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Small Talk: Out of Genoa

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stewedsquash here, came over from twop. Only other mb I participate in is the wonderful land of Snarkfest. I am really enjoying Previouslytv so far. There is a camaraderie here with the mods and the posters (so far!) that was getting lost in the shuffle elsewhere. Looking forward to the new way of doing things here. What I find enjoyable so far are these Small Talk threads. I think it will enhance my MB experience a great deal.

I am a NC'er. Family here since the beginning of the states. I also claim Silver Springs MD/Hanover PA area from my mother's side. Haven't been there for probably 20 years but most of my growing up time until 10th grade was up there, summers down here then the switch was made and I have been here for 30 plus years. 

As soon as I get my nerve up and my turkeys settled, I am going to go on a road trip. I have no clue where, but I am loading up and heading out.

edited for grammar, hopefully all of it.......

Edited by stewedsquash.
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Hi there!  I'm over here from TWOP also, I used to post under 'pez524', though I was never a really frequent poster, I always kept up with the site.  I'm a lifetime Y&R viewer, starting from being at my grandma's house while she watched her stories.  She took them seriously, every one knew never to call during them, in the days before VCR's and DVR's (seems so long ago!).  My grandma watched, my mom watched, and I watched.

I'm an Ohioan, and looking so forward to spring after the winter we've had!!!

Looking forward to being able to continue discussing Y&R over here!

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Hi everyone! Like marshmallow, I am a lifetime Y&R viewer. The show began when my mom was pregnant with my younger brother, so I have been hearing "Nadia's Theme" since I was three. The old-time characters (Nikki, Paul, Victor from that days of Julia and the dungeon, Jill, Mrs. Chancellor) have been in my life longer than anyone else besides my parents! Crazy. There was one time -- I think it may have been when Lauren was buried alive -- when my mom actually kept me home from school so we could watch together. My grandma and aunts watched too.

In any case, I have been reading and laughing at the comments at TWOP for a long time, and am so glad to see you all here! I look forward to many many more years of snark.

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*waving*  I'm a lifetimer too.  Marshmallow your story about your grandmother could be mine!  I started watching at the knee of my abuela who could not be interrupted when her "stories" were on.   My mom had always been an ABC watcher so when I saw YR which was so unlike anything I'd ever witnessed in my home.  There was always something so unique about the lighting, the music and the sets and those things combined with the stories and characters really set it apart in my mind.  I still have vivid memories of when Katharine Chancellor was first brought into the show. Once I saw her with her huge jewels on her long manicured talons  while wearing any number of muumuus she owned; all while flashing those beautiful blue eyes as she enunciated every word just so and I knew there was no looking back.   God Rest Jeanne Cooper.  

I'm a native Texan who moved to Oregon about 24 years ago, I love both places and consider them home.  I always enjoyed TWoP and even though I haven't been as into YR these past few months, TWoP was always my place to keep up and get the daily laugh. There have been some fabulously witty and snarky posters over the years and I'm glad to see that some have moved over here.  With any luck there will be more and perhaps some old timers showing back up.   

I agree with Stewed, there seems to be a good vibe here already and I'm looking forward to seeing what this place can become! 

Edited by PsychedelicTrip.
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I got hooked from the first episode I watched.I learned of Y&R from a fellow college student I carpooled with. Then I noticed it was on the TV sets in the lounges and couldn't stop watching. That was 40 years ago. I have loved and lost many characters over the years but it was the loss of Jeanne Cooper that has meant the most. Such a powerhouse! As hokey as it is,I love the fact that the show now has a park named after her.  

I live in Canada and am eagerly awaiting spring. It's so damned late this year and it's been so depressing.

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I was in Jr. High. I was home on Easter vacation. I looked in the TV Guide and saw a new show listed called The Young and The Restless. I said, "I'm young and restless. I'll watch this."

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 I am an almost lifer. LOL I started watching in 1977 was home with a really bad flu and missed 2 weeks of school and I got hooked. I have been watching since then.  I used to love this show but have found I am only watching out of habit not out of any great love for the show.  I am in Canada as well and am so sick of all the snow. We have had a horrible winter and I am ready to get in my gardens and plant.. I am married and have a 17 yr old boy. I am also a total animal lover and have 4 cats and 2 dogs and am looking for another doggy. I also watch days and B&B and that is only cuz Y&R has gotten so bad.. Also love Dallas, the following, and the blacklist :)

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Crosby, There is a thread for dogs here somewhere. I keep forgetting to bookmark it. And no, you can't put a picture of Sharon there in the ugliest dog category(haha).

peach, your excitement about writing recaps is fun to watch. What is your writing experience? You seem to have a knack for picking up little details and expanding on them. Perhaps you have found an outlet to release your inner snark.

Edited by stewedsquash.
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I think I picked up on Y & R in the 80s after my daughter was born. And I can certainly rememeber Terry Lester and Brenda Dickson [we wouldn't get casting choices that tangy today]. Actually it was my third soap--in graduate school I hit on GH and stuck with it for a bit--but the show I have the longest, although intermittent, history with is Coronation Street, so for US soaps, it's Y & R, and for UK soaps, it's Corrie.

