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Rinaldo

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  1. Rinaldo

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    I recorded Some Came Running when it was on last week, because I remember it being a big deal when I was young, though it's not much talked about now. But I haven't gotten around to watching it yet, and I wonder if anyone here has opinions for or against it.
  2. Rinaldo

    The Other Two

    I would also tentatively suggest (without trying to change anyone's mind) that Call Me By Your Name has not (yet?) achieved the central cultural position that something like The Graduate (or Ferris Bueller, to give another example) has and retains. There are still a fair number of people who haven't seen it; but I do recognize that for those who have seen something, the fun of a reference is spoiled if it's named aloud. This time I fell on the other side of the divide, but I've been the other person in my time.
  3. Rinaldo

    The Other Two

    But for those of us who haven't seen the movie, like me, it was helpful.
  4. Rinaldo

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    There's a little more to it than that, I think -- probably a combination of a lot of little things. I remember when it came out (right when I was graduating from college, and with the ending of my student deferment, facing the possibility of the draft and maybe Vietnam). I was impressed by a number of striking features: a grittier and (if you want to put it that way) more "real" picture of New York than we were used to seeing in Hollywood product; a frank depiction of junkies and people in the sex trade (including some indications of that trade in action, just offscreen -- new and provocative then); Dustin Hoffman, previously known only from The Graduate, revealing himself as a character actor who suddenly seemed capable of anything; a brand-new face as the other lead, Jon Voight, equally promising; and some colorful figures in support; and, yes, Harry Nilsson! I think that all that new and exciting stuff adds up to more than "perceived social relevance" (I generally didn't worry about such things), though maybe "breaking of boundaries" comes a little closer. Probably though, it's the sort of thing that tends not to be visible a half century later, when the trajectory of those acting careers has run its course, and the grit and sex is nothing new. I guess I'm not disagreeing, as much as filling out the picture a bit from my own memories.
  5. Rinaldo

    The Other Two

    Speaking of the after show... I'm delighted they had Josh Segarra on this time, because he's just the coolest. It's no surprise that he landed the main-guy role in the Electric Company reboot a decade ago, practically straight out of college. Off and on Broadway, he's done primarily musicals. On TV, while he had recurring parts on Chicago PD and Arrow, he especially excels at playing a lovable doofus, as on the two-season sitcom Sirens (seriously, if you've never seen it, give it a look) and here on The Other Two. They rightly mentioned on this segment how he can take what might be a one-dimensional character like that and fill it with warmth as well as humor.
  6. Well, let's see... First of all, I doubt that anybody drove all the way back from the city. Those who live in New Rochelle commute by train. The car is for errands closer to home, or to leave at the station. Buddy and Sally live in the city, don't they?, so they wouldn't keep a car at all. My thought is that this isn't a work day, and Rob has come back from somewhere (looking for a sufficiently skinny suit?) late on a Saturday afternoon, and Laura invited the other two up for an impromptu dinner party. We see her telling Rob "We have guests," as she gestures toward them. Actually, I'm just being silly and having fun. Your point is well taken. And then there's the first-season credit sequence, with just photographs of everyone scattered around, to a rhumba-like bongo-filled arrangement of the theme song.
  7. Rinaldo

    S06.E09: The Golden Child

    Way before the 80s even -- remember the local rich lady on the Dick Van Dyke Show (played by Maleficent herself, Eleanor Audley) announcing to the TV writers, "I'm afraid I deaun't eaun a television machine."
  8. Rinaldo

    The Other Two

    Well, maybe. That makes more sense than anything else I've come up with. Which is still not much sense, though. A hole-in-the-wall acting class somewhere in NYC is a radically different environment from a TV network corporate showcase.
  9. Rinaldo

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    I'm with you on Charade and Two for the Road (and you can throw in Bedazzled), but as to the last two you cite... in this sort of retrospective, the director (or whoever) deserves to be represented by his best work. And Movie Movie, though I love it (I bought the Blu-Ray, and I don't own that many), is uneven (in ways that aren't all his fault, but still there it is). And Staircase is just a horrible mistake in every way; if @Milburn Stone saw it, it might well establish a new standard for the worst movie he's ever seen. How about splitting the difference? Keep two musicals (give the hook to Seven Brides and On the Town for their various sins) and add two nonmusicals, Charade and Two for the Road.
  10. Rinaldo

