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What's For Dinner?

I'm on the east coast of Canada.  I think it's more of a rural vs. urban thing. 

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1 hour ago, Spunkygal said:

Our neighborhood had one of those online calendars where you could sign up to take a meal to some neighbors whose son was undergoing chemo. I signed up to take a pot roast for dinner and about 1 pm the dad called me to ask if they had misunderstood that I was bringing dinner, i.e., "where are you?" but not in those words. I said no misunderstanding, I am bringing dinner. Well, they call their noon meal dinner. So they got pot roast for supper!

BTW, son is in remission and doing great!

YAY!!! GOOD NEWS!!!

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2 hours ago, Spunkygal said:

 

BTW, son is in remission and doing great!

Good news.  Wishing him continued good health.

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I live in the northeast & we're in a heat wave for the next few days.  We drove to a nice lakeside restaurant for some vino & appetizers.  There was a nice breeze & it was very comfortable eating outside.

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We are not having a heatwave, it was a high of 60, so braised short ribs, polenta and broccolini for dinner .

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I'm reading the kidlet these Enid Blyton books and it seems dinner is lunch and supper is dinner. I thought it was a Brit thing!

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1 hour ago, biakbiak said:

We are not having a heatwave, it was a high of 60, so braised short ribs, polenta and broccolini for dinner .

I'm very envious of your dinner & cool temperatures.  Please send both my way.   :) 

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I discovered the word supper, meaning the evening meal I call dinner, as a child, by reading it in a book and asking my parents what the hell these characters were eating.  It turned out my dad had grown up (in '40s-'50s small town Oklahoma) using the words interchangeably, but since by the time I came along he'd been in Los Angeles nearly 10 years and supper was completely gone from his vocabulary, I'd never heard him use it.

I went through a phase when I was around 30 where I packed big meals for lunch and ate light dinners when I got home, but it just didn't work for me.  I'm a night person on every level, including my appetite.

I haven't decided on tonight's dinner yet.  Probably tilapia.

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Dinner tonight was Vinegar soy braised pork ribs, baby spinach and bean thread vermicelli in chicken stock (dish that we eat at chinese restaurants but I copied it), tomato and coriander fried egg omelette, all served with white rice.

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My daughter has softball every single day this week so I grilled up 3 pounds of chicken on Sunday and also made a BBQ meatloaf. Should get me through a couple quick meals between work and softball. 

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My SIL is a vegetarian so my brother normally grills on Sunday and makes extra so there's meat at the ready for him and his son during the week.  My SIL still cooks meat, but this makes the dinner work a little easier for a few nights.  Other than grilling, my brother does not cook.  But my nephew usually makes dinner for everyone at least 2x per week.

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I've always been of the opinion that even bad pizza is pretty swell but the one I made this weekend was the worst.  I'm hoping it miraculously improves as leftovers tonight.

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I'll cross my fingers for you @Qoass, but miracle pizzas are few and far between.  

Speaking of pizza, my daughter will get a slice of leftover pizza for her pre-softball dinner tonight, but that was from one of the better pizza places around here from when the day got away from me on Saturday and I decided to phone it in for dinner. 

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21 hours ago, Spunkygal said:

BTW, son is in remission and doing great!

That's awesome!  :-)

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21 hours ago, Quof said:

I'm on the east coast of Canada.  I think it's more of a rural vs. urban thing. 

It's USUALLY the case, but my in-laws are from Montreal.  Perhaps it's also a Montreal Anglophone thing they held on to when they moved to Ottawa?

Edited by PRgal.
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I was going to make some stir fry with boneless chicken thighs, some type of veggie mixture over brown rice, but after doing errands (drugstore, two grocery stores--to get what I needed, and getting my hair cut) I'm going to save the stir fry for tomorrow and settle for a ham sandwich and some goldfish crackers (and a big glass of ice water). 

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Order in an Indian feast of about 12 dishes for a few friends to watch the Warriors win!

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Crispy Pata for hubby from the local Philippine store. I'll be making the pancit bihon with shrimp, chicken and sausage so I can cook my portion a bit softer.

