Coffeecup

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  1. At the beginning, she said she was going to sell "luxury for less" products. Didn't she name her company Smarter Luxury? I think she had something like GILI in mind, where she would sell knockoffs of luxury items. But she didn't follow through. Other than a few pieces of expensive jewelry she was selling on commission (?), most of her products are janky junk. Not even good enough to be knockoffs.
  2. Doughnut? I'd call that a bundt cake hairdo.
  3. Tommy (?) and Casey do gemstone shows once in a while in prime time. Sometimes they show a few loose stones while doing a regular jewelry show. I miss Cheryl Ells and her Late Night Rocks loose gemstone shows. She was so much fun! I don't know what she's doing now. After she left JTV for the second time, she was a host on Shop LC in Texas (former Liquidation Channel) for a short time, and then vanished from TV. Her Facebook page says she's self-employed (she has a website and sells jewelry from it), and her LinkedIn page appears to be a brief resume. She must be looking for a job. I have a bunch of loose stones I've bought over the years, but haven't gotten around to having any of them set.
  4. Nah, she just got caught in the rain.
  5. Coming in late to the discussion of changing the font size on your computer screen. Note: these instructions are for a Windows computer. Quick and dirty way to change it: Press Control key (CTRL) and the plus sign key (upper case of key with equal sign) at the same time. Screen goes up one size, by which I mean 10% to 20% bigger. Repeat as needed until font and images are big enough. To make it smaller: Press CTRL and the minus sign (hyphen) at the same time. Lather-rinse-repeat. Sometimes you want your screen pretty small (like 50% or 75%) on a temporary basis because of the way one particular website was designed. For example, you're trying to look through a picture gallery, and every time you click to the next picture, part of it gets cut off at the top or bottom of the screen -- due to the programmer placing it too high or too low on the page. Firefox discussion: I have to use FF for some websites that won't render properly or won't scroll properly in IE. FF used to be great, but for the past few months it has crashed almost every day. Although it has crashed on a variety of sites, it especially hates websites with the Disqus comment system. Very annoying because when FF crashes, it freezes my whole computer. It hangs on the page I was looking at, and there is no response to clicks or cursor movement. Often I have to kill FF through Control Panel/Task Manager (which I affectionately call Search and Destroy), but FF hangs up my computer so badly that even Task Manager takes forever to load. FF seems to hog all the resources whenever it crashes. A few minutes after you extricate your poor computer from the crash, FF has the nerve to put a little box on your screen that says "We're sorry... Mozilla crash report... (etc.)" Stuff your weasel apology, Firefox.
  6. I remember Elizabeth. I always enjoyed watching her too.
  7. Is it just bad lighting in this shot, or did she skip putting self-tanner on her legs? I'm seeing very brown face, arms, hands, and torso, compared to much whiter ankles and feet. Tsk, tsk, this is one time when you need to be matchy-matchy.
  8. Re-posting this on the Small Talk thread per the suggestions of several people who read it in the JTV thread, where I originally posted it. It's so cold here that I was worried about wearing my jewelry outside. I knew that opals shouldn't be worn in extreme cold, and I'd heard anecdotes about pearls exploding when people went from frigid outdoor temperatures into warm buildings. This article has good advice about wearing gemstones in cold weather: http://www.aronstam.com/protecting-your-jewelry-in-cold-weather/ "Protecting your jewelry in cold weather" ... "More often than not, colored gemstones tend to be sensitive to rapid temperature changes, called thermal shock in the industry... Stepping from the warmth of your house to an ambient temperature below freezing causes the rapid contraction of structurally unstable gemstones (like opals and emeralds), which can make the whole gem fracture, or even pop... First, you need to know what gemstones you own are susceptible to thermal shock... At the top of the list are opal, emerald, and tanzanite. Next are moonstone and aquamarine. Then it’s topaz, quartz, all of the garnets, and tourmaline..." [see article for more information] Wow. Sounds like it might be best to wear plain gold or silver jewelry when you're going to be outside for longer than a few minutes in subfreezing temperatures. Diamonds would probably be okay (not mentioned in the article), as well as sapphires and rubies. However, you'd have to be sure the sapphires and rubies weren't the kind with lead glass-filled fissures (like JTV's "Mahaleo" rubies and sapphires -- they do tell you on air about the glass filling, by the way). The article doesn't say anything about the effect of extreme cold on synthetic gemstones like cubic zirconia. JTV sells a lot of tanzanite. Once in a while they do say you should not wear your tanzanite as everyday jewelry, since it's a bit fragile and brittle. But I don't recall ever hearing them give warnings about wearing tanzanite in extreme cold temperatures. 7
  9. Many people get cracked skin on their fingertips during the winter. That can be very uncomfortable. You need heavy duty moisturizer, and a commitment to wearing gloves when outdoors.