I'm another Canadian--and I used to cackle when Lauren referred to my city as "Torontow." Apparently no one cued her about saying "Taranna." The daughter previously mentioned is now in grad school; I'm an academic and a writer, and I have four cats. Because I now sound like an idiot, I'll stop there.

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Is it really Taranna? I can't even wrap my mouth around that pronunciation. Is it a local thing? Because Fayetteville is pronounced Fed-vull around these parts. 

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Yup. Sometimes, you'll hear "Tronno," but that's about the range of pronunciation-possibilities. There was even a joke in that Ben Affleck movie, Argo, about this--they were training US embassy employees to "pass" as Canadians, and had to correct the way they said the city's name. Mind you, now that our crack-smoking pig of a mayor is big news, more people may learn our quaint custom.

I envy you being from the South...

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pearlite, living in the south in the US is wonderful. I think living anywhere in the US is wonderful. It's a great country. Flawed, but great. In the south you have all the great stereotypes, they actually exist. But if you look past (passed??) the stereotypes and see the people behind them, it's worth doing. Like all of the US, my area is changing from when I grew up. There are people from all over. Stores are changing. But the essence of the south, southern charm, the slowness of a day, walking in a field, making biscuits,  asking who your Daddy is, it's all still here.

I think living in Canada would be great also! I love to watch shows from up there. There was a show, Property Shop, that I adored! I love Tatiana and her big, poofy, curly blonde hair! I really miss that show. I am an idiot about your country. I have no idea where Montreal, Toronto etc, are. There was a man who lived here who was from England and his wife was from Trinidad. They built a cute little house that looked like a small storybook house on some land they purchased. But there was something about their visas and they had to sell it and now they live in Canada. They have invited us to visit, they have land and hunting where they live, but I doubt we will ever make it up there. My hope is that one day, in my 50's, I will finally take a road trip and just galavant all over. I do that now, just around here. 

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I think a lot of my envy is based on memories. When I was a child, we drove to Miami and Lauderdale every year through the Carolinas and Georgia--I loved it all, and missed that when we started flying south. Plus, I have a lot of family on the east coast in Philadelphia, Florida, and NY, so the border was never a big deal to us. I do love your definition of "the essence of the south"--complete with the stinger at the end.

pearlite, living in the south in the US is wonderful. I think living anywhere in the US is wonderful. It's a great country. Flawed, but great. But the essence of the south, southern charm, the slowness of a day, walking in a field, making biscuits,  asking who your Daddy is, it's all still here.

I think living in Canada would be great also! I love to watch shows from up there. There was a show, Property Shop, that I adored! I love Tatiana and her big, poofy, curly blonde hair! I really miss that show. I am an idiot about your country. I have no idea where Montreal, Toronto etc, are. There was a man who lived here who was from England and his wife was from Trinidad. They built a cute little house that looked like a small storybook house on some land they purchased. But there was something about their visas and they had to sell it and now they live in Canada. They have invited us to visit, they have land and hunting where they live, but I doubt we will ever make it up there. My hope is that one day, in my 50's, I will finally take a road trip and just galavant all over. I do that now, just around here. 

Jeez, you watch Canadian TV shows? I avoid them like the proverbial plague--I know they sell well in international markets, like Murdoch Mysteries, and so on, but bleah, where I'm concerned.

I suspect there are a lot of Canadas, depending on where someone is from, just like there are a lot of USAs, for much the same reason. We are huge countries, and very few cliches about either of us would be true.

p.s., Taranna is on the north shore of Lake Ontario, and farther south than Genoa City.

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I'm another Canadian; I live just west of Toronto, in the land where Hurricane Hazel rules (GTA folks will understand that :)). I pronounce Toronto just like it's spelled, or maybe "Tronto", not "Trawna". The only people I knew who pronounced it "Trawna" were my grandparents, who were rural-Ontario born and bred.

I started watching Y&R in 1988, my first year of university, and continued to watch for maybe 10 years, until I was working full-time. Lost track of it for several years, and then started watching again two or three years ago. My mother-in-law has watched it from its beginning.

As far as Canadian TV shows, I must recommend Republic of Doyle. It's about a father-and-son private investigative team, and it takes place in St. John's, Newfoundland. It's a great show, lots of action car chases etc., and the scenery is simply stunning. And Allan Hawco, the star/writer/producer, is a hottie too ;) Oh, and Russell Crowe guest-starred on it a couple of years ago!

Edited by Capricasix.
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All right, Capricasix, sometimes I do pronounce that second "t." But, assuming I'm right in thinking somewhere between Mimico and Port Credit, I'd say the true test whether or not someone adds the second "g" that isn't there in Eglinton. I misspelled it for years, thinking the "g" was there...

A lot of friends watch and love Republic of Doyle--mea culpa, I tried, honest. But I can only get as far as the crappy Canadian versions of the cooking shows, like Masterchef Canada, and I think those are in the "love to hate" bin.

