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S02.E14: All In 2013.12.09

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A man is killed over a bad investment, but Major Crimes finds several possible suspects. Meanwhile DDA Rios comes to blows again with Sharon and Rusty.

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Graham Patrick Martin's talking into the couch scene was LOL funny and makes me wish they would write for his character more like they used to write Provenza and Flynn. Especially in the current (5th?) season, enough time has passed since his initial trauma that it would seem realistic for Rusty to have more moments of levity in his life.

 

I remember when these episodes first aired that there was a lot of hate for Rios, including the inappropriateness of her cleavage baring dress both for her job and especially when working with Rusty. I still wonder why they had her dress that way.

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On 8/5/2017 at 8:40 PM, shapeshifter said:

Graham Patrick Martin's talking into the couch scene was LOL funny

I love that, too.  Perfect teen response (and he's short, so he fits perfectly onto the couch onto which he flops, which somehow adds to the scene).  I also like him answering her question about what he might want to be when he grows up with, “A witness, obviously, because this trial is going to last the rest of my life.”

I really like this episode for Andy’s storyline.  It’s interesting to see him growing up after all these years, and I like how slowly it has played out.  Duff described him, in a special feature on this season’s DVDs, as being so long out of touch with his feelings that he’s a little bewildered and doesn’t really understand what he’s feeling now.  He wants some changes in his life, but it’s a little vague to him.  And I can see that.  I think going to his daughter’s wedding, only a few years into being back in his kids’ lives in any appreciable way and almost certainly for the first time being surrounded by the extended family (of people who “hate him”), woke him up to what he was missing, and that it didn’t have to continue to be that way, or to continue to progress so glacially.  That it was huge to get sober and dedicate himself to staying that way, but it wasn’t enough.  He has to dig in more than that to make things up to his family and change things going forward.

That Andy Flynn is sitting down at family therapy is really something.  Of course, being Andy Flynn, he manages to bungle things by getting carried away by his family’s enthusiasm for Sharon and how she reflects on him (and no surprise they’d react that way when he shows up with an intelligent, age-appropriate, beautiful, sophisticated yet approachable [when she wants to be, heh] woman after decades of being a playboy) and letting them think something that isn’t true, something that’s now threatening to bite him in the ass – at the holidays, when it’s most important to him (going back to Living Proof [The Closer] when he was relieved to finally be invited to spend Christmas with his family, only to wind up having to miss it for work).

I like Provenza’s and Sharon’s reactions to him.  Provenza knows what’s going on and is thus a little sympathetic and a lot annoyed, and Sharon doesn’t so she’s just mildly baffled by this new set of behaviors from her lieutenant.  “What’s wrong with Andy, is he depressed?”  “No, he’s depressing.” 

I like that Provenza ultimately offers to go with Andy and make up a cover story; I love their bickering, but I also love the ways they try to help each other out.  They truly are the old married couple of the show, as Tony Denison said in the same DVD special feature – they love each other, but they constantly drive each other crazy.

On one hand, I also like Sharon telling Andy she’ll go with him to The Nutcracker either way, but would he like to tell her what’s really going on, and him answering, “Uh, no, not really.”  But, on the other, I don’t like the idea of her being used as a prop, even under these circumstances.  She doesn’t trust easily and she values honesty; if someone says the wrong thing at the ballet, it’s not just Andy who is going to be embarrassed. 

I guess that bothers me because I like the signs they’re becoming something of a support system to each other.  Given Sharon’s own history with an addict, I think it means a lot to Andy for her to help him bridge the gap with his family – for her, of all people, to think he’s worth them trusting is meaningful.  And she has a growing bond of sorts with Provenza, but one that largely exists around Rusty; she’s a bit circumspect in what she can discuss about her job worries with her second in command, so for Andy to be someone she can let her guard down with just a little without worrying how the squad will perceive her is nice.

(Random note: Sharon is wearing the same blazer when Andy asks her to come with him to The Nutcracker she was when she invited herself to the wedding.  It’s a cuter outfit this time; I never thought it coordinated well with the dress she was wearing it with before.)

There’s some fun stuff out of that, too, like Provenza’s mini-fit at hearing Andy repeatedly refer to Sharon by her first name, and:

“Why would you lie to your ex-wife?”
“I don’t know, force of habit.”

“[My step-grandsons are going to be in The Nutcracker.]”
“I’m not going.”
“What?  God, no, I’m not asking you. … Do you think if I asked the Captain she’d take it the wrong way?”
“Probably not, but if you have an extra ticket, who you should really ask along is your psychiatrist, so he can ask you what the hell you’re thinking.”

I like the case, too, and not just for how Andy relates to the victim’s misguided but heartfelt attempts, but also for its cast of characters: Wifey, Sonny, Roomie, Techy/Scammy, Limpy, and Doc.  (They should have given the brother-in-law a name, so there’d be seven.)  Roomie, Limpy, and Techy/Scammy are very amusing. 

I like everything that happens with Roomie once he says he’d like to speak in confidence; they should have brought out the Privacy sign.  “Oh, sir, the police hate jumping to conclusions worse than anything.”  And the way they wave off his warning that his prints may be on the car.

Limpy’s recounting of how he caught the bus, and how he beat Techy/Scammy with his crutch is fun, too, including Sharon and Julio’s reactions to his protests and re-enactment.

Techy/Scammy pointing out he’s using “literally” correctly, looking back on his failed apps, and asking why people always sound so shocked when they say he’s been helpful is also entertaining.  I like Sharon’s low-key version of the V-8 head smack when his analogy makes her realize about the poker chips. 

I hadn’t come up with a killer until the scene at the house following Sharon’s realization; as soon as the wife started talking then, I knew it was her.

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I remember when these episodes first aired that there was a lot of hate for Rios,

Good, because she's appalling.  I hate her, as I've probably bored everyone to tears expressing, and she is, of course, the downside of this episode for me.  But not only does Sharon get her usual turn with her (“Emma feels left out of the loop” cracks me up), but Rusty gets to put her in her place, too, scoffing at her purported concern for him and being the one to say she is trying to stop him from seeing a doctor and that’s really fucked up.  Having acknowledged that the audience hates her (it certainly worked on me!), they seem to be trying to rehabilitate her somewhat in this stretch of the season, presenting her as just really dedicated to the legal system.  That, however, is not working on me, but I do think she’s genuine in some of the things she says.

I like that, while Sharon waves Provenza off and lets Rusty complete his outburst to Emma, she is completely “Momma has no time for your nonsense” at home when he’s flailing about over who’ll read the summary of the psych evaluation. 

Edited by Bastet.
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19 minutes ago, Bastet said:

I also like him answering her question about what he might want to be when he grows up with, “A witness, obviously, because this trial is going to last the rest of my life.”

Yes, thank you for quoting that. I was trying to remember. Great line!

I thought the brother had a Seven Dwarfs name too. No?

Roomie was played by Joe Flanigan, who was the lead on Stargate Atlantis. I really liked him in that, but he hasn't done much since.

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1 hour ago, shapeshifter said:

I thought the brother had a Seven Dwarfs name too. No?

Yeah, I got that confused in complaining about it -- the victim's brother-in-law is "Doc," so does have a Seven Dwarfs name.  The problem is not that the seventh suspect doesn't have a dwarf name, it's that there is no seventh -- there's Wifey, Sonny, Roomie, Techy (whom Tao renames Scammy), Limpy, and Doc (whom Provenza modifies to Grumpy Doc).  Six.  They should have written a seventh suspect. 

Edited by Bastet.
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