiatric catch phrases and self help group jargon that she could get past one visit with a psychologist.

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I haven't seen Donald's episode in a while, but I thought he just said, "dancing" before surgery and that could totally mean all sorts of things, like line dancing while drinking an iced tea. What's the problem with wanting to socialize and party? I don't think Donald et al should have to be pious and celibate, especially since part of their motivation for the surgery was to find partners and have a better quality of social life. Wasn't he doing okay-ish until the Guillain Barre knocked him out?

Nothing at all wrong with socializing and dancing, but there are also more important things like learning how to live a life that includes either education, a job or both.

 All we heard about was "the club".     He was doing ok, until he started drinking shots and doing drugs.

   He met a nice woman, but ran her off too because of his bad behavior.

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Without knowing the intimacies of Donald's health situation, I'd argue that the Guillain Barre did far more harm to him than drinking or doing drugs, even meth.

 

And chances are, that disease was completely unrelated to his weight and is actually quite a rare disease.   He would definitely benefit from therapy, even if it's just to deal with the crappy hand that life dealt him.   Just proves, sometimes in life are biggest problems are things we never even thought to worry about.  

 

Speaking of neurological disorders, I'm still mad that Dr. Now didn't state that Susan's neuropathy was directly related to a vitamin deficiency and instead implied that it was due to her weight.  Even Dr. Now is a member of the "fat is responsible for every single ailment" club.   Sometimes people get sick for no reason.

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Man, Pauline!  What a douchebag!  I think she's doing major damage to her son.  He seems very depressed.  And does she take baths?  She had on the same clothes during the whole show.  I'm getting a Penny vibe from Pauline.  A big whiny asshole!

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Pauline's son needs to get away from her. She doesn't care about him at all if she's not willing to do anything to help herself.

I googled her after the show and there were a couple of articles from 2012 talking about how she was using sex to lose weight.

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How kind of psch diagnosis would a psychologist provide?

 

Anxiety Disorder, Binge Eating Disorder, Depression... that's just off the top of my head as far as diagnosis for folks who have food issues. 

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Pauline's son needs to get away from her. She doesn't care about him at all if she's not willing to do anything to help herself.

I googled her after the show and there were a couple of articles from 2012 talking about how she was using sex to lose weight.

What is her last name?  I'm a glutton for punishment...

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Potter according to the name on her hospital room. 

Thanks - you are so observant!  So I googled it and found the youtube and I actually remember hearing about this lady before.  According to the youtube, she was the heaviest living woman at 643 pounds...so in the show, she was in the 670s...I wonder what happened to her ex-husband with whom she "reignited" things with.  I also laughed when I read that her target weight was 532.  Well, that's precisely why she's eating whatever she wants.  She's HAPPY!!!  yikes!  She should have never been approved for the surgery.  She's going to end up killing herself even quicker now.

 

Also, I think Charity Pierce is going to be on this show too who was also in the news a lot back in 2012 or so.  I think TLC has a feeder fetish.

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I googled her after the show and there were a couple of articles from 2012 talking about how she was using sex to lose weight.

 

 

I just vomited in my mouth.  :-(

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Anxiety Disorder, Binge Eating Disorder, Depression... that's just off the top of my head as far as diagnosis for folks who have food issues.

Thanks. Again I think that if caught early enough people who are heading towards 300 400 pounds can get help. I still can't feel bad for them. I do feel bad that they might have depression or a mental disorder.
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Thanks. Again I think that if caught early enough people who are heading towards 300 400 pounds can get help. I still can't feel bad for them. I do feel bad that they might have depression or a mental disorder.

 

Except the people on this show are getting help. Reaching out is hard, because of your statement right there "I still can't feel bad for them."  We see obesity in America as some sort of moral failing, that someone isn't strong enough to control their eating, instead of what it is, which is a progressive, dangerous disease with serious health risks. It's like a drug addiction. Many times, people don't realize they have a problem until they hit rock bottom. In August of last year, my doctor told me if I did not lose weight, I was going to die, and likely become dependent on pain medications to manage my illnesses. I also lost my best friend in the world because she told me I was "too chaotic" to be her friend. It took both of those things for me to finally admit that I have a problem. 