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Crosby, There is a thread for dogs here somewhere. I keep forgetting to bookmark it. And no, you can't put a picture of Sharon there in the ugliest dog category(haha).

LOL I almost called my last dog Sharin but thought it would show my obsession too much ;) JOKING ..... will go look for the dog thread

Edited by crosby777.
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And I can certainly rememeber Terry Lester and Brenda Dickson

MY absolute faves.

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"Tronto"

I lived there in my youth and said it this way too.. but I did hear the other taranna.. I am from Vancouver but now live on the other coast near  Halifax..

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You have had one evil winter in the Maritimes, haven't you?

We gripe here, and the power outages in T----o are getting a bit much, but we haven't endured anything like you have there.

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OMG yes.. it has been evil.. I am so sick of winter. We have been lucky where I live for power.. we only lost it one time for 2 hours. But the snow and cold has been miserable. I am just starting to be able to work outside. And only for short spurts cuz it is so cold.

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All right, Capricasix, sometimes I do pronounce that second "t." But, assuming I'm right in thinking somewhere between Mimico and Port Credit, I'd say the true test whether or not someone adds the second "g" that isn't there in Eglinton. I misspelled it for years, thinking the "g" was there...

A lot of friends watch and love Republic of Doyle--mea culpa, I tried, honest. But I can only get as far as the crappy Canadian versions of the cooking shows, like Masterchef Canada, and I think those are in the "love to hate" bin.

I think many Canadians don't realize that several popular shows (at least, judging by their Internet buzz) are Canadian - Lost Girl, Continuum, Haven, Orphan Black are a few that come to mind. I don't watch Orphan Black, but that's only because I don't have cable and thus don't get the Space channel, and also I have other shows, and a very long list of books to read, competing for my attention :D (not to mention my kids!)

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I'm Jason and I'm more of a Y&R lurker these days, I figured after TWoP ended I'll just log in with FB and retire the "SpecialBrew" nickname. I'm on a LOT of political blogs and social history forums as "myself" so why keep my television addictions buried in the closet right?

 

Just curious: any theories on why there is such a Canadian contingency for Y&R? Or is it just coincidence/TWoP thing? Is it the #1 soap in Canada? Are soaps doing better there overall? Although I know the four remaining soaps are indeed on a slight upswing, the genre really suffered in the mid 1990s-2012 or so period. However, I know in Latin America they are still very hot and prime time has taken a lot of the best aspects of soaps over the last 20 years.

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In addition to that, I'd like to know why the episodes air a day early in Canada?  

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Umm, let's see if I can explain this in any coherent way.

 

The Canadian rights to Y & R are owned by a network called CanWest Global. Thirty years or so ago, before satellite broadcasting and so on [Global uses the Cdn Anik satellite carrier for the show now], Canadian network stations who carried CBS content didn't reach enough distant areas to generate enough advertising income/viewership for CBS.

 

So, Global, who had and have the reach into a huge number of our markets, cut this deal with CBS, allowing their network to broadcast the show a day ahead--but not quite a day ahead, actually**. CBS makes much more advertising revenue, and the show airs many times a day, depending on the feeds from whichever time-zone your cable or satellite server supplies.

 

**Originally, and still, US affiliate stations in various Cdn cities do still air the US day's show at 12:30PM. The Cdn-next day's episode aired, and still does, at 4:30PM--so there was always a four-hour lag between the two airings.

 

There was also something involving the CRTC [Canadian Radio-Television Commission] ruling on Canadian content, but I'm damned if I can remember what it was. Mainly, the whole thing involved Global-Canwest's ability to generate more ad-dollars for CBC. The network made a great deal, and the show has a gigantic Canadian following--hence, the sporadic [usually dumb] references to Canada on Y & R.

 

Did I put you to sleep yet?

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I guess my previous spiel addressed your first couple of questions.

 

Just curious: any theories on why there is such a Canadian contingency for Y&R? Or is it just coincidence/TWoP thing? Is it the #1 soap in Canada? Are soaps doing better there overall? Although I know the four remaining soaps are indeed on a slight upswing, the genre really suffered in the mid 1990s-2012 or so period. However, I know in Latin America they are still very hot and prime time has taken a lot of the best aspects of soaps over the last 20 years.

Don't know about ratings here, but certainly Y & R scores much higher than B & B.

 

Umm, where primetime Cdn shows using serial storyline style are concerned, one of the other Canadian posters could help you out. I'm the one who loathes Canadian series...

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Thank you, pearlite!  It's confusing, but it seems like anything related to the media business is confusing.  I just switched cable/internet companies, and, for the life of me, I don't understand what the hell I signed up for.  

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When I said I watched Canadian shows, I meant that I watch shows that are shown in the US but filmed in Canada. Mostly HGTV shows and some cooking shows. Since I am probably the only person in the universe who actually likes cold weather I should probably move to Canada. I think I have a new goal for my 50's. 

