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All Episodes Talk: We Have Ribleges!

Since we are unsure if the show will last past the first season and because two episodes are airing back to back, this will be the discussion place for all episodes!

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A place to discuss particular episodes, arcs and moments from the show's run. Please remember this isn't a complete catch-all topic -- check out the forum for character topics and other places for show-related talk.

Edited by SilverStormm. Reason: Official AET text added.
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Some reviews are comparing it to a Norman Lear show (family sits around and talks about issues of the day, in a non PC way), and while it has not gotten to those heights yet, I can see the comparison. I`m really curious to see where this show goes, and how far it can go. 

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Pros: Loretta Devine and Tiffany Haddish. I can take or leave David Alan Grier. Great production values in the sets.

 

Cons:

  • Too preachy, too political, and too heavy-handed. To me it was almost exhausting to watch this show try to hit so many topical issues in 22 minutes.
  • IMO the show's namesake star is a self-consciously bad actor. Not every stand-up comedian with limited acting experience can carry a TV show, even with veterans like Devine and Grier in the supporting cast.
  • I think all the characters' personalities could stand to be dialed back several notches. Some of the actors came across like they were performing on a theater stage and were trying to project to the cheap seats.

 

This show no Black-ish but perhaps that's an unfair comparison since it's probably only intended to be a limited-run summer filler. I probably won't be watching it again.

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I think all the characters' personalities could stand to be dialed back several notches. Some of the actors came across like they were performing on a theater stage and were trying to project to the cheap seats.

The performances along with the set made me feel like I was watching a play. 

I also found it weird that there wasn't another human being other than the 5 main actors in either episode. It gave the show a very claustrophobic/cheap feeling. 

Possibly one of the worst opening themes ever. 

 

When I read the description for the second episode I figured it would draw more humor from how the protests ruined his birthday. This is where a few extra actors filling out the birthday "party" would have come in handy. I wish they could have blurred the lines more about whether Jerrod really thought protesting was useless or if he was just being selfish about his birthday. Anyways, I laughed a few times, so I'll stick it out for the remaining 4 episodes. 

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The commercials made me think I'd hate this, but I gave it a chance because some of my favorite shows had crappy commercials.

 

I thought the first episode hit all the wrong notes possible, with the tension over whether to tell the parents about living together, because I really hate shows based on a couple that fights, especially when it's implied that one of them is the "more mature" and the other is "a juvenile she puts up with for no discernible reason." However, I kind of liked that once the secret was out, the dialogue was little more unpredictable for me. The parents giving advice and pressure and excitement all at once to me was kind of fun-- they aren't just one dimensional stereotypes, they are actually kind of funny. Also, the reasoned way the main couple talked once they stopped competing and actually got serious, I could respect. So, I gave this one a C, instead of a D.

 

The second one I actually liked! I thought they did a good job of representing the kind of mixed feelings and arguments people have about things like protesting and social change. Everything from: I just wanna celebrate my birthday, to I don't want you to get shot, to the thrill of being part of a movement, to the fear that it will get out of hand.... I would much rather see this than one more love triangle among 20-somethings, or the woes of people who've gotten bored with their sorry lives and can't think of anything to do other than bicker.

 

"You don't wear wedges to a protest" was great.

 

I also love that there was some acknowledgment that "the older generation" so often looked at as stuffy and backward by the current crop of youngsters, is actually the group of people who grew up in the 1960s, and have the most legitimate claim to radicalism of any generation currently alive. We are in the era where granny may legitimately be more seasoned than a college kid when it comes to street action.

 

I like the comparison to a Normal Lear production. I think there's something to that. Both in style and substance, with the loud audience laughter, the small cast, the limited sets, the acting style, and the topical humor tackling serious subjects in a nuanced and multifaceted way-- interesting to see if today's audience will take to it the way Lear's did back in the day.

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The first episode was fine as a set up and the scenes with the entire family were fantastic, but the second episode was much much better and hit on heavier topics.

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The commercials made me think I'd hate this, but I gave it a chance because some of my favorite shows had crappy commercials.

 

I thought the first episode hit all the wrong notes possible, with the tension over whether to tell the parents about living together, because I really hate shows based on a couple that fights, especially when it's implied that one of them is the "more mature" and the other is "a juvenile she puts up with for no discernible reason." However, I kind of liked that once the secret was out, the dialogue was little more unpredictable for me. The parents giving advice and pressure and excitement all at once to me was kind of fun-- they aren't just one dimensional stereotypes, they are actually kind of funny. Also, the reasoned way the main couple talked once they stopped competing and actually got serious, I could respect. So, I gave this one a C, instead of a D.

