Jump to content

The Lowdown: The Get Down in the Media

Quote

Part One of The Get Down, comprising six episodes, premieres Friday, August 12 on Netflix around the world.

From Baz Luhrmann and a team of collaborators including four-time Oscar(R) winner and fellow executive producer Catherine Martin, legendary MC and executive producer Nas, associate producer Grandmaster Flash, Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, co-creator and executive producer Stephen Adly Guirgis; and expert collaborators, including hip-hop historian and supervising producer Nelson George, The Get Down is a mythic saga of how New York at the brink of bankruptcy gave birth to a new art form. Set in New York in 1977, this music-driven drama series chronicles the rise of hip-hop and the last days of disco -- told through the lives, music, art and dance of the South Bronx kids who would change the world forever.

The cast of the The Get Down includes Shameik Moore (Shaolin Fantastic), Justice Smith (Ezekiel "Books" Figuero), Herizen Guardiola (Mylene Cruz), Yahya Abdul-Mateen II (Cadillac), Jaden Smith (Dizzee Kipling), Skylan Brooks (Ra Ra Kipling), Tremaine Brown Jr. (Boo Boo Kiping), Mamoudou Athie (Grandmaster Flash), Jimmy Smits (Francisco "Papa Fuerte" Cruz) and Giancarlo Esposito (Ramon Cruz).

The Get Down is produced by Sony Pictures Television for Netflix. The series is executive produced by Baz Luhrmann, Catherine Martin, Nas, Stephen Adly Guirgis, Thomas Kelly, and Paul Watters.

http://www.thefutoncritic.com/video/2016/07/25/video-the-get-down-official-trailer-release-592302/20160725netflix02/

Edited by Trini.
0

Share Post


Link to post

‘The Get Down’ Debuts Hip-Hop Inspired Posters:

TGD_2Sht_US-640x490.jpg

'How Baz Luhrmann's Netflix Series 'The Get Down' Painstakingly Re-Created the '70s':

Quote

The task of transforming a now-slick Manhattan, and bringing the Bronx back to the burned-out shell it was 40 years ago, fell to Martin, production designer Karen Murphy and costume designer Jeriana San Juan. DJ Kool Herc, Afrika Bambaataa and Grandmaster Flash (who is an executive producer) contributed oral histories for reference, while high school yearbooks and the private archives of hip-hop photographers such as Joe Conzo provided a visual blueprint. For authentic exterior shots, street artists including Lady Pink and Crash and Daze consulted, with Martin translating their aesthetic: "We shot in St. Mary's Park [in the Bronx] and painted all the rocks with a special solution that would allow us to wash off the graffiti when shooting was done," says Martin, who also covered walls at the Bronx's Andrew Freedman Home library in paper, which was painted on to show decay. "Mainly, we removed tons of window air-conditioner units" in postproduction.

0

Share Post


Link to post

A few reviews:

Hollywood Reporter:

Quote

It's typical Luhrmann: adrenalized pop that seems, in this case, as logical as Andy Warhol humping Jeff Koons in Yankee Stadium — familiar reference points of a time, haphazardly thrown on a canvas by someone who never witnessed it originally. Perhaps it’s a stylized ode, but it comes off as, well, both artistically ill-advised and confusing.

...

No matter what model Netflix is employing here, it's not inconceivable to think that half the audience will flee in head-shaking disappointment while the others go all-in for its eccentricities. At Netflix, where ratings don't really matter given the business model, that kind of polarizing premiere might be less worrisome than whether buzz will attract current subscribers and, more importantly, new ones. But on a purely creative level there's no getting around the fact that The Get Down is a show looking for a tone or, perhaps more accurately, a show that seemingly finds that tone by fleeing the excesses of its creator.

Which is odd.

TV Line:

Quote

There’s no lack of ambition in the three episodes of The Get Down that were screened for critics. It touches on issues of political graft and urban renewal, devotes entire scenes to the mechanics of dropping the needle on the record, and explores the sacrifices and compromises artists make as they try to make their dreams come true.

EPs Luhrmann, Catherine Martin and rap star Nas don’t succeed in equal measures in exploring the myriad themes. As Bronx kingpin/community organizer Francisco Cruz, Jimmy Smits practically twirls his nonexistent moustache with comic-book absurdity, while another subplot includes a supposedly ferocious Bronx street gang that’s inexplicably styled like they stumbled out of NBC’s Peter Pan Live!

NY Times:

Quote

In actuality, though, “The Get Down” is more like a secret superhero story, one with black and brown teenagers as the heroes. Using extravagant camerawork and technical tricks that present the protagonists as larger than life, “The Get Down” takes a period and place that’s often approached with dutiful naturalism and sobriety about difficult circumstances and infuses it with light touches of magical realism and bursts of palpable otherworldly joy.