 

From the MM thread about teachers:

 

My son's algebra teacher told my husband that he read a study that kids who lived in the country or were exposed to more than book learning had better life skills and were able to adapt to more situations in life. We have always stressed book learning in our house and also, thanks to my extremely smart better half, they all three have skills that require thinking/labor. They can fix their own vehicles, do body work, operate heavy machinery, weld, build houses, etc. I wish that schools would go back to the days of yore when they taught these kinds of skills in high school. For girls also but mostly so we wouldn't have lost so many generations of boys to not having skills. I think they need more "shop" classes and more home ec classes for both sexes.

Off my soap box.

 

Man I have had the best day today because I stopped at my favorite taquiera joint and got a beef brisket taco on a from scratch flour shell loaded with rice, kettle beans, chopped white onions and cilantro and ate it on my side porch. I did not completely splurge though because I skipped the fried chicarone's. THIS TIME. Forget Taco Bell and Chipotle, these little rinky dink authentic Mexican places are the BEST around here. Although I do have a soft spot for Taco Bell's breakfast crunch wraps, as has been noted before.

Edited by stewedsquash.
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Oh, I sometimes watch our version of the Food Network myself. But it's pretty much US competition shows where someone pushes a grocery cart to victory. MInd you, I've all but given up on network TV from either country at this point, and I find that kind of depressing. If I could find a few more UK shows [Doc Martin, George Gently, and so on], I'd be good, but those only show up sporadically here. I really have to replace my daughter's old barely functioning Mac book that's slaved to the big TV so I can actually shop for some more shows online.

 

Now, the cold weather... Well, that varies wildly from place to place. Toronto is hardly the Manila of the North, but other than this past winter, it's not too bad. You might enjoy the wider variance in seasons, and our famous politeness [snerk]...or maybe our butter tarts...

When I said I watched Canadian shows, I meant that I watch shows that are shown in the US but filmed in Canada. Mostly HGTV shows and some cooking shows. Since I am probably the only person in the universe who actually likes cold weather I should probably move to Canada. I think I have a new goal for my 50's. 

 

From the MM thread about teachers:

 

My son's algebra teacher told my husband that he read a study that kids who lived in the country or were exposed to more than book learning had better life skills and were able to adapt to more situations in life. We have always stressed book learning in our house and also, thanks to my extremely smart better half, they all three have skills that require thinking/labor. They can fix their own vehicles, do body work, operate heavy machinery, weld, build houses, etc. I wish that schools would go back to the days of yore when they taught these kinds of skills in high school. For girls also but mostly so we wouldn't have lost so many generations of boys to not having skills. I think they need more "shop" classes and more home ec classes for both sexes.

Off my soap box.

 

Man I have had the best day today because I stopped at my favorite taquiera joint and got a beef brisket taco on a from scratch flour shell loaded with rice, kettle beans, chopped white onions and cilantro and ate it on my side porch. I did not completely splurge though because I skipped the fried chicarone's. THIS TIME. Forget Taco Bell and Chipotle, these little rinky dink authentic Mexican places are the BEST around here. Although I do have a soft spot for Taco Bell's breakfast crunch wraps, as has been noted before.

There's a lot to what you're saying in that middle paragraph. I don't know if this is the case in parts of the US, but because of the lack of training and education in skilled trades at a secondary-school level, and the perceived snob-appeal [snerk, part 2] of a degree, our universities, including the one where I teach, are full of students [or parents] who are paying a lot of money for degrees in which students have little interest, and for which many have little aptitude. The crappy BAs they end up with are kind of "bling"to them and there aren't a whole lotta jobs out there for the guy/girl third from the bottom of the class...

Meanwhile, the whole skilled trades area is starving for people, and should never have lost the respect it had in the first place.

 

Rant concluded.

 

Well, I did have a butter tart today, and I am making Chinese BBQ sauce, and that's about the best I've got in that area.

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Well, I think many Canadian TV shows are pretty good - Republic of Doyle, Flashpoint, Remedy, Rookie Blue, Orphan Black, to name only a few.

Pearlite, where do you teach? What subject? And I love butter tarts *drool*

Edited by Capricasix.
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I've been wanting to see Republic of Doyle because it's in Newfoundland.  I lived there on the Navy base in Argentia (shows how old I am!).  Is there any way to see it besides paying ridiculous prices for the DVDs?  As a kid, I thought that was just the best place ever.  Where else could you play in swamps and ammo dumps and have moose burgers on the weekends?

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http://fooddaycanada.ca/recipes/butter-tarts/

 

Is the above what y'all are talking about? I googled butter tarts and Butter Tarts Toronto came up so I clicked it and the above came up. The recipe above is what we call pecan pie or pecan tarts if made in little shells. Except for the currants, we do NOT add those. 

 

It is weird how in the last 4 years I have been bombarded with things Canadian...

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Yup, that's a butter tart. One of endless versions of them, I guess.