 

There are also barriers to getting help. Most insurance plans won't cover weight loss programs or nutritionists, and the coverage for mental health is limited sometimes to just prescription drugs. Your BMI has to be VERY high to get covered for gastric surgery, in the neighborhood of 45+ if you don't have any other complications such as diabetes. 

 

When someone gets to 300, 400 or 600 pounds, it's because they have serious issues that the medical system has failed to address. Rather than getting folks help when they are smaller, they are shamed by doctors who blame all of their health issues on their weight. Doctors who tell people to lose weight, but don't empower them with how. Go to Amazon, and type in weight loss. There are thousands of books, and most people are not educated enough in nutrition to figure out what a healthy diet plan should be. You get overwhelmed. 

 

If it were simple to conquer these food issues, no one would be 600 pounds. Research has shown that our ultraprocessed diets that so many Americans eat are addictive. There is a reaction in the brain that is almost identical to heroin to sugar and fat in some people. 

 

If you want to understand more, pick up a copy of the book Obsessed by Mika Brzezinski. It's a great book that talks about food disorders, and the science behind them. 

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Except the people on this show are getting help. Reaching out is hard, because of your statement right there "I still can't feel bad for them." We see obesity in America as some sort of moral failing, that someone isn't strong enough to control their eating, instead of what it is, which is a progressive, dangerous disease with serious health risks. It's like a drug addiction. Many times, people don't realize they have a problem until they hit rock bottom. In August of last year, my doctor told me if I did not lose weight, I was going to die, and likely become dependent on pain medications to manage my illnesses. I also lost my best friend in the world because she told me I was "too chaotic" to be her friend. It took both of those things for me to finally admit that I have a problem.

There are also barriers to getting help. Most insurance plans won't cover weight loss programs or nutritionists, and the coverage for mental health is limited sometimes to just prescription drugs. Your BMI has to be VERY high to get covered for gastric surgery, in the neighborhood of 45+ if you don't have any other complications such as diabetes.

When someone gets to 300, 400 or 600 pounds, it's because they have serious issues that the medical system has failed to address. Rather than getting folks help when they are smaller, they are shamed by doctors who blame all of their health issues on their weight. Doctors who tell people to lose weight, but don't empower them with how. Go to Amazon, and type in weight loss. There are thousands of books, and most people are not educated enough in nutrition to figure out what a healthy diet plan should be. You get overwhelmed.

If it were simple to conquer these food issues, no one would be 600 pounds. Research has shown that our ultraprocessed diets that so many Americans eat are addictive. There is a reaction in the brain that is almost identical to heroin to sugar and fat in some people.

If you want to understand more, pick up a copy of the book Obsessed by Mika Brzezinski. It's a great book that talks about food disorders, and the science behind them.

I know it's hard to diet and lose weight. But if the doctor keeps telling you lose weight or you're going to die or face serious health problems that should be a person's wake up call. For morbidity obese people who can't even do basic stuff like walk or get out of bed that should be their wake up call. And the family members and friends that keep enabling their behavior. Before it gets any worse they can try to help stop it in its track. Being 600lbs is like a slow suicide. It's very easy to go on the Internet and look up healthy recipes and diets. Even at home exercises. It's hard to actually have the willpower to change, that I understand. But seeing some obese people just eat themselves to death I can't feel bad. I feel bad that they have issues that cause them to get that big and feel that way but not for the way they eat and make bad choices.

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I wish they would set up a camera and film the person for one day to document how much and how often they eat.  I know they show scenes of them eating junk food, but just how much of it and how often are they eating it in a 24 hour period?  Then ask them to tell you what they ate that day and if they lie, show them the hidden camera footage of them eating every bite.  Of course, it probably won't have any effect on them if watching themselves on this show doesn't.  I swear, if I was that size, I would be mortified to have the whole world seeing my naked morbidly obese body on nationwide tv.