 

The second one I actually liked! I thought they did a good job of representing the kind of mixed feelings and arguments people have about things like protesting and social change. Everything from: I just wanna celebrate my birthday, to I don't want you to get shot, to the thrill of being part of a movement, to the fear that it will get out of hand.... I would much rather see this than one more love triangle among 20-somethings, or the woes of people who've gotten bored with their sorry lives and can't think of anything to do other than bicker.

 

"You don't wear wedges to a protest" was great.

 

I also love that there was some acknowledgment that "the older generation" so often looked at as stuffy and backward by the current crop of youngsters, is actually the group of people who grew up in the 1960s, and have the most legitimate claim to radicalism of any generation currently alive. We are in the era where granny may legitimately be more seasoned than a college kid when it comes to street action.

 

I like the comparison to a Normal Lear production. I think there's something to that. Both in style and substance, with the loud audience laughter, the small cast, the limited sets, the acting style, and the topical humor tackling serious subjects in a nuanced and multifaceted way-- interesting to see if today's audience will take to it the way Lear's did back in the day.

The Wedges line was great! And Carmichael has cited Lear as an influence for the show!

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I liked it.  I'm a bit of a TV show snob anomaly in that as much as I love single cam sitcoms, I also miss well done multi cams which seem to have gone out of style.  I don't know if The Carmichael Show will be an extremely well done multi cam from days gone by but I think it has a lot of potential. 

 

I didn't find the second episode preachy.  It could have been but I think the show did a pretty good job of keeping things light with the backdrop of chaos.  There were swipes at everyone with protestors and looters actually getting mocked the most.  What I really liked about it was how each character had a different reaction to it that helped define who they were. Cynthia, Nekeisha and Maxine were all drawn to it for different reasons just as Jarrod, Bobby and Joe all wanted to avoid it for their different reasons. 

 

And that's why I think it has potential.  Not only does the show have a POV of what it wants to be but there's the sense that it knows who its characters are as well.  Plus, there are funny people on it who made me laugh a few times.

 

I don't know if the show's ratings will justify a surprise renewal as they're talking for Mr. Robinson but I would really like to see NBC give it a chance.  So many sitcoms figure themselves out in their second seasons.

 

I think the most unfortunate thing is that there are only six episodes this season.  I suspect Jerrod wants to make a sitcom about heavier topics (go read the plot descriptions for the next episodes on IMDb) and has packed them into his six eps in case they're all he gets.  I suspect it would work better if we had some more time to get to know these characters is more relaxed situations before we experienced them in more difficult times. 

Edited by Irlandesa.
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I adore Loretta Devine but...no.  Not this one.  I hope to see her in something else someday.

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I actually quite liked the 2nd half hour.  I don't know that I found it particularly preachy since they all had different views on the protests and were coming at it from different sides.  I'm not sure we were even meant to think that anyone was particularly right or wrong.  I admit though I've had a soft spot for Amber Stevens since Greek so I like seeing her on my television.  

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I caught the Sunday encore presentation of this show and had no thoughts going in.  I knew David Allen Grier was on here but didn't realize Lorretta Devine was there until I heard her voice (reminding me of her time on A Different World).  As I was watching from a distance, I didn't recognize Tiffany Haddish.  Also, I never heard of Jerrod Carmichael and spent some time wondering how he came to get his own show.

 

As for the actual show, I enjoyed it.  Actually, my whole family enjoyed it.  I definitely understand the comparisons to a Norman Lear production and since I liked those shows, I hope this one is able to find its footing and last.  The second episode was really good, though I missed some of the middle.  The first episode was good for the humor.  I can't say that I laugh out loud often so this show got my attention that way.  I look forward to watching the remaining episodes.

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I liked this show but the family is really loud as if they are acting in a play and they are trying to project to the cheap seats.  

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Yes, Jerrod Carmichael isn't good but Ray Romano was awful early in his shows run (and the parents living room looked liked the Barones) so I'm willing to overlook that. The second episode was definitely better than the first. It reminds me a bit of Roc which I loved back in the day.

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Yes, Jerrod Carmichael isn't good but Ray Romano was awful early in his shows run (and the parents living room looked liked the Barones) so I'm willing to overlook that.

I agree.  Jerry Seinfeld was never a super terrific actor.  He was just funny and surrounded himself with terrific actors who could also be funny.  Will Smith was so green early on in Fresh Prince that used to unconsciously mouth the lines of the other actors.  I think he'll get better. 