 

I think I refer to them sort of jokingly because we [let's limit this to southern Ontario] don't really have any native "cuisine."** And, yes, butter tarts are pretty much what the base of a pecan pie is [sans pecans], or a chess tart, or vinegar pie--I remember those last two from when I was a kid visiting the South. In Quebec, they make maple sugar pie, which has started to show up here now and then--not quite the same thing. Butter tarts, in my background, have raisins in them, no currants. But because Toronto is foodie-central, the humble butter tart is now some kind of big deal--some fancy-schmancy bakeries putting bacon in them, and so on. Spare me.

They're ordinary food, and probably were something people could make with the stuff on hand in the house.

**Speaking of Canadian "cuisine," and I'm using the term loosely here, somebody mentioned that Sharon Case, who was just in TO, tweeted that she tried poutine, that notable gourmet item [irony] of Quebec [not so much other parts of Canada] cooking. Poutine is basically Quebec food-truck/greasy spoon food. It's what we call "chips and gravy" [chips = french fries], with the addition of cheese curds. But now it's so trendy that people put foie gras and truffles on the fries. Spare me again, please.

http://fooddaycanada.ca/recipes/butter-tarts/

 

Is the above what y'all are talking about? I googled butter tarts and Butter Tarts Toronto came up so I clicked it and the above came up. The recipe above is what we call pecan pie or pecan tarts if made in little shells. Except for the currants, we do NOT add those. 

 

It is weird how in the last 4 years I have been bombarded with things Canadian...

Well, we're flattered. But you've got more interesting food, and probably no snow.


Oh, I'm sad that I haven't enjoyed those shows--I'd like to, believe me.

 

Well, I think many Canadian TV shows are pretty good - Republic of Doyle, Flashpoint, Remedy, Rookie Blue, Orphan Black, to name only a few.

Pearlite, where do you teach? What subject? And I love butter tarts *drool*

I teach at York--mainly subjects involving writing and design--in the Professional Writing program, and I teach film.

 

Well, now, having talked about butter tarts, I'm gonna have to take a shot at making them again. I always cook when I'm off for a while, mainly because I get fidgety and don't want to keep "spring cleaning." People here are charging ridiculous prices at the trendy bakeries: a $5 butter tart?

Actually stewedsquash's link reminded me about golden syrup, which I'm addicted to. I've never used it to make BTs [usually it's corn syrup], but the time may have come.


I've been wanting to see Republic of Doyle because it's in Newfoundland.  I lived there on the Navy base in Argentia (shows how old I am!).  Is there any way to see it besides paying ridiculous prices for the DVDs?  As a kid, I thought that was just the best place ever.  Where else could you play in swamps and ammo dumps and have moose burgers on the weekends?

Wow, that's genuinely interesting! I've met the odd Newf, and they are a group apart, for sure. So you were right near the coast?

 

And you ate moose? Good Lord! I've never even seen a live one... No cod's cheeks, or scruncheons? You were definitely too young for screech.

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I've always thought the Newfies (sorry if that's racist, or whatever) were a very close version of Irish mixed with southern redneck (again, sorry).  Yes, the base was right on the coast south and west of St. John's a couple of miles from Placentia.  All fishing villages once you got off base.  Back then it was at least a 50 mile ride to St. John's on a gravel road.  There was no interstate.  The fog and the blizzards could be epic.  But, man, for a kid nothing was better.  I've been told the adults didn't share our feelings.  It was a very isolated existence.  

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So what I am taking away from this is that the butter tart is the crust? We call that the pie shell. And the currants being added make me think about my PA Dutch country side of the family and their mince meat pies.

 

I discovered this website when I was looking for a recipe. This man is about an hour and or more away from where I live so some of the things he does is different from the way it is done here. But I do make my buttermilk biscuits, chicken and pastry, cabbage casserole, country ham/red eye gravy with grits/toast just like he does. The pecan pie is not the same as what I do, we don't use corn meal and prefer to use Pet Ritz regular pie crusts in the freezer section. Thought there might be some interest in the website for finding out about true southern cooking, the old timey way. http://www.tasteofsouthern.com/mini-biscuits-recipe/  I make biscuits for just about every meal, they are like our rolls. I don't have ham in them all the time though! We dip them in molasses  or take King syrup mixed with butter and dip it in that.

 

Also from way back, yes I do the Eastern NC  bbq (bar-b-que) pig pickins (never with a G), with a vinegar/ketchup/red pepper flake sauce. It is a liquidy sauce, not thick at all. And our slaw is different here from other parts of NC. I just chop a cabbage fine but not too fine (it's an art to get it just right) then make a mayonaise (Duke's but being part Yankee I prefer Hellman's and use it mostly), vinegar, sugar, a little splash of milk, NEVER EVER EVER any salt. Mix it all together and let the slaw set up in fridge to get super cold. The cabbage will let loose with some water and it will get melded with the mayo mixed in. My brother lives in SC, upper middle western part and they do the mustard based bbq there. I love that style but around here it is forbidden. My mother brings me back plates from a bbq joint on her way back. They also have a delicious thing called hash (I think?) that they serve with it and it is terrific! I could eat it by the gallon.