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I know it's hard to diet and lose weight. But if the doctor keeps telling you lose weight or you're going to die or face serious health problems that should be a person's wake up call. For morbidity obese people who can't even do basic stuff like walk or get out of bed that should be their wake up call. And the family members and friends that keep enabling their behavior. Before it gets any worse they can try to help stop it in its track. Being 600lbs is like a slow suicide. It's very easy to go on the Internet and look up healthy recipes and diets. Even at home exercises. It's hard to actually have the willpower to change, that I understand. But seeing some obese people just eat themselves to death I can't feel bad. I feel bad that they have issues that cause them to get that big and feel that way but not for the way they eat and make bad choices.

 

It's not just about dieting, and I think that is what you might be failing to understand. The thing is, I guarantee you every single one of these people have dieted before. Every single one of them has tried to lose the weight. I can speak to this because once upon a time, I was 400 pounds. The problem is that you get good and losing weight, but then you return to your old behavior, and you tend to gain it all back. In 2006, I lost over 150 pounds. It came back, plus more. 

 

I'm not 100% yet. I don't know that I ever will be. It's taken cognative behavioral therapy, 12 step work, and group therapy for me to get to the point that I can battle the constant gnawing inside, and the emotions that I suppressed with food for 30+ years. To this day, I have no idea what "full" feels like, and I never have. I have often considered weight loss surgery. I actually think right now I am a decent candidate, but my husband works in healthcare and has seen the complications and won't agree to it. 

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It's not just about dieting, and I think that is what you might be failing to understand. The thing is, I guarantee you every single one of these people have dieted before. Every single one of them has tried to lose the weight. I can speak to this because once upon a time, I was 400 pounds. The problem is that you get good and losing weight, but then you return to your old behavior, and you tend to gain it all back. In 2006, I lost over 150 pounds. It came back, plus more. 

 

I'm not 100% yet. I don't know that I ever will be. It's taken cognative behavioral therapy, 12 step work, and group therapy for me to get to the point that I can battle the constant gnawing inside, and the emotions that I suppressed with food for 30+ years. To this day, I have no idea what "full" feels like, and I never have. I have often considered weight loss surgery. I actually think right now I am a decent candidate, but my husband works in healthcare and has seen the complications and won't agree to it. 

I know I already acknowledged you , but I wanted to again because you do know what you are talking about.   

 I think its been clear that everyone profiled so far has some kind of trauma at some point and used food as a barrier, just like when someone barricades themselves as a hoarder or certain drug addicts use drugs to numb the pain they feel.

       If these people do not deal deeply with their emotional problems, nothing will ever help. Then, a complete lifestyle change, not a diet(s).  

        Easier said than done, but it can be done and I am with your husband on this, no surgery.   Anything invasive should always be a last resort.

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I know it's easier said than done. These people need help and I wish someone including the doctor or another outsider catches this kind of thing early rather than later. It takes willpower to change and you can force anyone to change but a slow death and suicide are very serious. Before anything happens just like on the show Hoarders they bring in a license therapist to address some of the issues that lead to hoarding. They need to do the same with an emotional Eater. I remember a 500 lb guy losing all that weight having skin removal surgery then gained it all back. He worked with Chris Powell. So yes you can lose weight but if the emotional aspects aren't address then losing all that weight isn't going to help anything.

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is there something like the opposite of body dysmorphic disorder?

 

While technically BDD is a distorted view of oneself, this would fall under that diagnosis.  However, most psychiatrists I've known have used the more innocuous diagnosis of Adjustment Disorder when evaluating a patient for potential weight loss surgery.  

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I also don't know how some of the participants carry a pregnancy to term when they are already so big.

 

 

I also wonder at HOW they were able to conceive in the 1st place. Yes, I know the mechanics of it, but not how all those miles of lard are navigated.