  10. Not a good sales pitch. Nobody gathers around a desktop to watch movies (or gathers around any of the smaller devices). People gather around wide screen TV sets to watch anything as a group. (And why the hell would anybody want a touch screen desktop in the first place? You're supposed to keep reaching way across your desk to touch the screen, then try to read text on a dirty screen with fingerprint smudges? This sounds like the Microsoft corporate nerds trying to force the whole Windows world into using touch screens instead of keyboards.) Desktops are what you want if you need a computer to do work, like typing documents, creating spreadsheets, doing graphic design and artwork, doing any kind of engineering work, etc. When they sell desktops, they should make the sales pitch to people who run a small business or work from home.
  11. Wasn't sure where to put this, but I'll try the JTV thread since all they sell is jewelry. It's so cold here that I was worried about wearing my jewelry outside. I knew that opals shouldn't be worn in extreme cold, and I'd heard anecdotes about pearls exploding when people went from frigid outdoor temperatures into warm buildings. This article has good advice about wearing gemstones in cold weather: http://www.aronstam.com/protecting-your-jewelry-in-cold-weather/ "Protecting your jewelry in cold weather" ... "More often than not, colored gemstones tend to be sensitive to rapid temperature changes, called thermal shock in the industry... Stepping from the warmth of your house to an ambient temperature below freezing causes the rapid contraction of structurally unstable gemstones (like opals and emeralds), which can make the whole gem fracture, or even pop... First, you need to know what gemstones you own are susceptible to thermal shock... At the top of the list are opal, emerald, and tanzanite. Next are moonstone and aquamarine. Then it’s topaz, quartz, all of the garnets, and tourmaline..." [see article for more information] Wow. Sounds like it might be best to wear plain gold or silver jewelry when you're going to be outside for longer than a few minutes in subfreezing temperatures. Diamonds would probably be okay (not mentioned in the article), as well as sapphires and rubies. However, you'd have to be sure the sapphires and rubies weren't the kind with lead glass-filled fissures (like JTV's "Mahaleo" rubies and sapphires -- they do tell you on air about the glass filling, by the way). The article doesn't say anything about the effect of extreme cold on synthetic gemstones like cubic zirconia. JTV sells a lot of tanzanite. Once in a while they do say you should not wear your tanzanite as everyday jewelry, since it's a bit fragile and brittle. But I don't recall ever hearing them give warnings about wearing tanzanite in extreme cold temperatures.
  12. I really think they're lying about that being a bra in the Before picture. It looks more like they glued some crumpled paper towels over her bewbs. If it actually is a bra, it's an unlined, unpadded bra with a cup size that's too big, so it got mashed up under the tight shirt. Could also be a bra with heavily textured lace, which always looks awful under a smooth knit shirt. Either way, they cheated in the Before picture.
  13. Dafuq? She doesn't look like the same person in this picture and the IT Cosmetics picture. Neither picture looks like she did when she was a QVC host. What has she done to her face? Despite our snark about about Lisa R and her endless, vain photoshopping -- at least she is still recognizable.
  14. Hard to tell from this picture exactly which shoes she's wearing, but they look like high heel booties. Not the best choice if you need to do a lot of walking! Here are the "twins" in their cold shoulder tops.