 

Pig pickins around here have no borders, racial or economical. If you are in this area, you have most likely been to them. If you can't have your own, you find a great bbq joint and eat out.

 

eta I have been reminiscing in my mind back over my childhood food memories. It got me hungry for some of my Yankee side. I remember fondly my mom's aunts making fried chicken, which was different from my southern side's fried chicken, and then they would make a gravy from the drippings and pour it over saltine crackers in a big bowl. Sounds horrible but it was so good. 

Edited by stewedsquash.
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I love you so much for that website, Stewedsquash. My Mother passed away a number of years ago and with her went her recipes. She was from NC so these are things she made and living out west, I don't know anyone who can cook like this Thanks so much, I'm off to make biscuits! I will be cookin' southern and trying many things on that site.

Edited by thewhiteowl.
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So is this butter tart like a shoo-fly pie?

The best bbq chicken I ever had was in the Fort Green section of Brooklyn. There was this poorly lit store front with no name and there was this one guy and all he made were these small bbq'd chickens that you could either buy a half or a whole. And you got slices of white bread with it. And it was all to go. Man, it was good.

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So what I am taking away from this is that the butter tart is the crust? We call that the pie shell. And the currants being added make me think about my PA Dutch country side of the family and their mince meat pies.

 

I discovered this website when I was looking for a recipe. This man is about an hour and or more away from where I live so some of the things he does is different from the way it is done here. But I do make my buttermilk biscuits, chicken and pastry, cabbage casserole, country ham/red eye gravy with grits/toast just like he does. The pecan pie is not the same as what I do, we don't use corn meal and prefer to use Pet Ritz regular pie crusts in the freezer section. Thought there might be some interest in the website for finding out about true southern cooking, the old timey way. http://www.tasteofsouthern.com/mini-biscuits-recipe/  I make biscuits for just about every meal, they are like our rolls. I don't have ham in them all the time though! We dip them in molasses  or take King syrup mixed with butter and dip it in that.

 

Also from way back, yes I do the Eastern NC  bbq (bar-b-que) pig pickins (never with a G), with a vinegar/ketchup/red pepper flake sauce. It is a liquidy sauce, not thick at all. And our slaw is different here from other parts of NC. I just chop a cabbage fine but not too fine (it's an art to get it just right) then make a mayonaise (Duke's but being part Yankee I prefer Hellman's and use it mostly), vinegar, sugar, a little splash of milk, NEVER EVER EVER any salt. Mix it all together and let the slaw set up in fridge to get super cold. The cabbage will let loose with some water and it will get melded with the mayo mixed in. My brother lives in SC, upper middle western part and they do the mustard based bbq there. I love that style but around here it is forbidden. My mother brings me back plates from a bbq joint on her way back. They also have a delicious thing called hash (I think?) that they serve with it and it is terrific! I could eat it by the gallon.

 

Pig pickins around here have no borders, racial or economical. If you are in this area, you have most likely been to them. If you can't have your own, you find a great bbq joint and eat out.

 

eta I have been reminiscing in my mind back over my childhood food memories. It got me hungry for some of my Yankee side. I remember fondly my mom's aunts making fried chicken, which was different from my southern side's fried chicken, and then they would make a gravy from the drippings and pour it over saltine crackers in a big bowl. Sounds horrible but it was so good. 

Ah, Stewed, this is a great post, and I'll come back to it later--I just broke the glass on my phone and gotta replace it.

 

But, I mis-spoke myself there--the butter tart's crust is just the crust or pie-shell; butter, lard, shortening, or bought, whatever. I've never heard of putting cornmeal in pie crust--does it make it crispy? The filling is that syrup, brown sugar, egg thing that's like pecan pie filling and like the rest of those sweet pies. It's just a kind of gooey filling with some raisins in it [or not, some people prefer them with no raisins]. Not like mince pies or tarts, which are filled with that kind of dense mediaeval fruit and suet mixture--not the biggest fan, myself--I might eat one for ceremonial reasons around Christmas and leave it at that.

 

And thanks so much for the BBQ sauce update--I've always wanted to try the mustardy one. [The Chinese one I made the other day was not worth the sweat, BTW.]

 

You don't salt your cabbage and veg ahead for cole slaw? Re mayonnaise--to which I have a bad addiction--I've recently discovered Euro/Polish mayos-and they are quite different, and really good.

 

I'm going to check that website you posted wnen I get back, and thanks for that, too.

 

 

 

Nope, Newfies call themselves that--and, I'd guess from their accents, there's a lot of Irish in there. They are regarded by most of the rest of the country as kind of Appalachian, to get dainty about it. They have a lot of throwback traditions from the UK, like mummers and so on. Beyond that, my knowledge, unlike yours, is limited to TV and the odd acquaintance.

