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owenthurman

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  1. owenthurman

    S04.E01: A Flock of Lost Birds

    I missed that! Reference to Star Trek and Game of Thrones?
  2. owenthurman

    The Passage

    That, to me, was the most problematic change. The book's
  3. owenthurman

    The Passage

    I haven't watched the episode yet, but based on the book, there could be some good reasons to be bothered by the race change. In the book at least, Again, I haven't watched the ep yet, so maybe they found a good way to deal with the issues around that.
  4. owenthurman

    S11.E08: The Witchfinders

    I agree with y'all regarding the series, but that was actually addressed in the dialogue of this episode. King James looks the crew over -- I may be transcribing this a little wrong because his accent was unclear to me -- and says "Peculiar rags there, silks. And such strange garments. Are you actors?" Though a throwaway line lampshading the issue isn't enough to make the issue go away.
  5. owenthurman

    S01.E06 Kappa Spirit

    I suspect these storytellers don't understand why anyone wants to belong to a sorority or a fraternity; they know these things only from the perspective of a distant outsider. But I know a woman -- a bestselling novelist -- who owes some of her success to her sorority sisters: when she was trying to find a literary agent, she wrote to one who was a member of the same sorority; the literary agent had contacts with sorority sisters in the publishing world; when the book was published, it was given publicity by sorority sisters, and other sorority sisters helped usher it to Hollywood.... This might sound like a conspiracy, but they are all so proud of her. I attended a dinner they held in her honor, and they were so tickled to be supportive of a sorority sister, they may as well have been kvelling. Many of the women in that room had never met before, but they all seemed to feel such a deep mutual affection. They seemed proud that they were part of a traditon with familial bonds stretching back over a century, and this one novelist's successes were something they all took pride in. It was nothing like the representations I'd seen in movies. Granted, the movies show college girls and the women in that room ranged from 20 to 85, but the cinematic representations all seem to be storytold by people who don't even understand that a sorority can give a powerful sense of community, and I suspect the Charmed writers learned about sorority life from those movies. This leads viewers to ask "why the hell does Maggie want to join this dumb sorority anyway?" rather than feel torn by the dilemma; and since we don't feel the tension between Maggie's choices, we don't find ourselves identifying with her but judging her.
  6. owenthurman

    S04.E05: Tagumo Attacks!!!

    The three-breasted woman has become a metatrope; it's not just referring to three-breasted women but also to every prior appearance of the image. Check "Multiboobage" on tvtropes for many more examples.
  7. owenthurman

    S04.E05: Tagumo Attacks!!!

    A Thanksgiving episode, AND a tribute to the kaiju films of the great Ishirō Honda? This show is so much fun.
  8. owenthurman

    S04.E06: Call to Action

  9. owenthurman

    S08.E10: Apocalypse Then

    Very little confusion here, but only because I've rewatched Coven recently. Reading this thread, there's so much confusion, and I consider that a failing of the show rather than the viewers: it shouldn't be mandatory for all viewers to remember all the details of a previous season in order to enjoy the current season. For instance: Nan. At the end of Coven, she went off with Papa Legba, as a kind of assistant, and seemed quite happy about it: an eternity of naughty fun. But Cordelia didn't know this; she never learned what happened to Nan; Nan disappeared and Cordelia never saw her again until last night's episode, when the door swung open and Nan walked in out of the mists. To viewers who don't remember Coven clearly, it would look as though Mallory resurrected her. Madison. At the end of Coven, she went to hell, and she deserved it; she'd earned it. But in the alternate future of Apocalypse, she was willing to put her (new) life on the line to fight the Antichrist, so she deserved a shot at redemption; she'd earned it. Mallory's decision to resurrect Misty Day ASAP but leave Madison in hell a while longer makes perfect sense, but only if one recalls that Madison had actually earned her time in hell. ----- Legba and other afterlife figures know Mallory killed the Antichrist? Interesting. Does this mean Legba will honor his alternate-future arrangement with Cordelia, exchanging Marie Laveau's soul for Dinah's? Meaning Marie Laveau would still be around in the reset-future? If this were another show, if a character delivered a line as badass as Cordelia's "Satan has one son but my sisters are legion, motherfucker," people would be talking about it everywhere. But it got lost in all the confusion. I think the show has actually set up enough material here for a good spinoff, or media tie-in novels. The Coven, the resentful warlocks, Marie Laveau and Dinah, the continued existence of Hotel Cortez and the Murder House.... I'd watch or read that.
  10. owenthurman

    S08.E10: Apocalypse Then

    I enjoyed it a lot, which came as a surprise. But I won't watch the season again unless someone releases an edited version, cutting down both the initial buildup at the compound and the tedious flashbacks. While the warlocks were entertaining, were they really needed for the story? People have raised some issues on this thread. Regarding Madison, 1: I think it was clearly a case of Madison sacrificing herself not a "turning her back when the enemy seems to be down." She hears him revive, realizes what it means, and instead of trying to save herself, she says "Oh fuck, I guess it's back to retail [hell]," then readies the gun. Though this was never addressed this season, in Coven Madison had chosen to become a villain before she died; so she has come a long way, offering her life to keep fighting the Antichrist. Madison, 2: at the end, Mallory says, "I know where Madison is; I'll have to go to hell and bring her back. But she can sweat it out a little longer." So it's implied that Madison will be raised from the dead and rejoin the coven, with Queenie and Misty (and sadly no Myrtle). The genetically special couple from the beginning of the season: reading this thread, I think some people didn't realize that they were the same couple who met at the end of the episode and led to the next Antichrist's birth.
  11. owenthurman

    S08.E08: Soujourn

    Here' s the twist ending I'm rooting for: Michael discovers his humanity and decides he doesn't want to harm anyone... but it turns out Satan has a backup plan. Antichrist Plan B is Mallory.
  12. owenthurman

    S08.E08: Soujourn

    At any grocery store, you can go to the shelves of Crystal Light, and nearby you'll find packets of sugar-free grape drink powder from Welch's and other brands. There are packets that make a half-gallon and packets that make 16 ounces. I mix one of the smaller packets of the grape mix with one teaspoon of water, stir until it's got a syrupy consistency, and slowly pour in cold club soda. It works out great, and I do this with other flavors too. Sorry for the off-topic-ness, everybod.
  13. owenthurman

    S11.E03: Rosa

    This is a non-sequitur. I'm not making the argument right now whether south or north is more racist. "the [official Texas] guidelines for the [public school history] books downplay some issues — like slavery — and skirt others — like Jim Crow laws." Southern schools are lying to children about our history. The state of Texas mandated rules to teach that "States' rights were the real issues behind the Civil War. Slavery was an after issue." It's a flat-out lie. https://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2015/07/13/421744763/how-textbooks-can-teach-different-versions-of-history Most Secessionists supported the Dred Scott decision -- which took away the rights of northern states to outlaw slavery within their own borders. Quite literally, the leaders of the southern states opposed states' rights when the federal government forced states to allow slavery. The Secessionists only started to support states' rights when the federal government started talking about freeing slaves. The Civil War was about slavery. Yet in Texas, history books aren't allowed to tell the truth. That article is only about Texas, but the anti-truth movement is an ideology throughout the education systems in a number of southern states. And no, the other side doesn't do it too. Only if those history classes are north of the Mason-Dixon.
  14. owenthurman

    S11.E03: Rosa

    I suspect it's only taught in history classes north of the Mason-Dixon.
  15. owenthurman

    S11.E03: Rosa

    Did you mean 21st? Not sure I'm interpreting you right. The rest of your post is spot-on.
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