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I loved the "Big Brother" (transgender kid) episode. I put it close to the "Black Lives Matter" episode. I'm amazed by how they are diving in and not wasting any time about tackling issues. And I love that I honestly don't know how any particular character will react to anything. And they usually exceed my expectations either in terms of humor or openness. I hope the kid will be an on-going part of the show and not a one-off character, but I have the sense that this show really is not going to expand the cast beyond the few family members.

 

The "take care of yourself and don't die" episode was decent, also. I like that they are wading into every possible issue and not shying away.

 

The "reverse alimony" reveal also made me smile. I didn't see it coming and I liked how they all took it in stride, rather than getting into a whole "what does this mean about my masculinity" panic.

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I watched "Gender" and it was outright fantastic IMO. This could be a great show. Jerod Carmaichael doesn't need to be peak Robert DeNiro, but I need him to get to Jerry Seinfeld level of acting ability.

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I am enjoying this show as well.  I am really surprised that I like it as much because I knew nothing about the show when I first watched.  Both recent episodes were great to me.  Maybe the discussions are just hitting really close to home but I can relate to some of the familial dynamics in the show.  "Gender" literally had lines that seemed like something I heard/said before.  And the Health episode reminded me of how I view my relationship with my parents as they get older.

 

This show also has some funny lines that are usually said by Loretta Devine or David Alan Grier.  I hope the show does well enough to get another season.  I also hope they'll be able to have more people coming in and out of the mix. 

Sidenote: I heard the show advertised on the Tom Joyner Morning Show yesterday as "something to watch on TV".  Maybe some extra people tuned in out of curiousity. 

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Both episodes were thoughtful but the first one made me laugh the most.  I think it's because I hate kale so the whole "it tastes like Christmas tree in my mouth" and "my body is rejecting the kale" really spoke to me.

 

In encouraging news for those of us who like the show, the ratings went up for the show. It was up 20% from last week.

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Both episodes were thoughtful but the first one made me laugh the most.  I think it's because I hate kale so the whole "it tastes like Christmas tree in my mouth" and "my body is rejecting the kale" really spoke to me.

 

In encouraging news for those of us who like the show, the ratings went up for the show. It was up 20% from last week.

I just made a scheduling and ratings thread for that second part :)

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I really am enjoying this, surprisingly, so I'm thrilled to see the ratings actually went up for week 2.  I think if this can hold steady in week 3 it will likely get a pick-up for future episodes.  I also think Jerrod Carmichael will improve if given time.

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I think Jerrod is already improving. He seemed much more loose and in the flow in "Gender" and less like he was stiffly reading cue cards.

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I loved the Guns and Religion episodes. I am really amazed this is on NBC, or anywhere on TV, right now. And that the ratings are apparently decent.

 

I am wondering about the choice to make Maxine "half-Jewish" and not Muslim or some other religion. It's not like this show to pull punches, but I did have to wonder if it was because being Jewish on TV is less controversial than being Muslim, and the show didn't want to take on the anti-Muslim prejudice. I'm Jewish myself, so I don't mind seeing us represented, but I was still disappointed, because I think the anti-Muslim sentiment floating around this country is in great need of some counterweight, and that this show could have done a great job of that.

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I loved the Guns and Religion episodes. I am really amazed this is on NBC, or anywhere on TV, right now. And that the ratings are apparently decent.

 

I am wondering about the choice to make Maxine "half-Jewish" and not Muslim or some other religion. It's not like this show to pull punches, but I did have to wonder if it was because being Jewish on TV is less controversial than being Muslim, and the show didn't want to take on the anti-Muslim prejudice. I'm Jewish myself, so I don't mind seeing us represented, but I was still disappointed, because I think the anti-Muslim sentiment floating around this country is in great need of some counterweight, and that this show could have done a great job of that.

 

As for Maxine being "half-Jewish" versus Muslim, I figured it was more about her being biracial than professing any religious belief.  Not sure we have been told the ethnic make-up of her parents but I guess one of her parents is ethnically Jewish.

 

I enjoyed both episodes as well.  As a religious person, I have known couples of different religious/spiritual beliefs and it is something that I always ponder if I could do.  With the Guns episode, I was on the "edge" all episode because I kept waiting for the gun to go off (or at least thinking about how it could go off).  I thought it was interesting how Jerrod got rid of his gun where his mother wanted more of them.  And the closeness the father (for some reason, I am blanking on the parents' names) came to shooting Nakeisha kind of dampered some of the jokes about owning at gun.