I've always thought the Newfies (sorry if that's racist, or whatever) were a very close version of Irish mixed with southern redneck (again, sorry).  Yes, the base was right on the coast south and west of St. John's a couple of miles from Placentia.  All fishing villages once you got off base.  Back then it was at least a 50 mile ride to St. John's on a gravel road.  There was no interstate.  The fog and the blizzards could be epic.  But, man, for a kid nothing was better.  I've been told the adults didn't share our feelings.  It was a very isolated existence.  

Nope, shoo-fly pie is dense and starchy with the molasses on the bottom, no? Mennonite-Germans in Ontario make it, so that's the only version I've had.

 

Butter tart filling is a kind of sweet, sometimes gooey suspension. Closest to chess pie or vinegar pie in the US. There's no starchy stuff in there.

 

So is this butter tart like a shoo-fly pie?

The best bbq chicken I ever had was in the Fort Green section of Brooklyn. There was this poorly lit store front with no name and there was this one guy and all he made were these small bbq'd chickens that you could either buy a half or a whole. And you got slices of white bread with it. And it was all to go. Man, it was good.

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Sweepea, now I am remembering the shoo fly pies! And Lebanon baloney. And whoopie pies. And potato rolls. We used to go to the Lancaster PA farmers market and get those things. And my go to cousin who would bring stuff down here from up there has retired to a gated community in southern Florida so pooh! And I can't remember the town, if it was Lancaster PA or Frederick MD but we used to go to a place called the Texas Hot Weiner Shop and get the best hotdogs and hamburgers. My mom got the chili recipe and I make it but you just can't duplicate the feel of the place. They would shape their hamburgers like hotdogs and serve them on hotdog buns.  Like your chicken place Sweepea, it was just a hole in the wall.

 

thewhiteowl,  wow I was not expecting that when I posted it. I love that website and am so glad you are going to use it! It really is authentic southern stuff. I love that he puts step by step pictures. Just looking at the pictures for the biscuits takes me back to my grandma's house. True southern biscuits are NOTHING like what is shown on food shows (so take that Paula, Bobby Flay). The key to making biscuits like around here is to mix the buttermilk and lard together. Most biscuit recipes add the lard or, shudder, shortening(!) to the flour. The way you mix is a crucial step if that is the way you remember your mother's biscuits. Another place you might look to is anything Alton Brown does, cookbooks or website. He has the tv show Good Eats. He is very entertaining and is a science of food geek. I loved his couple of cruising across America road shows he did a few years back. If you can watch any of his shows it is well worth it. He is the only southern Food Network star I trust.

 

pearlite, no we don't salt the cabbage, it is a slightly sweet dish, to accompany the vinegar sauce on the pork. Slaw also goes with chicken or just about any food. It is also not a set recipe. If I just want a normal bowl it would be one head of cabbage chopped, then mix together a dollop of mayo, splash of vinegar, pick up some sugar with your fingers and just enough milk to loosen it when mixed. And sprinkle black pepper on it after you smooth it out in the bowl. Ha, my mom says I get that from my grandma. I always smooth everything in bowls.

Edited by stewedsquash.
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For girls also but mostly so we wouldn't have lost so many generations of boys to not having skills. I think they need more "shop" classes and more home ec classes for both sexes.

 I think so too, way more life skill type classes too. 

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Hello, I'm Axella (AxJ from TWoP, but AxJ has other connotations and I no longer use that nickname). I moved here the first day, but still have a toe in the water over at TWop, sometimes.

I grew up in the suburbs of NY and am embarrassed to admit that I've never been to Canada. To my knowledge, no one in my immediate family had. People where I lived tended to think all of life was where we were, and weren't interested in the outside world. Some of my relatives still feel this way and rarely, if ever, leave New York state simply because they're not interested in doing so. Me, well, I moved to Australia and have lived here for 25 years. Ironically, we will visit St Johns NB on a cruise in August, so I'll finally make it to Canada! Yay! I keep promising a fellow musician in Toronto that I'll visit him one day, and I intend to do just that when I'm on a trip to NY at some time in the future. I do a fair bit of overseas traveling, so it probably won't be too far off.

I've watched Canadian TV over here, mostly HGTV stuff like "Love it or List It" (so contrived, but I still enjoy it sometimes) and "Property Brothers" (maybe they can get Jonathan to play Adam!). Sometimes we'll be watching a show and not even realise it's Canadian until I hear someone pronounce the word "out" as "oat". :-)
 

I grew up on ABC soaps since 1963 when I watched with my grandmother. I didn't get into Y&R until summer holidays when I was on a break from work. I had the TV on and got caught up in a "Is Victor dead?" cliffhanger one day when his car plunged over a cliff. I watched it off and on for years, starting with episodes broadcast in 1991, and have watched it steadily for about 10 years with my husband (he's finally given up on pretending he only watches it for my sake, but would positively DIE if the guys he works with ever found out. Men can be such funny creatures).

There are few network shows I watch - "Revenge" being one, and "Resurrection" being another (not sure if "Jeopardy!" counts). I love "Mad Men", really miss "Breaking Bad", and very much enjoy British shows like "Downton Abbey" and "Call the Midwife".

