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Milburn Stone

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  1. Milburn Stone

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    I think it's good. So many good performances, from Sinatra, MacLaine, Martin, Hyer, and Kennedy (among others). A consistent mood and tone of doom set by Minnelli. (It's like a film noir, if films noir came in Metrocolor and CinemaScope.) Good score by Elmer Bernstein. The only thing that has bothered me over the years is that it seems like the story is meant to take place right after the war, and yet nothing about the milieu, from the moment Sinatra gets off the bus in the first scene, feels remotely like anything but 1958. It was many years before I even realized it wasn't supposed to be 1958.
  2. Milburn Stone

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    Hope you feel better soon, @NowVoyager. I share your admiration for Anita Ekberg. For me, her finest three minutes on film is the main title sequence of Frank Tashlin's Hollywood or Bust. https://youtu.be/6Vl8KH1-DYY?t=83
  3. Milburn Stone

    The Case Against Adnan Syed

    You're making me realize I wish this show had more than 4 episodes. I don't care if it only takes 4 episodes to tell the story! 🙂
  4. Milburn Stone

    The Case Against Adnan Syed

    A very tangential thought...In this time when it's increasingly rare to have to wait a week to watch anything, I'm really enjoying that I have to wait a week between episodes of this. It builds a feeling of anticipation.
  5. Milburn Stone

    The Case Against Adnan Syed

    Unfortunately, a safe bet is that the cops figured "those people" would do exactly that.
  6. Milburn Stone

    Commercials That Annoy, Irritate or Outright Enrage

    I hear you--boy, do I hear you--but in my experience (which is all I have to go on), concern for the impact my [fill in medical condition here] has on others is a big part of the equation, whether commercials are mentioning it or not. So commercials that do depict this impact are actually displaying insight into the feelings of the target consumer. And that motivates change.
  7. Milburn Stone

    The Case Against Adnan Syed

    The second episode was more compelling than the first. I thought I wasn't going to watch this show because I was a fan of Serial and I thought, well, what more is this show going to tell me? But it really is adding a lot of dimension to the story. Seeing trial footage, hearing police tapes, following the private investigators, just simply being able to lay eyes on the cast of characters--that's all making it worth the watch for me.
  8. Milburn Stone

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    Your memories jibe with mine. In particular, Hoffman's performance was a revelation and absolutely iconic. After that movie, you couldn't be crossing a street with a car coming perilously close without at least thinking to yourself, in your own version of a working class New York accent, "I'm walkin' here!" Time is a big factor, as you say; I see an analog in music. To pick one example out of thousands, you have to know your music history really well in order to vicariously experience Beethoven's symphonies as shocking. You don't need that background to appreciate them as great, but you do need it to appreciate them as revolutionary. For that, you have to know that nobody wrote music like that before.
  9. Milburn Stone

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    Loved The Heiress. (Turns out all the good Copland music is in the suite that's been recorded by Leonard Slatkin. There was a lot of other music in the film that was either Copland interpolating mid-nineteenth-century popular music or doing his own pastiche of it, but not particularly interesting in either case. I love his new work in it, though.) Such great writing, direction, and acting from everyone in the cast. I think it disappears from On Demand at the end of tomorrow (at least on xfinity) so if you want to catch it, make a point of it.
  10. Milburn Stone

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    Wanna know a Donen-involved movie that you don't want to see? Living in a Big Way (1947), starring Gene Kelly, with choreography (and no doubt direction of musical numbers) by Kelly and Donen. The numbers aren't the problem. It's never shown, because it never should be shown. An essay could be written on why. But--I know this sounds like hyperbole--it may be the worst movie I've ever seen. Not just the worst movie involving major talents I've ever seen; the worst movie I've ever seen.
  11. Milburn Stone

    This Is CNN

    I like Chris's radio show on SiriusXM POTUS, on which he often notes how Maddow and Hannity destroy him in the prime time TV ratings. So the other night for a change of pace we switched from Rachel to sample his CNN show. It was the same yelling and screaming over each other that made me remember why I stopped watching in the first place. From the radio, I know he's smart enough to run an interesting show without all that tumult, and I wish he would.
  12. Milburn Stone

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    From an Associated Press article today: So, on the one hand, good news (I suppose) that TCM isn't even mentioned! Maybe AT&T doesn't know it exists. On the other hand, I wonder what's in store for TCM with the departure of Turner's president.
  13. This is a question/suggestion, not a bug. (Apologies if it's been asked and answered in the past; I don't see it among the existing topics.) I just had the experience of boneheadedly clicking the wrong icon--and then boneheadedly clicking Save before I realized my mistake--which resulted in my quoting my own post when I was actually trying to edit it. It would have been great if I could eliminate the mistaken post altogether, but I don't see where that is possible. The only solution seems to be to edit the mistaken post by replacing the content with "Nothing to see here" or something like that. Could the option to delete mistaken posts be built into the Forums at some point in the future? (Or is there already a way to do it that I'm not seeing?) Thanks.
  14. Milburn Stone

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    Even though I've never seen this film, I adore Aaron Copland's music for it. (Or at least a suite from it that appears on an RCA Red Seal disc conducted by Leonard Slatkin called Copland: Music for Films. It's out of print but available used from Amazon and other places. There's also a more complete recording of the score, taken from the actual soundtrack, on Intrada, which I don't have.) A fancier of practically all things Copland, I might put the suite from The Heiress at #1. So thank you for letting us know the movie is On Demand. I'll find it there or on Watch TCM forthwith.
  15. Milburn Stone

    TCM: The Greatest Movie Channel

    I'll be interested to hear what you think of it. (And if you pick up whiffs of Hitchcock as I did.)
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