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I can definitely see the Good Times/All in the Family comparisons. Sure it's not near reaching that level, but it's admirable that it's at least TRYING. I mean nobody tries to make that kind of show today. Even a half-successful version is a better result than it not existing at all.

 

The worst thing is the 2-eps per thing. That's inherently a sign of a network having a show on a short chain.

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I loved the Guns and Religion episodes. I am really amazed this is on NBC, or anywhere on TV, right now. And that the ratings are apparently decent.

 

I am wondering about the choice to make Maxine "half-Jewish" and not Muslim or some other religion. It's not like this show to pull punches, but I did have to wonder if it was because being Jewish on TV is less controversial than being Muslim, and the show didn't want to take on the anti-Muslim prejudice. I'm Jewish myself, so I don't mind seeing us represented, but I was still disappointed, because I think the anti-Muslim sentiment floating around this country is in great need of some counterweight, and that this show could have done a great job of that.

I suppose perhaps they didn't want to invite confusion with the Black Muslims.  Which would be inevitable, and doesn't require mixed-race in the least.  But also, if we're being honest, if you're really talking about her being half Arab (not just Muslim) that's a pretty uncommon mix in this country (not so uncommon in Africa and Europe though). 

 

The actress, Amber Stevens West's own white background is kind of Germanic or Nordic-ish (I dunno exactly what her Daddy, Shadoe Stevens is, but he always seemed to be one of those to me). At the very least that probably meant they couldn't go for half-Asian or half-Latino, because she doesn't look it.

Edited by Kromm.
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Not sure where to post about the 2nd season, so here will have to do. This show is deservedly getting some traction in the manistream media, so I'm a little concerned that thie board is silent. I, for one, am loving that the writers never sacrifice complexity for humor. Any other thoughts?

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I thought it was a well done, well balanced show about Cosby.  I just love DAG and especially as the no-nonsense dad.  The best part was Maxine handing over her phone and the Wikipedia page.

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Not sure where to post about the 2nd season, so here will have to do. 

I believe that you're allowed to make new topics for any episode.

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Season 2 seems to have lost the spark somehow. I was looking forward to the Cosby episode but was disappointed. Although the cast discussed all sides of the issue, it didn't feel sincere or earned to me. Jerrod continues to throw off the acting, I think. Even Loretta is becoming a little one-note shrieky.

Edited by lordonia.
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I was disappointed. In both episodes. I just thought the one about Cosby would have been sharper; funnier.  And the one about funerals just couldn't keep my attention. Until Florence! Marla Gibbs showed up! I did laugh at how she was messing with Joe, blaming him for not helping her out when he was a child. I didn't think she was being serious, but the look on Grier's face was priceless.

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Seems they are trying a bit too hard this season but still funny and still getting renewable ratings.

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Not sure where to post about the 2nd season, so here will have to do.

 I believe that you're allowed to make new topics for any episode.

 

You are definitely allowed to start topics, but for many shows, especially sitcoms, we do tend to have All Episode topics or All Season Episode topics; if there are individual episode topics, and posting is low, the moderators may roll them into an All Episodes topic.

 

Since the editorial side did an article on the first episode of this season, there IS a separate topic for it. And if posting gets crazy-mad, we can do separate season topics or even stand-alone episode topics, but at this point, this is what works for this show.

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I thought the second episode of this season was better than the first, but the show isn't at the level it was during season 1. I'm not sure why that is, but I still enjoy it enough to continue watching.

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I was underwhelmed by both of the last two episodes as well.  The one about Cosby seemed odd. It felt a bit vague and a bit safe.  Though maybe not a surprised as the show is on NBC.  And I could well be wrong, but to me it felt written as a "we love you NBC!" homage to The Cosby Show that almost seemed determined to not separate the man from the performer instead of the reverse.  It was almost like NBC was using the writing here to convince us to write to Nick at Night and ask them to return to airing the show.  Because of the whole talent versus crime thing.  Which I felt was cheap.  Give what the show did for many people of all stripes and shades -- wasn't there an essay in the Washington Post back in the show's heyday about Whites loved The Jeffersons but wanted to be The Cosbys.  Which was a milestone.  And no one should be ashamed because back during the show's prime most people had no idea of what Cosby had done and was doing.  It just felt odd and tepid in terms of addressing the actual matter.