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My story = the flip side.  For many years I've had a stomach ulcer located at the point where the stomach empties into the intestine.  But is definitely in the stomach.  When inflamed, it swells and shuts off that opening so the anything that you swallow must come back through the mouth.  It is extremely painful.  I mean extreme and goes from stomach to back like a hot knife.  I don't have the bacteria, so the antibiotics wouldn't work.  So for years I'd eat what I wanted and gain weight but knew that in a year to two, that weight would come off.  Until a few years ago, when the attacks are so frequent that I am now permanently underweight.  In fact, I've rid myself of all the regular and beyond weight clothes.  Then last year I ended up in hospital for month because I couldn't stand it anymore and found that beyond ulcer, I also had a kink in the small intestine.  Treatment, NPO and IVs because I was almost dead.  They waited 3 weeks for the kink to clear on its own, it did not, so cut out some of the small intestine.  Then a couple of weeks more in hospital.  The reason they didn't want to do surgery sooner was that scar tissue forms and they are likely to have to repeat surgery because of scar tissue.  Now, that's the way to lose weight.  Have to be extra careful now to keep stuff moving.  It's difficult because I don't eat enough.  The thought of eating sickens me.  If you get sick you tend to avoid food.  After a couple of days, you are not hungry anymore.  Let that stomach shrink down and you aren't hungry, and no you don't "have to eat".  I take a vitamin.  But if I feel like eating and I find chocolate meringue pie, I buy 2 at a time.  Am I healthy?  Blood work and BP suggest I'm fine.  However I don't often have a good day.

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It's difficult because I don't eat enough.  The thought of eating sickens me.  If you get sick you tend to avoid food.  After a couple of days, you are not hungry anymore.  Let that stomach shrink down and you aren't hungry, and no you don't "have to eat".  I take a vitamin.  But if I feel like eating and I find chocolate meringue pie, I buy 2 at a time.  Am I healthy?  Blood work and BP suggest I'm fine.  However I don't often have a good day.

Your condition sounds very painful and challenging.  I hope you can find a healthy balance that works for your system.

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I also wonder at HOW they were able to conceive in the 1st place. Yes, I know the mechanics of it, but not how all those miles of lard are navigated.

Shouldn't have read this, now I have an image I can't get rid of. Why would anyone get pregnant knowing their heath is in danger?

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Shouldn't have read this, now I have an image I can't get rid of. Why would anyone get pregnant knowing their heath is in danger?

Extreme obesity may interfere with the mentstrual cycle, thus no periods may not be a sign of pregnancy. So when a woman actually is, she may not know it. I think any pregnancy in this condition is a " whoops! "

Edited by youcantbeserious

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Re: Donald's regression, I was appalled and mystified when he was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre. Never having heard of it before, seeing him laid up in a coma for several months terrified me that he may not make it or be in a permanent vegetative state. When his mom reintroduced him to solid food and crowed about how many tacos he could eat, I think it was the first time I was palpably ANGRY at someone on this show. Possibly because he'd been doing so well up until that point.

 

Earlier this year, my own stepmother was diagnosed with GB and I learned firsthand how devastating it is. It is a very rare disease, with an 80% full recovery rate and only 5% chance of death. The caveat is that it takes up to a year to make a full recovery if you do. My stepmother (who is very thin but very healthy) has made a nearly full recovery in about eight weeks and is back to work, although she can't drive yet and her eyes still bother her. The scary part is that she works in the healthcare field but can never get a flu shot or the flu itself, or it may kill her. I'm hoping she moves into more of an administrative role rather than a patient-tending role. So thinking back to Donald now really hits me hard.

 

In tonight's episode, I started to feel really awful for (can't remember his name) when he leaned on the towel rack and broke it. I had to remind myself that my 120-pound frame has broken more than one of those cheap Target towel hangers, so while it looks dramatic, it's not as bad as it seems.

 

It really is amazing what the human body can withstand. Sometimes I worry about my blood pressure or cholesterol levels, even though all are fine--in fact, I'm running a marathon on Sunday--simply because I'm aging. The fact that these people are still alive is just mind-boggling to me.

 

Has anyone noticed how these patients eat when they're on camera? They eat daintily, as if they're trying to portray that they're not really tasting or enjoying their food. Their lips curl back from the food, and they stick their tongues out delicately when they put a fork in their mouths. I'm probably reading too much into it, but it seems to portray a helplessness like, "listen, I'm not enjoying this--I actually don't love food that much, this is disgusting, there's just something wrong with my body, see?" 

Edited by monagatuna
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It really is amazing what the human body can withstand. Sometimes I worry about my blood pressure or cholesterol levels, even though all are fine--in fact, I'm running a marathon on Sunday--simply because I'm aging. The fact that these people are still alive is just mind-boggling to me.