Thanks, Sweepea for mentioning shoo fly pie. I may make one tomorrow as today I discovered a jar of treacle in the pantry (molasses to Americans). I positively LOVE shoo fly pie (I was going to abbreviate it but then realised you may think I meant Steve Farren Phelps), after having had one years ago in PA. One of my daughters loves it as well, but my husband can't stand it! His loss, more for us. ;-)  I love homemade bread and have been baking a lot of garlic and rosemary baguettes lately. They're so easy! Trouble is when I bake them, I eat them.

 

Although I'm not really old enough to be considered a "retiree" I've just retired from my job (because I was sick of it). I bought some new HD video cameras so I can do my own cooking videos - mostly because my daughters asked me to for their benefit, and strictly for fun (I'm not as young ,glam, and thin as Avery, so no TV people will come knocking on my door!). I've done one so far on making bagels but my lapel mic wasn't working so I may re-do it. It's a lot of work to make one, and I get so annoyed by "Avery" and "Dullan" and their cavalier attitude towards the time-is-money production staff as she lets her personal life interfere with their work. But then I'm always getting annoyed at how Y&R portrays people's professions. :-D

 

Edited by AxellaJ.
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You know where I got the wilting the cabbage thing? Alton Brown.

He was brining things and I was thinking about that, and I had a cabbage, so... Now I do it all the time--along with wilted cucumbers with a slightly sweet sour cream, bit of sugar, bit of vinegar dressing.

 

pearlite, no we don't salt the cabbage, it is a slightly sweet dish, to accompany the vinegar sauce on the pork. Slaw also goes with chicken or just about any food. It is also not a set recipe. If I just want a normal bowl it would be one head of cabbage chopped, then mix together a dollop of mayo, splash of vinegar, pick up some sugar with your fingers and just enough milk to loosen it when mixed. And sprinkle black pepper on it after you smooth it out in the bowl. Ha, my mom says I get that from my grandma. I always smooth everything in bowls.

"I may make one tomorrow as today I discovered a jar of treacle in the pantry (molasses to Americans)." - AxellaJ  [sorry, I blew the quote out.]

 

Surely Australians have golden syrup--Tate & Lyles'? That's one of my five food addictions.

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Yes, we have golden syrup here, though I'm not familiar with Tate & Lyles. I've used it to make Golden Syrup dumplings and various other things. Treacle is definitely the thing for Shoo fly pie here, though, and I learnt that the hard way when I used Australian molasses to make gingerbread for my first XMAS in Australia. It came out so bitter, it tasted like poison and left a ghastly taste in my throat that took ages to go away. I think they use the Aussie (pronounced "Ozzie") version of molasses in animal feed.

 

I'm taking a stab in the dark here... Does anyone have a metal bed knitting machine? I'm all at sea with this thing. Our Lions Club has pledged to provide knitted  blankets, made from 10" squares, to a charity, and as it took me a week to make 1 square, I bought this second-hand Singer 324 memomatic (80s vintage, but in great shape) to speed things up. I've managed to get some knitted cloth to come out, but it's not what I was expecting. It's thinner than hand-knitted, and curls up a lot. :-(

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Just a moment out here to recognize the passing of one of the great comic villains of all time:  Billy Clyde Tuggle of All My Children.  Ian gives a tip of the hat to a great, great man.

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He was a terrific actor. I remember seeing him on an episode of "Law and Order", thinking, "that guy looks familiar". I was amazed to see who it was. It was a fantastic performance and as un-BCT as it gets! He had great gifts. I feel for his wife Christine Baranski. :(

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This brought back memories of AMC. I was a random watcher of that show but I remember his character. I have to admit I did not know they were married or maybe I did and it is one of those things I just forgot. But I read an interview where she tells of how they came to be and oohhh, I am still a puddle of goo thinking about it. 

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So I today is the day I got settled in to have a marathon catch up of MDLNY. I had to stop while watching the very first episode because...

Fredrik is showing my future home, a two story, ground floor 4,000 plus sq. ft. home in the Apthorp and he is talking to another broker. Fredrik asks the broker where his buyer is from. Since the guy looks to be Asian, and this show has so many over seas buyers, my stereotyped self in my mind went Japan. I use captions so I was hearing it (barely) and reading the captions. The captions read, He's from Toronto, Canada. Well. Imagine my delight when I got close to the tv and listened again and he said...

 

He's from Taranna, Canda.

Edited by stewedsquash.
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Since the guy looks to be Asian, and this show has so many over seas buyers, my stereotyped self in my mind went Japan. I use captions so I was hearing it (barely) and reading the captions. The captions read, He's from Toronto, Canada. Well. Imagine my delight when I got close to the tv and listened again and he said...

 

He's from Taranna, Canda.

 

That'd be Taranna, Ontario, Canda.

 

Foreign ownership/investment buying are facts of real estate life in this city. Plus, we are multiculty as hell here.

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Multiculty :D

My husband's parents live in small-town Eastern Ontario. When we visit them, we often remark at how odd it seems when everyone at Canadian Tire or the grocery store is Caucasian!

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