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Interesting to read about the use of "supper" and "dinner".  I grew up in NYS and we used the words interchangably.  It wasn't until I moved to NC that I learned using either word told folks something about your life (were you from farm people? or from city folks?).  That was quite bewildering to me then and I still am having difficulty deciding which word to use because of that experience in NC.

Supper (heh!) tonight is just for me and was reheated pork fried rice leftover from Chinese delivery (I added some pineapple to make it interesting).  Geez it's hot here.  And this is just the start of summer.  I wanna move to Vermont or NH.  Get me outta here!!!!

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1 hour ago, annzeepark914 said:

Interesting to read about the use of "supper" and "dinner".  I grew up in NYS and we used the words interchangably.

Me, too! Although it was referred to as "dinner" when I went to college, so I tended to use that predominantly for a while. My parents teased me about it (good naturedly). Now, since that is enough in the rear-view mirror (graduated college in '95), I use both terms again.

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Bun Thit Nuong because it's easy since I did chores and made pecan pie today. 

Harvested a few blood oranges so squeezing us fresh blood orange juice to drink with dinner. 

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On 1/27/2017 at 0:07 AM, DeLurker said:

@NutMeg - I think the I Need a Recipe thread is a good start.  And when someone talks about a dish they made that turned out well, they've been very open to sharing when someone else asks.  And I haven't done it here (yet), but I find prefacing a question with EILIF (Explain in like I'm Five) communicates my interest, but I'm a beginner. 

(came here for something else - see below - but apparently this post has been waiting to be posted for a while)

Thank you so much, now up to exploring the threads that don't show on top of the Food section. And will try and remember EILIF too :) but I will probably have forgotten by the time i'm next getting angsty about something I've had in my freezer for too long a while...

What I was coming in for though is the dinner/supper thingy. As I understand it, and that's true for Europe back in 17th to 19th century, so probably exported to America, in high society, a late lunch, called dinner, was the norm, taken in the afternoon, and supper was something you had at the end of the evening (depending of countries and centuries, after theatre or coming back from court or what have you). Whereas people from the countryside, who lacked all these delicate amusements, rose up earlier and went to bed earlier too. Therefore they had their "dinner" when the court was just waking up and their supper when these other fine people were getting ready for a night of fun, angst, intrigue, etc.

And because everyone is keen on looking polished, dinner, as used at the European courts, meaning NOT an evening meal, prevailed. With a few exceptions. Dinner and supper were used at the time where French was the main language in diplomacy and widely used at various courts, but people who migrated during that time to America (including Canada) took these uses of the words with them, and as they generally came from the countryside their meaning prevailed. So I suspect poor Irish, English and French immigrants, for instance, came from rural areas. It often amuses me how some French Canadian idioms an pronunciations are so close to old French and very specific French regional rural pronunciation that you only hear nowadays from the oldest people in the more remote areas (if you still do). Note that outside from cities, I've also heard old people in Belgium using dinner/supper (well, dîner, souper in French).    

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In my head, supper was the evening meal in the kitchen whereas dinner was when we had company and had to sit at the bigger table in the dining room whatever the time of day.

On a side note, I've always found the word "dine" to be hideously affected. I don't dine; I eat.

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On 6/12/2017 at 6:44 AM, Qoass said:

I've always been of the opinion that even bad pizza is pretty swell but the one I made this weekend was the worst.  I'm hoping it miraculously improves as leftovers tonight.

It would be better to eat it cold for breakfast on an early bleary-eyed morning.

Hungover or exhausted helps.

1 hour ago, Qoass said:

In my head, supper was the evening meal in the kitchen whereas dinner was when we had company and had to sit at the bigger table in the dining room whatever the time of day.

On a side note, I've always found the word "dine" to be hideously affected. I don't dine; I eat.

I feed.

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I think growing up, the only time I heard "dinner" used exclusively was for "Sunday Dinner" and for holiday meals (I.e. Thanksgiving Dinner or Christmas dinner ) which were served in the early afternoon.  Otherwise "supper" and "dinner" were used interchangeably to mean the evening meal.