 

Has anyone noticed how these patients eat when they're on camera? They eat daintily, as if they're trying to portray that they're not really tasting or enjoying their food. Their lips curl back from the food, and they stick their tongues out delicately when they put a fork in their mouths. I'm probably reading too much into it, but it seems to portray a helplessness like, "listen, I'm not enjoying this--I actually don't love food that much, this is disgusting, there's just something wrong with my body, see?" 

 

First of all, great post!  You are right on target on everything you said.  I can shed some light on your two last paragraphs.  While I have never weighed 600 lbs, I have still battled with morbid obesity for my entire life until I decided to have the surgery.  I was one of the healthy ones where I had normal blood pressure and stable blood sugar, the only thing that qualified me for surgery is that my BMI was 49.  I have a skinny friend who runs marathons, doesn't eat beef and is pre-diabetic.  Health is probably 90% genetics.  The excess weight eventually does catch up with you, at the very least, it will kill your joints.  Joe (the guy from last night) was 31 with no real health issues, by 41 he would have been bedridden if he didn't take action.

 

Now about the love of food...and this is completely anecdotal, but as a morbidly obese person, I actually hate food and the practice of eating.  Eating is gross.  The list of foods I won't eat is a mile long.  Also, for a period of time I tried "mindful eating" which is where I sat down with my meal with no distractions (no TV, computer, phone, etc) and just ate.  It was the most unpleasant experience ever.  Instead, I prefered to shovel large amounts of food in my mouth, especially if no one was looking, because it had a numbing effect. The surgery, for me anyway, has taken away the ability for me to shovel food in my mouth (it completely takes the pleasure out of eating), and thus I have lost a lot of weight.  Eating hurts now.  For some of us, it really is a brain problem.  Unfortunately science hasn't figured out how to stop the brain from forcing you to eat yourself to death, so they suggest the next best thing, restrict the amount you can eat at one time.  All the desire is still there.

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Re: Donald's regression, I was appalled and mystified when he was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre. Never having heard of it before, seeing him laid up in a coma for several months terrified me that he may not make it or be in a permanent vegetative state. When his mom reintroduced him to solid food and crowed about how many tacos he could eat, I think it was the first time I was palpably ANGRY at someone on this show. Possibly because he'd been doing so well up until that point.

 

Earlier this year, my own stepmother was diagnosed with GB and I learned firsthand how devastating it is. It is a very rare disease, with an 80% full recovery rate and only 5% chance of death. The caveat is that it takes up to a year to make a full recovery if you do. My stepmother (who is very thin but very healthy) has made a nearly full recovery in about eight weeks and is back to work, although she can't drive yet and her eyes still bother her. The scary part is that she works in the healthcare field but can never get a flu shot or the flu itself, or it may kill her. I'm hoping she moves into more of an administrative role rather than a patient-tending role. So thinking back to Donald now really hits me hard.

 

In tonight's episode, I started to feel really awful for (can't remember his name) when he leaned on the towel rack and broke it. I had to remind myself that my 120-pound frame has broken more than one of those cheap Target towel hangers, so while it looks dramatic, it's not as bad as it seems.

 

It really is amazing what the human body can withstand. Sometimes I worry about my blood pressure or cholesterol levels, even though all are fine--in fact, I'm running a marathon on Sunday--simply because I'm aging. The fact that these people are still alive is just mind-boggling to me.

 

Has anyone noticed how these patients eat when they're on camera? They eat daintily, as if they're trying to portray that they're not really tasting or enjoying their food. Their lips curl back from the food, and they stick their tongues out delicately when they put a fork in their mouths. I'm probably reading too much into it, but it seems to portray a helplessness like, "listen, I'm not enjoying this--I actually don't love food that much, this is disgusting, there's just something wrong with my body, see?" 

OMG!    I am so glad you posted your thoughts because I thought it was just me. The "dainty" eating.   Your description and reasons are perfect, except one thing. You forgot the pinky finger.   Especially Penny and Pauline with the damn pinky.        I always cringe when I see it.

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