 

The funeral one was also a bit too weak.  I am irreverent as all get out.  So I am on board with Jerrod's disbelief and anger.  But it never really carried through because a lot of the emotional punch just was not there because the grandfather was such an unknown.  I was reminded of the Roseanne episode where her father dies and the way they handled the dysfunction was much sharper.  In main because the history of the man had been well established.  But it also did the dark humor that can arise in funerals and just how silly we can let ourselves be when it comes to the rituals of grief.  I did like seeing Marla Gibbs.  Though it took me second to recognize her.  I hope she comes back because I will be interested to see how her character interacts with Loretta's.  That could be really good if written right.

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I watched his talent vs morals standup before and I didn't like it then either so I didn't like that episode.

 

The funeral episode was much better and actually funny. 

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I guess I missed the part where I was told that this show was filmed before a live audience.  If so, then why didn't anyone cheer when Florence showed up? Also known as Marla Gibbs, whose character on The Jeffersons was a great character. With wit, bite, and funny!  I remember the one episode where she put on a kerchief and called George "Massa."  It was to teach him a lesson.

 

As for the show itself, I don't know if it's Jerrod himself, but there's no...affect? when he's talking. I feel like he's "telling" me about why I should not boycott Cosby.  Like I said, it's like he's doing stand up, and not playing the fictitious character, Jerrod. Does that make sense? He speaks in that flat, monotone way, most times.

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Sometimes talented people just can't be talented at other, similar things, and also can't be talked out of continuing to do the other, similar things.  Carrie Underwood in The Sound of Music Live sang beautifully.  But every spoken word of dialogue was flat, monotone, and tripped you up from enjoying the show.

 

Jerrod Carmichael playing "Jerrod Carmichael" makes Carrie's performance look sparkling, vibrant, and Emmy-worthy in contrast.

 

The story lines aren't bad, there are some interesting contrasts in point-of-view, the other actors go from ok (Maxine) to great (Loretta Devine & David Alan Griers (and I truly hope I spelled these right, but I can't be bothered to double-check ( 8-D ))), but Carmichael's completely flat, one-dimensional line readings smother all of the rest of it.  

 

I think the JerrodC acting failure is why they burned off six episodes in three weeks last summer.  The buzz the show got in spite of that got the second season 13-episode order, and I would bet real money (if I ever bet real money) that everyone, including JerrodC himself, thought that intense acting lessons would do the trick.  I assume that there must have been some kind of coaching, because shows are expensive and NBC isn't quite that desperate.  But if there were lessons or coaching or on-set tutoring, it ain't working.  At All.

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I will watch David Alan Grier in anything! He is so funny and ridiculously talented. The Cosby episode was shocking and pretty funny, too, but in an uncomfortable, edgy way.

Jerrod Carmichael is the weak link in the cast. I hope this leads to DAG's own show - he deserves it. Loretta Divne is pretty great, too. Heck - build a show around *them*!

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So, did anyone watch on Sunday? I'm not sure how I feel about it. Again, Jerrod is the weak link. Some of it came off preachy, though I did appreciate what Cynthia said to Maxine about women in her (Cynthia's) family marrying and taking their husband's name. Just the way the line was delivered. My thinking is that I can accept women who don't want to take their husband's name, but at the same time, those that do, shouldn't be looked down upon.

I did laugh at Joe asking if marriage is so archaic, then why are there so many LGBT who are fighting for it. Basically, I think what he was saying was, if you (Maxine) doesn't want to get married, that's fine, but don't judge those that do want to. Or did I totally misread that and am I overthinking it all?

I don't know how much longer I can watch. It's just not making me laugh. I find myself...bored.

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Can't remember the line verbatim, I loved it when the brother was handing the canned goods to Maxine, who said she was glad that Paula Deen was back, and something about how her family would have starved -- that's the part I can't recall:) -- but it was funny on a number of levels.

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I'm also not enjoying the show as much as last season. I'm also getting really uncomfortable with how much personal information Jerrod/Maxine keep sharing with his family. I get it that to make the show work, we need for them to be thrown together each week. I just find it...unsettling. 

Jerrod is absolutely the weakest of weak links. Maxine (don't know the name of the actress) is ok. Jerrod's family is what holds it together. DAG and LD are hilarious, even though I wanted to knock her out this week! At least she rehearsed and delivered her apology well!

I don't know how much longer I'll in watching either. It's like it's overly preachy and also not handling the messages well at the same time, it's just weird. It needs to get really funny and soon. 