    Russian Doll

    That "Things You May Have Missed" video had some good bits (I'd read that the three EMTs/coders/deli guys were the same but it was cool to see it shown, even if it seems more like a cute casting choice than anything that could be significant within the story). But others like the disappearing fish and ring are spotlit as crucial developments -- who could miss them if they were halfway paying attention? I also wonder why some reviews, and this official Netflix video, calls the place a bodega when all the characters within the show refer to it as a deli. (Not that one term is inherently better than the other, but why go against the script?)
  11. Rinaldo

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    I've now finished watching the movie (thanks for the tip!) and the Hitchcock derivation is certainly unmistakable. Even more specifically, it reuses elements of The Lady Vanishes: English people in peril aboard a train taking them though dangerous territory; undercover agents aboard; same screenwriters; same Margaret Lockwood; and the same pair of eccentric ultra-English gents aboard the train -- not just the same actors, the same character names!* An online bio of Reed even says that at the time, it was advertised as a sequel to The Lady Vanishes -- erroneously, but tellingly. I'd call it a minor piece of work by comparison (either there's some muddled storytelling in the first half, or my attention wavered), but once we get everyone on that train, and then into a car chase and finally to a sky tram to Switzerland, the suspense does take hold. (*I looked up that pair in Wikipedia, and am glad I did, it's such an odd circumstance. Basil Radford and Naunton Wayne played Caldicott and Charters first in The Lady Vanishes, and repeated the roles 2 years later in Night Train to Munich, in which they're not just just comic cameos but highly important elements of the story, joining the principals in their escape. In Crook's Tour, they're the leading characters, in a "mistaken for spies so must become spiels for real" sort of plot (it's included as an extra on the Lady Vanishes DVD). And they're back to support in Millions Like Us. Having refused roles in another picture as too small for the stars they'd become, they were legally prevented from using the character names any more, but the two actors appeared together as similar characters in eight other films (of which I've seen Dead of Night and Passport to Pimlico) and on the radio. The characters were even given a mid-80s TV series, played by other actors.)
  12. Rinaldo

    The Other Two

    The Insta-gay portion of this episode was fun (I recommend the after-show for this episode, which had two of those actors on, and discussed what they were getting at). But I couldn't figure out the acting class bit, with Cary pretending to have sex with his fellow waiter, while the teacher critiqued them for not showing enough "shame" as an essential part of being gay. I can see it if this were set in the 1950s when that was the standard attitude (though no kind of sex would have been depicted so explicitly). But now, with any such class containing some out gay men (as both these guys are) and it being customary in such circles to announce solidarity with LGBTQ causes (even if it's only token, as in the audition situations Cary goes through)... what was this about? I know the creators have talked about how it's possible/common, even after being out to one's family and friends, to still not be at ease with oneself; and I don't disagree. But I can't see how it applies in this scenario. It's the first time I really haven't understood what the series was getting at.
  13. Rinaldo

    S06.E09: The Golden Child

    The difference being that it wasn't Gina. We know that Boyle is a good cop, so the resolution wasn't a falsification.
  14. Rinaldo

    S06.E09: The Golden Child

    I just rewatched it -- seriously, it's so good! -- and a couple more things stood out to me this time. @thuganomics85 beat me to it, Holt's idea of how straight men talk remains, as ever, preposterously wonderful. (Or wonderfully preposterous.) It wouldn't be so funny if he weren't otherwise such an erudite, well-informed, intelligent person. And throughout Boyle's plot, all the actor/director jargon. (Normally I'm a fervent believer in giving writers credit for the scripts, but surely the actors proposed a few gems from their own experiences?) "Wear clothing you can move in." "This is a safe space." "You know your scripts? Now throw them away!" "You've given me a good range of choices here." "This is one of the hardest choices I've ever had to make." Just one after another. And Amy DID get her hair blown out before bailing David out, didn't she? She was so fabulously petty throughout those minutes of triumph.
  15. Rinaldo

    S06.E09: The Golden Child

    It's a fun moment to imagine, but I'm glad that the show generally avoids cheap meta-winks of that sort. This I think will stand as one of their all-round classic episodes. Both plots were meaty, surprising, and funny. The dance-off, which was so featured in all the promos, turned out to be an oddly unrelated intrusion... until, of course, it ended with Amy stylishly giving herself a concussion.
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