Deadline:

Quote

... The Get Down is not just the sum of its much-sampled parts but all about the groove – even if it takes a bit to find it.

0

Share Post


Link to post

I haven't watched the show yet but had it on my list. Should I give it a go or not? The reviews are mixed which makes me not want to dive in because there is too much media out there to consume.

1

Share Post


Link to post

There is a lot of media, but you owe this little treasure a look. It's excellent, and only 6 episodes.

0

Share Post


Link to post

Part II of the Get Down has been released on Netflix.    Looks to be 5 new episodes.

0

Share Post


Link to post

Despite the fact that Baz Luhrmann said just last month that he, Sony, and Netflix were all eager to work on S2, The Get Down has been cancelled

From the Vulture article in April:

Quote

V: Let’s talk about the possibility of season two. Did you make the season one finale expecting to get another batch of episodes, or thinking this would be it? And if there is ultimately a season two, how involved will you be?

BL: To be honest, we have already developed the opening of the next season. Sony and Netflix have been very driven about having a second season. There has been no question about that. They really want it. The issue is, and it is a simple truth: I never saw myself as the showrunner. I didn’t even know what that was. We tried to find the appropriate people to [serve as showrunner], guys who do that, and they were great. And they had great credentials. But it just wasn’t moving forward. At some point, Sony asked would I come and get more involved at the center of it. And I did. I just did everything I could to keep it creatively moving forward and keep the standards up.

V: But you don’t want to serve that role in a season two.

BL: I cannot really be at the center of it. At a certain point, you go, you know, I have a family and I can’t be central to it, and I don’t think I should be. Having said that, way back in the very beginning of this, and I won’t say who it was, but there is an African-American director who is absolutely the best of the best for this, and always was. I tried to get him involved and I couldn’t. I don’t want to be tease-y, but we’re all trying to hope to make that work out. That’s what we’re hoping. As Cindy Holland of Netflix said to me, “We are not in the habit of creating awesome characters and then throwing them away.” I thought that was a great quote. She said these characters live, and it’s our responsibility to try and find a way that they live on. That’s what we want to do. Is there formally a second season? No. I know they want it, and we’re trying to find a way that that can happen.

V: So you just need to find the right person to come on as showrunner.

BL: Yeah. We know the person we want it to be. There are others. But that is exactly right. And then I can go back to being what I always was going to be, which was kinda Uncle Baz. I would see cuts, and have a point of view, but be like an executive producer — a guy that was a well-wisher and a supporter and a giver of notes.

Baz Luhrman's Facebook post about the cancellation:

Quote

Dear fans of The Get Down,

I wanted to speak to you with an open heart and just acknowledge how humbled and moved that not only I, but all who have given so much to this production, have been by your passion and commitment to see the next chapter of The Get Down go back into production in the immediate future. I want to explain to you why that is unlikely to happen...

When I was asked to come to the center of The Get Down to help realize it, I had to defer a film directing commitment for at least two years. This exclusivity has understandably become a sticking point for Netflix and Sony, who have been tremendous partners and supporters of the show. It kills me that I can’t split myself into two and make myself available to both productions. I feel so deeply connected to all those who I have worked and collaborated with on this remarkable experience.

All sorts of things have been thrown around for the future... even a stage show (can you imagine that? I can, concert version anyone? Next summer? Just saying.) But the simple truth is, I make movies. And the thing with movies is, that when you direct them, there can be nothing else in your life. Since The Get Down stopped, I have actually been spending the last few months preparing my new cinematic work...

The cast of this show is unique and exceptional. Apart from our stellar veteran actors, I can’t tell you how privileged we all felt to have found such young, new talents, many of whom are now starring in motion pictures, creating music, and taking tremendous strides in their careers. Our cast, writers, musical collaborators, choreographers, camera team, directing and post-production teams all felt the profound privilege to have been embraced by the borough of The Bronx and the Hip-Hop community at large. But most especially by the forefathers of Hip-Hop: Grandmaster Flash, Kool Herc, Afrika Bambaataa, Grandmaster Caz, Kurtis Blow, Raheim and all the b-boys, b-girls, graffiti-writers, MC’s and DJ’s that made this story possible. As well as the keepers of the flame and guiding lights, such as Nas. We experienced things together that I will never forget. All of us in The Get Down family have been touched by this precious mission of telling the pre-history of a form of culture that would go on to change not only the city, but the world.

As for the real future of the show, the spirit of The Get Down, and the story it has begun to tell... it has its own life. One that lives on today and will continue to be told somewhere, somehow, because of you, the fans and the supporters.

Humbled and honored, and to quote Mylene’s beautiful ballad, “I’ll see you on the other-side..."

Best,

Baz

Edited by ElectricBoogaloo.
0

Share Post


Link to post

I'm so disappointed about this! There was so much story left to tell.

0

Share Post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now