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Smothered pork chops in a scratch mushroom cream sauce. Basmati rice or linguini (haven't decided) and sauted spinach. Marinated tomatoes for salad.

Dessert vanilla ice cream with fresh strawberries.

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21 hours ago, annzeepark914 said:

Interesting to read about the use of "supper" and "dinner".

"Beef. It's what's for dinner." Loved those ads. You can get the recipes, too, they have a website.

So, tea. In our Canadian family, tea was mid-morning and mid-afternoon, a hot beverage with biscuits. However, on an old episode of Doctor Who, a character was having pork chops for tea. In the UK, is afternoon tea more like dinner? 

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Dinner vs Supper.  I think growing up we used both terms.  I do know that Hyacinth Bucket (Keeping Up Appearances) has candlelight suppers that no one wants to go to.

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41 minutes ago, ennui said:

"Beef. It's what's for dinner." Loved those ads. You can get the recipes, too, they have a website.

So, tea. In our Canadian family, tea was mid-morning and mid-afternoon, a hot beverage with biscuits. However, on an old episode of Doctor Who, a character was having pork chops for tea. In the UK, is afternoon tea more like dinner? 

What I was once told is that "tea" for working classes was more of a meal and "tea" for upper classes was a light snack to hold you till dinner. It could also be a social event.

Somebody probably has a better answer or knows first hand.

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Tonight we had chicken burgers, macaroni salad, and asparagus with homemade "Russian Dressing" and chopped eggs on top.  Mr. P914 said it was the best meal of his vacation trip (he just got back at noon) to the Black Hills in SD that he took with our daughter and her family (me? I preferred to stay home in the AC and read book club selections!).

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Whatever's easy.  1/2 the day at the dealer getting my car serviced followed by a couple hours washing & drying my big dopey dog ( who practices passive resistance )which requires full shower for me.

I've had Asian cole slaw and a nectarine so far.  

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Jap Chae tonight!!!! With bulgogi chicken!!!! Going to eat my weight in carbs!!!!!!

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4 hours ago, ennui said:

So, tea. In our Canadian family, tea was mid-morning and mid-afternoon, a hot beverage with biscuits. However, on an old episode of Doctor Who, a character was having pork chops for tea. In the UK, is afternoon tea more like dinner? 

 

3 hours ago, Giselle said:

What I was once told is that "tea" for working classes was more of a meal and "tea" for upper classes was a light snack to hold you till dinner. It could also be a social event.

Somebody probably has a better answer or knows first hand.

I was always told that "high tea" was more of a meal and "afternoon tea" was scones and crustless cucumber sandwiches.  Not that you can't fill up on scones and tiny sandwiches, but that's allegedly more refined.   When I was in London lo these many years ago, it was billed as "afternoon tea."  

There's a place in Baltimore, Bertha's (home of the bumper sticker "Eat Bertha's Mussels"), that serves "high tea".  It really is a meal.

On topic, dinner tonight was lemon yogurt and chips.  And wine, of course.

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I made Ina Garten's Crusty Baked Shells & Cauliflower from her latest show and a big salad.

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3 hours ago, Mellowyellow said:

Jap Chae tonight!!!! With bulgogi chicken!!!! Going to eat my weight in carbs!!!!!!

Please can I come over???!!!????

 

I loooove Japchae.

You can send leftovers to 1313 Mockingbird Lane Hollywood, CA 90000  

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1 hour ago, Giselle said:

Please can I come over???!!!????

 

I loooove Japchae.

You can send leftovers to 1313 Mockingbird Lane Hollywood, CA 90000  

haha of course you can!

I love the noodles so I often make extra noodles and carb out!

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Mellowyellow, I have no idea what half the stuff you post is, but I suspect it's as delicious as all get out!

Of course, I have leftovers on tap for tonight.  Again.

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1 hour ago, Qoass said:

Mellowyellow, I have no idea what half the stuff you post is, but I suspect it's as delicious as all get out!