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I'm also not enjoying the show as much as last season. I'm also getting really uncomfortable with how much personal information Jerrod/Maxine keep sharing with his family. I get it that to make the show work, we need for them to be thrown together each week. I just find it...unsettling.

 

The oversharing is out of control! I get that it's pretty much the premise of the show, but ugh.

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I will watch David Alan Grier in anything! He is so funny and ridiculously talented. The Cosby episode was shocking and pretty funny, too, but in an uncomfortable, edgy way.

Jerrod Carmichael is the weak link in the cast. I hope this leads to DAG's own show - he deserves it. Loretta Divne is pretty great, too. Heck - build a show around *them*!

 

 

ICAM.  Every time I watch the show it occurs to me that the show would be soooo much better if was about DAG and LD's characters.

For all I care, they can replace the rest of the cast (because they're totally uninteresting), and Carmichael can just be an occasional guest star (because he's just that terrible).

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"something about how her family would have starved -- that's the part I can't recall:) -- but it was funny on a number of levels."

I finally remembered the gist of the line: Maxine said something about how if she hadn't been allowed to cook when she used the "n" word her family would have starved.

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Can't remember the line verbatim, I loved it when the brother was handing the canned goods to Maxine, who said she was glad that Paula Deen was back, and something about how her family would have starved -- that's the part I can't recall:) -- but it was funny on a number of levels.

 

 

"something about how her family would have starved -- that's the part I can't recall:) -- but it was funny on a number of levels."

I finally remembered the gist of the line: Maxine said something about how if she hadn't been allowed to cook when she used the "n" word her family would have starved.

I am not that great on names but I believe Maxine is the girlfriend and the mother's name is Cynthia.

 

As for this season, I am still enjoying the show though I may not be laughing as much as I did last season.  I do agree that Loretta and David are the absolute best part of the show but then I realize how much longer they have been doing this than the rest of the cast.

 

One thing I hope they do is have more guest stars or just random interactions outside of the C6.  Since it is an updated version of a Norman Lear show, I would like to see them around other people a little more often.

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If so, then why didn't anyone cheer when Florence showed up?

I noticed that too. It seemed like there was a pause for people to do it, but maybe they weren't 100% sure it was her and by the time they did, the scene had moved on. I did like the funeral episode, especially the scene between Jarrod and his dad. I do like that this show can switch to serious. It can be a little jarring but it was still effective. And the scene with Maxine and her mistaking the cousin for Jarrod made me laugh a lot for some reason.

 

I like this show. It isn't perfect, but it's refreshing to me. And I agree that Jarrod is a weak link with his acting, he has improved to me. I think the worst is the brother. He is terrible to me. His delivery is awful and his range is so one-note. I don't mind the sister-in-law, but I would be fine if they would have the two of them reunite and run away and introduce a long-lost cousin or something to replace him.

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Didn't finish watching the gentrification episode. Done.

 

Bobby and Nekeisha are sitcom cartoons, Maxine and Jerrod have zero chemistry and I have no idea why they're even a couple. DAG isn't reason enough to watch.

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Do the writers think the viewers are stupid? Or that they don't know what gentrification means?  When Jerrod pontificated and explained to his mother what it was, and then Maxine said what it was, I felt like I was getting a lecture/lesson on what the meaning of gentrification is. Instead of just talking about it without having to 'explaaaain' it.

 

Another dud for me. Well, except for when Bobby walked out. I wish they hadn't gone for the laughs the second time--and just had him continue to walk out the front door of his parents' house. But no, he had to come back in because bees? And left through the back door.

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I thought the gentrification episode was one of the most offensive, insulting bits of bullshit I have ever seen on television. The idea that poor people are just not tough enough and working hard enough at their goals is such a load. Most people who are being gentrified out of their homes are WORKING. I doubt a guy as smug and soft as Jerrod would cope for five minutes with the kind of grinding hardship most people in poverty deal with all the time. Also, as has been said upthread, stop making the parents seem like dummies. They were sharp and not even slightly out-matched by Jerrod or Maxine before, so turning them into clueless buffoons now is a huge insult to everyone involved. Maybe Carmichael's success has gone to his head and turning him into an arrogant schmuck. He's working with people who can give him greatness, don't dumb down their characters to make his own acting deficiencies seem less glaring. It's inexcusable and it's not working!

 

Season 2 has been less funny and less insightful and less interesting than Season 1, and I don't know if it's coming from Carmichael himself (his behavior on The Late Show makes me think that's possible) or if it's coming from the network dictating a change in tone, but either way, it's a real disappointment.

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