Of course, I have leftovers on tap for tonight.  Again.

Ha! I was thinking the same thing. And eating the same thing. In the 8 minutes I had to eat between coming home and carting the girl off to softball yesterday I chopped up a chicken breast (previously mentioned above) and put it on a whole wheat wrap with some hot peppers. Then I wolfed down some leftover broccoli and a slice of watermelon. Grabbed a bottle of water and jumped in the car.  Got one more night of this crap tonight and then I get to cook again tomorrow. 

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My husband and I attended a museum's annual dinner for donors/members last night.  The food was great (buffet with lots of options (we're talking the whole shebang - beef, chicken, fish AND a vegetarian option.  I tried all four)), but by the time we reached the dessert table, all was left were cookies (and one bite-sized mocha cake, which I took))!!!!! 

Tonight?  Steamed stuffed peppers (with ground turkey), asparagus and portobello.  Haven't decided whether I'm going to make quinoa or freekeh.

Edited by PRgal.
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2 hours ago, PRgal said:

My husband and I attended a museum's annual dinner for donors/members last night.  The food was great (buffet with lots of options (we're talking the whole shebang - beef, chicken, fish AND a vegetarian option.  I tried all four)), but by the time we reached the dessert table, all was left were cookies (and one bite-sized mocha cake, which I took))!!!!! 

Tonight?  Steamed stuffed peppers (with ground turkey), asparagus and portobello.  Haven't decided whether I'm going to make quinoa or freekeh.

We just tried freekeh the other day and didn't care for it. I thought texture was fine but the taste not so much, I cooked it chicken broth and herbs the way I've done other grains. Mr.G didn't care for the texture nor taste. We prefer the quinoa or bulgur. Since he will readily eat those I'm happy.

Hubby is very specific with what he likes. He loves sushi but hates most cooked fish except cod, sword fish, tuna, shark and trout. Loves guacamole but hates avacados. Hates sour cream but loves dip. Hates tomatoes but loves salsa and Pico de gallo.

A Irishman who isn't fond of potatoes unless they are fried.

Edited by Giselle.
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21 hours ago, ennui said:

And then there's The Last Supper.  

Well, that's why it's now called dinner.

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4 hours ago, JTMacc99 said:

and then I get to cook again tomorrow

I'm trying to think, and I don't recall ever being thrilled that I "get to" cook. In my world, it's simply a necessity because I don't care for raw meat and dry pasta.

You may wonder why I read this topic. I ask myself the same thing. And then I see:

17 hours ago, ebk57 said:

dinner tonight was lemon yogurt and chips.  And wine, of course.

and I feel at home. 

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22 hours ago, Giselle said:

What I was once told is that "tea" for working classes was more of a meal and "tea" for upper classes was a light snack to hold you till dinner. It could also be a social event.

Somebody probably has a better answer or knows first hand.

From what *I* understand, "high tea" was what the working classes had as a meal in the late afternoon and "afternoon tea" (the afternoon snack with fancy sandwiches and scones) is what many of us today (especially on this side of the Atlantic) call "high tea."

Edited by PRgal.
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2 hours ago, MargeGunderson said:

Well, that's why it's now called dinner.

Ooooh!!!!!!!

High five!!!

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I have no idea what's for dinner, but for lunch I just had a BLT made with my garden's first tomato of the season.  Bliss.

As for the teas, as I understand it, historically high tea was a full, family meal served when workers got home for the evening, while low tea was the afternoon social gathering for ladies of leisure (the tea and small snacks were also enjoyed by other high society members, too), who ate fashionably late in the evening and thus liked a little something to tide them over.

Edited by Bastet.
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22 hours ago, ebk57 said:

... On topic, dinner tonight was lemon yogurt and chips.  And wine, of course.

What kind of wine pairs well with lemon yogurt?  Depends on what kind of chips, perhaps?

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38 minutes ago, 3pwood said:

What kind of wine pairs well with lemon yogurt?  Depends on what kind of chips, perhaps?

I'm wondering what Mr. ebk had for dinner ... the same thing? 

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